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tommyb

Mic for recording acoustic guitar...

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The Sure SM-58 is a fine mic especially for voice from what I hear. But when I record acoustic guitar the bass and lower mid-range seems to over-power everything else and usually I have to do some equalization after the fact to get it right. Even backing down the bass and midrange on the "amp" doesn't seem to help much.

 

Any ideas? Oh, my budget is shall we say limited and of course I'm doing all this for fun so a pricey pro model would be inappropriate but I'd like something decent. Any ideas?

 

Thanks!

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The Sure SM-58 is a fine mic especially for voice from what I hear. But when I record acoustic guitar the bass and lower mid-range seems to over-power everything else and usually I have to do some equalization after the fact to get it right. Even backing down the bass and midrange on the "amp" doesn't seem to help much.

 

Any ideas? Oh, my budget is shall we say limited and of course I'm doing all this for fun so a pricey pro model would be inappropriate but I'd like something decent. Any ideas?

 

Thanks!

 

Your using an Amplifier? That may be where your going wrong, find a room/hallway in your house with a high ceiling and wood floor and make some test recording's with just you, your guitar and the 58.

 

This recording was made with a SM58 propped up in front of me on a tripod in a bedroom as I played (2011 Epiphone Texan FT-79) and sang. I do have a good interface (MOTU 24i) with sweet converter's so maybe that's holding you back too.

 

http://d3ew4rh7xxgmkq.cloudfront.net/performer/69390/audio/69390_StarryNight%28DonMcLeancover%29.mp3

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Sorry...I should have been clearer. My "amp" is virtual. I use POD FARM 2 software for my amps and tones and monitor through headphones during recording with final mixing done through speakers. I interface with a Line 6 UX-1 into a laptop and use Audacity as my DAW.

 

Your recording sounds terrific by the way! I wish I had your vocal quality.

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The SM58 is a great mic which I think is better suited to vocals but you can get good results with acoustics. You may have tried this but, if you haven't, it's worth experimenting with the mic position. I have a six string Yamaha and a twelve string Freshman. The Yamaha records best with the mic pointed at an angle towards the neck/body joint while the Freshman works best with the mic pointed at an angle towards the bridge. Both methods work best with the mic 9 - 12 inches from the guitar. Both guitars need too much post recording EQ with the mic pointed at the soundhole.

A condenser mic gives a better sound IMO but you must have some way of feeding it phantom power, i.e. your souncard or a mixer. If you have then you could do a lot worse for more money than the MXL 990/991 mic pack. I got the heads up for these mics from a recording forum a while back and they are a great pair of mics for a stupidly low amunt of money even at the UK price of £100.00 ($160.00 approx). Musicians Friend are doing them at the moment for $79.00 > http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/mxl-990-991-recording-microphone-package Don't be put off by the low price. For an amateur/hobby recordist (like myself) they've turned out to be the bargain of the decade, as long as you accept that they are not going to give a result a Neumann would. The Behringer C3 is also a nice multi-pattern condenser for little money. Note that neither the MXL or the Behringer come with cables or proper cradles included in the price.

If you have to stick with a dynamic due to lack of phantom powering you might find an SM57 is better suited to acoustic guitars.

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G'day Mate,

The SM58 is designed as a live vocal microphone. To record steel string guitar and voice I use a Neumann U47 ($10,000) and Electro Voice EVRE200 ($300). These are the best mics I've found for these purposes, and the studio I work at has a very extensive range.

 

I must say that using an RE200 to record a voice is horrible, but it gives you the best steel string non colored sound. It's just real sounding.

 

For your voice however, you should consider a large diaphragm condenser. Even a cheap Chinese one would give you better results recording than an SM58. If you only want one mic, get a large diaphragm condenser. Save the SM58 for live gigs, where it's ability to amplify your voice without feeding back is it's real strength. Best of luck!

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I've got 2 Studio Project's C1s, for the price I paid there not to bad. I do have a have a nice AT 4047sv that set me back $700.00 (US) but I use the C1 most of the time because they have the same FET design. That's what a U87 has, the U87 just has many different polar pattern's and likely a better made element etc. The C1 is a Chinese made product but it's designed by the company's team in California. The Chinese worker get's penny's in pay compared to US worker's so the cost is low thus the price is low.

 

I didn't want to set up the C1 for that recording as I didn't have a mic stand in the room at the time. The C1 is delicate and if it was to fall off the tripod it would have broken for sure. The 58, well, you could toss it across the room and it would still work fine.

 

http://studioprojects.com/c1.html

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I have had good luck using a Rode N1-A condenser mike. I works great for vocals and acoustic guitar.

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For price, reliability, road-ability, and parts and service, I stick with Shure microphone products whenever possible.

 

The mic I use to record acoustic stringed instruments is the Shure SM-81 condenser mic. It's on the low end of the "professional" range, and can be picked up used for about $200. It does require "phantom Power", and is a great mic for the price with a three position adjustable frequency range/roll off.

