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Gibson Classical Guitars


BluesKing777

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After playing my recently renovated 70's Takamine classical guitar for the Easter Weekend, of course the next question is about Gibson Classical Guitars!!!!! GAS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

I read a few old posts with KSDaddy and his Gibson C-6, but there is not a lot of information/stories getting about.

 

Anybody currently playing the classical Gibbo C-0, C-1 etc?

 

I get the picture that they are possibly more like a budget LG-0? Duds?

 

Any stories? I had heard of Martin classical guitars eg Trigger, but for the life of me never, ever heard of a Gibson until I looked.......

 

 

BluesKing777.

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After playing my recently renovated 70's Takamine classical guitar for the Easter Weekend, of course the next question is about Gibson Classical Guitars!!!!! GAS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

I read a few old posts with KSDaddy and his Gibson C-6, but there is not a lot of information/stories getting about.

 

Anybody currently playing the classical Gibbo C-0, C-1 etc?

 

I get the picture that they are possibly more like a budget LG-0? Duds?

 

Any stories? I had heard of Martin classical guitars eg Trigger, but for the life of me never, ever heard of a Gibson until I looked.......

 

 

BluesKing777.

Gibson C-series guitars are for the most part budget instruments.

 

There are a couple of interesting Gibson Classicals that are out there that merit attention. Gibson made 25 Classicals for the Ray Stevens estate. These were exceptional guitars and have dissappeared into the ether. I would love to see and hear one again. I played one before it was shipped and it was a very nice guitar. They also made several prototypes for Christopher Parkening. Parkening had a deal with Ramirez and he wouldn't even look at them. A few were sold around the Bozeman area but I can't locate them at this point in time. They were solid Brazilian and copied to the Rameriz spec. Very good classicals indeed. Kevin Kopp was in charge of the project.At this point I should mention that Parkening had moved his masters class to Bozeman as he loved to fish and had a summer home here.

 

When Gibson first started production in the early 90'a they also were the distributor for Ramirez Classicals. The relationship lasted a couple of years and then Gibson terminated the deal. None of the above instruments had anything to do with your original question I just thought it would be some fun info to share. Didn't mean to hijack the thread.

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Just as many of you chaps like to stick with American instruments when it comes to steel strings, perhaps you should stick with Spain for your nylons. Though of course the Japanese also make some very fine classicals. Ask Matt Sears for real advice, BK - though perhaps given your playing priorities, you might nudge him to go beyond suggesting local luthier-built specials. Matt?!

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Thanks everyone, very interesting.

 

 

I had an inkling........No pain-stick to Spain we are told. Si, Amigos!

 

 

It is just a touch of the fever - the guitar fund is collapsing from car trouble.

 

 

They seem to be fairly rare on the internet....

 

 

 

BluesKing777.

 

 

 

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After playing my recently renovated 70's Takamine classical guitar for the Easter Weekend, of course the next question is about Gibson Classical Guitars!!!!! GAS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

I read a few old posts with KSDaddy and his Gibson C-6, but there is not a lot of information/stories getting about.

 

Anybody currently playing the classical Gibbo C-0, C-1 etc?

 

I get the picture that they are possibly more like a budget LG-0? Duds?

 

Any stories? I had heard of Martin classical guitars eg Trigger, but for the life of me never, ever heard of a Gibson until I looked.......

 

 

BluesKing777.

 

Hi BK

 

Congratulations on the renovation! Classical guitar is just the best!!!!

 

re the op - I played a Gibson classical several years back in London's Denmark street (not sure what model) but to be honest; wasn't overly impressed. I have also tried friends' various other brand name classicals such as Taylor, Martin and Takamine etc and what they all seemed to share - was they all seemed to lack any warmth, volume and that special something. A brand like Admira, which are a Spanish company, for only about £200 far exceeded the aforementioned.

 

Hmmm,

 

Well as far as luthiers go Britain, Spain and Germany are producing the best work IMHO, although from my limited experience with some of the luthiers from the States - there are some great guitars coming through too! People are people anywhere and I don't buy into any of the stereotypes that involve guitars being better or worse just because they were magically constructed somewhere.

 

As the guitar is from Spain, it stands to reason that the country is synonymous with quality classicals, although I would certainly argue that these days, to check out any of the guitars by Paul Fisher, Tony Johnson and Rik Middleton whose guitars are being used by a lot of concert guitarists.

