Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Chuck Berry vs Keith Richards!


Rabs

Recommended Posts

That was great. Talk about put Richards in his place, I liked that about starting with the bend up and when Keith said that you can't sing and play the fills and Chuck say's 'I always have'. Great.

And how much better does Chuck's Gibson sound compared to the Fender bender ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Richards really seems to be on something in the first part of the interview, but I don't see any problems between Berry and Richards in the rest of the clip. They seem to get-along well. This is Berry's music and he's telling Richards how he wants it to sound. Richards acknowledges it and plays-the-hell out of it. Chuck Berry appears to be very pleased with it. We have two very big egos involved. Both Berry and Richards are reknowned for being rude/abrasive/abrupt at times, but hey, that's how they come across because in their own personal ways they are very demanding of other musicians. I thought it was entertaining, and I'd have been surprised if Chuck Berry wasn't telling exactly how the music should be done. It is his music. Do we think that Richards says nothing when someone else is on-stage with him and is not doing the music to Jumpin/ Jack Flash or Satisfaction in the way Richards/Jagger want to hear it? When I first saw the title of the thread, I was thinking there must have been an argument, etc., or at least a picking showdown. It wasn't either. It was how professional musicians often get things done.

 

Read about Chet Atkins. He was very demanding of his fellow musicians and could be very difficult to work with if you couldn't do the job the way he wanted it. Very few "top shelf" musicians were able to work well with him, because Chet demanded the best.

Read about The Highwaymen. Four gigantic egos. Each expecting "their" music to be played "their" way.

 

And yeah, Berry's Gibson is outstanding in comparison to the Fender. The difference in sound was obvious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Richards really seems to be on something in the first part of the interview, but I don't see any problems between Berry and Richards in the rest of the clip. They seem to get-along well. This is Berry's music and he's telling Richards how he wants it to sound. Richards acknowledges it and plays-the-hell out of it. Chuck Berry appears to be very pleased with it. We have two very big egos involved. Both Berry and Richards are reknowned for being rude/abrasive/abrupt at times, but hey, that's how they come across because in their own personal ways they are very demanding of other musicians. I thought it was entertaining, and I'd have been surprised if Chuck Berry wasn't telling exactly how the music should be done. It is his music. Do we think that Richards says nothing when someone else is on-stage with him and is not doing the music to Jumpin/ Jack Flash or Satisfaction in the way Richards/Jagger want to hear it? When I first saw the title of the thread, I was thinking there must have been an argument, etc., or at least a picking showdown. It wasn't either. It was how professional musicians often get things done.

 

Read about Chet Atkins. He was very demanding of his fellow musicians and could be very difficult to work with if you couldn't do the job the way he wanted it. Very few "top shelf" musicians were able to work well with him, because Chet demanded the best.

Read about The Highwaymen. Four gigantic egos. Each expecting "their" music to be played "their" way.

 

And yeah, Berry's Gibson is outstanding in comparison to the Fender.

The title was more about the bit of not touching Chucks amp and was only tongue in cheek :) ... and of course I dont blame him, I wouldnt want someone touching my settings either (thats why you set them that way ;))...... I just thought it was a fun video when I saw it, so wanted share :)

 

Oh and ive been in bands and been a sound engineer and worked at places like the BBC so I totally understand what these people are like. When it comes to work they are prefectionists and you have to be at that level... its all good :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very true...and also, what often happens, when trying to play "exactly" like the original version, or

at least the original artist's "wants/needs" for his/her version, is...that in the presence of that

"master," it's becomes more difficult, for the other musicians, to replicate it, when they're being

hassled, about it, constantly. They tense up, and make mistakes, they would not, ordinarily, make.

Keef can play that riff, perfectly, and Chuck knows it. But, in the presence of one of his idols,

even Keef "screws up," at first...until they both relax, a bit!

 

I doubt, I could even "play" at all, in front of any of my true "Idols!" LOL At least, for awhile... [biggrin]

 

CB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That whole film (Chuck's 50's birthday concert, or whatever it's called) is a GREAT film...a must for any fan of Chuck or Keef.

 

I loved it because I felt like I gained a lot of insight to both those guy's playing. When I saw it around the time it was made, it had been a long time sinse I had heard Keef do a lead, and seeing him and hearing him do such gave me a lot of insight on his talents, and the sound of the 'early' Stones.

 

Mr. Richerds WAS the man to bring out Mr. Berry at that time, as he truly understands the kiCka$$ nature of Chuck's 'Rock and Roll'.

 

To me, I don't think there is a better example of Chuck Berry music than this film. His records are great and stand the test of time, but it many elements of it can get lost because they are such old recordings. Putting yourself in the context of the times when they were made as you listen sometimes requires you forget all the covers and the more 'upfront' guitar sounds Rock and Rollers usually like. The music here is not a dumed-down tamed version of him; it is CHUCK gettin' down.

 

In the performance, some of the leads Keef pulls off are just SPOOKY good. I didn't know at the time he had it in him, but apparrently, he does.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the movie is 'Hail Hail Rock 'n' Roll'. Richards wanted to back Chuck and produce a concert using hand-picked, rehearsed musicians (including Steve Jordan on drums), contrary to Chuck's usual unrehearsed pickup band.

The whole thing about the amp settings is that Keith felt Chuck might not get the right tone for the filmed recording of the concert, so they had to craftily take a line out to a couple of amps hidden elsewhere. KR told it in a 'Guitar Player' interview.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...