 

As for the under $100 dynamic mics, you'd be much better off with a SM-57 for acoustic guitar than a 58. The SM-58 is specifically design with the mid-range boost for voice. The 57 has a little more of a "flat" response.

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Did a Youtube search for the Gauge mic's. Lot's of adds but no real audio so your guess is a s good as mine.

 

 

Yep, I ran into the same wall. The only clips I found were on their website.

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The SM58 is a great mic which I think is better suited to vocals but you can get good results with acoustics. You may have tried this but, if you haven't, it's worth experimenting with the mic position. I have a six string Yamaha and a twelve string Freshman. The Yamaha records best with the mic pointed at an angle towards the neck/body joint while the Freshman works best with the mic pointed at an angle towards the bridge. Both methods work best with the mic 9 - 12 inches from the guitar. Both guitars need too much post recording EQ with the mic pointed at the soundhole.

A condenser mic gives a better sound IMO but you must have some way of feeding it phantom power, i.e. your souncard or a mixer. If you have then you could do a lot worse for more money than the MXL 990/991 mic pack. I got the heads up for these mics from a recording forum a while back and they are a great pair of mics for a stupidly low amunt of money even at the UK price of £100.00 ($160.00 approx). Musicians Friend are doing them at the moment for $79.00 > http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/mxl-990-991-recording-microphone-package Don't be put off by the low price. For an amateur/hobby recordist (like myself) they've turned out to be the bargain of the decade, as long as you accept that they are not going to give a result a Neumann would. The Behringer C3 is also a nice multi-pattern condenser for little money. Note that neither the MXL or the Behringer come with cables or proper cradles included in the price.

If you have to stick with a dynamic due to lack of phantom powering you might find an SM57 is better suited to acoustic guitars.

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You might be on to something here.

 

I always point the mic at the sound hole and close to it. Barring getting a different mic right now I'll experiment with placing the SM-58 as you suggest and see what happens. It makes sense really. Thanks!

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Go for condenser mics. There are a lot for different budget ranges.

 

I'd suggest a small diaphragm condenser. Get the Behringer C-2 or C-4. Perhaps a Samson C0-2. They come in pairs, so you can experiment with stereo, or dual mic placements. Of course, there are more expensive ones if you like.

 

You would need a mic preamp with +48v phantom power. Presonus sells some that are reasonably priced. Or perhaps your audio interface already has a nice mic preamp to begin with.

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Guest BentonC

The SM58 is a great mic which I think is better suited to vocals but you can get good results with acoustics. You may have tried this but, if you haven't, it's worth experimenting with the mic position. I have a six string Yamaha and a twelve string Freshman. The Yamaha records best with the mic pointed at an angle towards the neck/body joint while the Freshman works best with the mic pointed at an angle towards the bridge. Both methods work best with the mic 9 - 12 inches from the guitar. Both guitars need too much post recording EQ with the mic pointed at the soundhole.

A condenser mic gives a better sound IMO but you must have some way of feeding it phantom power, i.e. your souncard or a mixer. If you have then you could do a lot worse for more money than the MXL 990/991 mic pack. I got the heads up for these mics from a recording forum a while back and they are a great pair of mics for a stupidly low amunt of money even at the UK price of £100.00 ($160.00 approx). Musicians Friend are doing them at the moment for $79.00 > http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/mxl-990-991-recording-microphone-package Don't be put off by the low price. For an amateur/hobby recordist (like myself) they've turned out to be the bargain of the decade, as long as you accept that they are not going to give a result a Neumann would. The Behringer C3 is also a nice multi-pattern condenser for little money. Note that neither the MXL or the Behringer come with cables or proper cradles included in the price.

If you have to stick with a dynamic due to lack of phantom powering you might find an SM57 is better suited to acoustic guitars.

 

Good tips. This is a great opportunity to experiment with mic placement and try to master the equipment that you have!

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For sure mic placement , try 12th fret, or bridge area , different angles, an assistant here is a big help. Sometimes a half inch makes all the difference.

a sm57 is a must have , just get one you'll use it the rest of your life, it's a no brainer for any mic locker.

And great for the not so perfact room.

 

Have a killer sounding room? LDc mics are great, less gain hungry mics with lots of detail. But good ones cost a bunch. Same with small diagram condencers.

 

Like ribbons on acoustic as well, cascades fat head is a good value, however ribbon mic s need

A bunch of gain so a good high gain mic pre is needed there.

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For sure mic placement , try 12th fret, or bridge area , different angles, an assistant here is a big help. Sometimes a half inch makes all the difference.

a sm57 is a must have , just get one you'll use it the rest of your life, it's a no brainer for any mic locker.

And great for the not so perfact room.

 

Have a killer sounding room? LDc mics are great, less gain hungry mics with lots of detail. But good ones cost a bunch. Same with small diagram condencers.

 

Like ribbons on acoustic as well, cascades fat head is a good value, however ribbon mic s need

A bunch of gain so a good high gain mic pre is needed there.

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