 

I don't get any ££ for endorsing Rik's guitars; I do it because I believe them to be some of the finest classical guitars around today. I went to talk with Rik yesterday about my next classical and played THE BEST guitar I have played. I have commissioned a guitar based on this one, the only differences will be it is black with white/pearl binding and the cutaway is slightly more curved...

 

IMHO For mid priced guitars; big guitar companies can't be beaten for the value for money and what we the consumer receive, but for a top notch (and personal) guitar - I would always go the hand made route as I have found them to be better (for steel and nylon).

 

photo-7.jpg

 

 

578514_10150671535643191_790998190_9394937_857082511_n.jpg

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Thanks Matt.

 

 

 

I glad you ordered a different guitar and didn't buy the guitar in the photo - - the lower front bout is missing! The luthier is obviously straight out of lute building college....

 

 

 

BluesKing777.

 

oohhh bitc*y bitc*y LMAO!!!!!!!!! [lol]

 

I know 'looks' are so important on guitar forums [flapper] , but you should have heard it though, it sounded amazing and the upper fret access was very useful (not to mention comfortable) - I would have walked away with that guitar if he'd let me...and the good news for you (as you love the weird and wonderful) is my new guitar will be a very similar.

 

me and Rik jamming (both Rik Midddleton guitars)

 

photo-8.jpg

 

 

 

Matt

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oohhh bitc*y bitc*y LMAO!!!!!!!!! [lol]

 

I know 'looks' are so important on guitar forums [flapper] , but you should have heard it though, it sounded amazing and the upper fret access was very useful (not to mention comfortable) - I would have walked away with that guitar if he'd let me...and the good news for you (as you love the weird and wonderful) is my new guitar will be a very similar.

 

me and Rik jamming (both Rik Midddleton guitars)

Matt

 

 

Sorry - I fell asleep before you replied! I do live at the end of the guitar universe...

 

I wasn't being (oohhh bitc*y bitc*y LMAO!!!!!!!!!). I was kidding about the cutaway, but if you go ahead and purchase one the same you sure are going to get the same comment everywhere you play it/take it!

 

Won't the cutaway 'cutaway' some sounds?

 

What is wrong with the RM you are playing in the pic? Looks great!

 

 

BluesKing777.

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Sorry - I fell asleep before you replied! I do live at the end of the guitar universe...

 

ha ha - In guitar forum anonymity!! :) - BTW that WAS me being bit*hy (albeit with my tongue firmly in cheek LOL). Good morning to you now sir! it is I now who fell asleep (bed time beckoned yawn)

 

I wasn't being (oohhh bitc*y bitc*y LMAO!!!!!!!!!). I was kidding about the cutaway, but if you go ahead and purchase one the same you sure are going to get the same comment everywhere you play it/take it!

 

I beg to differ - but so what anyway? - I am my own man - I compose and play pieces how I see the world. I am proudly on the autistic spectrum and perhaps because of this, have come to really love and celebrate individuality perhaps more than a neurotypical person. In short, I am used to raised eyebrows - my ethos (with a smile) is always screw them :) [lol] (with the Gypsy Kings' version of My Way playing in my imagination)

 

Won't the cutaway 'cutaway' some sounds?

 

Nope - Like I have said; best 'sounding' classical I have played ... (and loudest) - plus like a flying V - amazing to be able to solo up high freely.

 

What is wrong with the RM you are playing in the pic? Looks great!

That would be my present Middleton guitar - Simply put; the other one 'sounds' and plays better [thumbup]

 

Matt

 

p.s you gotta love guitar forum he he

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(In my best French accent) "viva la difference" - some of my favourite weird and wonderful babies...

 

Hand made guitar by Roy Eneas, based on a 1939 Maccafferi model. Maccafferi was a classical guitarist and created the unique gypsy jazz sound by creating a guitar that was a kind of hybrid of a classical and steel strung guitar

Royal1.jpg

 

The Yamaha Silent Guitar. Often admired when playing out, the Yamaha silent guitar is anything but that when amplified. After admiring the sound, people often scratch their heads and wonder how a guitar with a huge hole can sound so damn good!

