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Deadgrateful

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Happy Easter holidays everyone! So I thought I'd treat myself to a new guitar book (I don't much get on with online resources and dvd's) but I'm struggling to decide what to go with.

 

I figured it might be a worth while idea to have everyone list their must have guitar books (perhaps under a beginner, intermediate and advanced tag).

 

I guess I'll start with Mel Bay's 'Guitar Cross Picking Technique' (intermediate to advanced). This is an absolute gem for anyone venturing into the world of cross picking.

 

Oh and don't feel restricted to books focusing on acoustic playing.

 

So, what should I get?

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See if you can find a copy of Gibson's Teaching Method For Guitar originally published in 1939 and still a great series of books. I see them on eBay all the time.

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Banner Gibsons: The Story of the Flattop Guitars of 1942-45 and the Extraordinary Women (and a Few Men) Who Built Them (Michigan State University Press, in press, forthcoming, 2012).

 

OK, it's more history book than guitar book. But, still ...

 

:)

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Banner Gibsons: The Story of the Flattop Guitars of 1942-45 and the Extraordinary Women (and a Few Men) Who Built Them (Michigan State University Press, in press, forthcoming, 2012).

 

OK, it's more history book than guitar book. But, still ...

 

:)

You'll have to let us know when its printed and bound, and ready for sale !

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re music and musicians.

 

Elijah Wald, Escaping the Delta. Very perceptive take on RJs legacy and the roots of the Blues. Fun bit: Muddy Waters to Dave Van Ronk after the latter's bombasitic Hootchie Coothcie Man "Son, that's a funny song."

Robert Gordon. It Came from Memphis. Short on Elvis, long on the Memphis underground: Alex Chilton, Furry Lewis, Jim Dickinson, Lee Baker, Mud Boy & the Neutrons.

Stanley Booth. Rhythm Oil. If only for the essay on Charlie Freeman..

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My favorite Gibson reference book is without a doubt " THE OTHER BRANDS OF GIBSON " by Mr. Paul Fox. This book delves into the dusty shelves of old music stores of the past, and takes you on a ride through obscure literature and advertising of the Great Depression era and beyond. I have read this beautiful book cover to cover at least five times and always bump into something that I hadn't noticed in my previous meanderings. It's available at Amazon.com, and well worth every nickel. I spend at least a half hour a day leafing through this treasure.

 

I also may just pick up a gem at a garage sale or flea market that previously would have been unknown to me as a Gibson creation. I'm almost sure that it will more than pay for itself in the long run.

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Banner Gibsons: The Story of the Flattop Guitars of 1942-45 and the Extraordinary Women (and a Few Men) Who Built Them (Michigan State University Press, in press, forthcoming, 2012).

 

OK, it's more history book than guitar book. But, still ...

 

:)

 

We're waiting, JT......... [biggrin]

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re music and musicians.

 

Elijah Wald, Escaping the Delta. Very perceptive take on RJs legacy and the roots of the Blues.

 

I'll second Rambler's recommendation of "Escaping the Delta" (and any other book by Elijah Wald).

 

If you're interested in a legal take on Robert Johnson's legacy, I immodestly recommend my own "The Devil and Mr. Johnson: A Bluesman's Cultural Legacy at an Intellectual Property Crossroads."

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You'll have to let us know when its printed and bound, and ready for sale !

 

We're waiting, JT......... [biggrin]

 

Thanks, gents. The manuscript is now being reviewed by a few leading historians at universities around the country. Then, presuming they give it a thumbs up, editing and graphics work begins. I've asked for a projection of when it will appear in bookstores. I'll keep you all posted.

 

Thanks, again, for the interest.

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the Keith Richards Autobiography is a great read

 

Dont read many tales of the Dinosaurs, but Keith's is a good 'un. Clappers too. And Waymore's 'as told to' Lenny Kaye.

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Ha Ha Ha!

 

 

I think a few (Lot) of the forum members should read Stephen King's "Needful Things" if they have not already.

 

 

Ha! Ha! Ha! Some fairly recognizable symptoms in the characters of the book: the olde antique shoppe with a twist - you walk in and spy a 'needful thing' and you are entranced......

 

 

Synopsis<BR xmlns:fo="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Format">For readers of the horror genre, Needful Things: The Last Castle Rock Story by Stephen King is a must-read. This horror novel begins with a mysterious stranger opening up a curio store named ‘Needful Things’ in a town called Castle Rock. Soon, strange things begin to happen, such as tires getting slashed and windows being broken, which then cascades into mayhem and bloodshed. In this novel, Stephen King creates a nightmarish environment. Needful Things: The Last Castle Rock Story became an extremely popular horror novel in the nineties, and was also made into a Hollywood movie that was directed by Fraser Heston.

 

 

 

BluesKing777.

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