 

IMG_0336.jpg

 

Gibson First run Robot Guitar - Sounds splendid & very useful for orchestra pit work, as you can change tuning in between scenes! Hated by 'purists' who play guitars that other purists hated when they first came out - electric guitars - people eh?

 

IMAG0065.jpg

 

Regarded as too radical a shape when it first came out the V finally caught on and is a very comfortable guitar to play. The upper fret access for soloing is just great.

 

DSC00135.jpg

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Matt,

 

I was going to suggest you post the Yamaha until I saw it above...

 

Why don't you start a thread with it and let the purists define exactly where the tone comes from!

 

Congrats on the new guitar...

 

Regards

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My first "good" guitar was a Gibson C-0 fron 1963. It replaced the Silvertone torture device they called a guitar. It was just OK but it was mine and I played it until 1982 when I sold it to buy my Gibson F-25. It was fairly heavily built so the sound wasn't all that great. The cheap Giannini classical I have now sounds better.

The only reason I would like to still have it was that my now deceased younger brother learned to play on it.

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Wait....what?

 

Play your guitars d00ds...who cares what shape it is! :) If it sounds good to you, then play the crap outta that thing!

 

Also...hey does it smell like cork in here? I can't tell... [biggrin]

 

ha ha!!! Cheers to you John. The smell of cork is often quite strong in the acoustic section LMAO

 

My first "good" guitar was a Gibson C-0 fron 1963. It replaced the Silvertone torture device they called a guitar. It was just OK but it was mine and I played it until 1982 when I sold it to buy my Gibson F-25. It was fairly heavily built so the sound wasn't all that great. The cheap Giannini classical I have now sounds better.

The only reason I would like to still have it was that my now deceased younger brother learned to play on it.

 

Hi Grampa

 

Sorry about your brother Grampa :(

 

I have a guitar that is a nice sounding guitar, but bloody hell - is it difficult to play!! Some people get a hernia just trying to produce a 1st fret F barre chord :) - I nick name it The Beast! I have heard a lot of American forum members mention Silvertone guitars, are they/where they really that awful?

 

Matt

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I have commissioned a guitar based on this one, the only differences will be it is black with white/pearl binding and the cutaway is slightly more curved...

 

Ah, but which way, Matt? Further towards the back and convex, or concave and further towards the front? Feel free to sketch your reply here! [biggrin]

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Ah, but which way, Matt? Further towards the back and convex, or concave and further towards the front? Feel free to sketch your reply here! [biggrin]

 

[biggrin]

 

Like this Hanika guitar (German maker) - but as the earlier pic shows, the cutaway is quite a bit further down!! -

 

189033.jpg

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[biggrin]

 

Like this Hanika guitar (German maker) - but as the earlier pic shows, the cutaway is quite a bit further down!! -

 

189033.jpg

 

Aha. But with the concave cutaway, it might take a bit less getting used to. See, I also reckon that the comments are neither here nor there, especially if feel and sound are better, but it would take me some getting used to that convex look. Not outward conformism, but aesthetic habit. I have a similar thing with my Howard Roberts Fusion. The super-deep cutaway makes for great playability (at least on a guitar of the HRF's depth) and the thing sounds magnificent. When I'm playing it, looks are the last thing on my mind. When I look in the mirror, I think how handsome I look with that distinctive guitar. [woot] [woot] But in some photos of HRFs, the whole guitar looks hyper-asymmetrical. Not just in the way that all single-cut guitars are asymmetrical, but as though the bridge and neck were set nearer the upper side of the guitar. They're not, but sometimes in pictures they seem to be. The look is distinctive and interesting, but also a bit disconcerting. Funny how certain norms become ingrained.

 

Oh, and if you have no use for your old, non-cutaway Rik, I know a good home in Hungary!!!!!

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Aha. But with the concave cutaway, it might take a bit less getting used to. See, I also reckon that the comments are neither here nor there, especially if feel and sound are better, but it would take me some getting used to that convex look. Not outward conformism, but aesthetic habit. I have a similar thing with my Howard Roberts Fusion. The super-deep cutaway makes for great playability (at least on a guitar of the HRF's depth) and the thing sounds magnificent. When I'm playing it, looks are the last thing on my mind. When I look in the mirror, I think how handsome I look with that distinctive guitar. [woot] [woot] But in some photos of HRFs, the whole guitar looks hyper-asymmetrical. Not just in the way that all single-cut guitars are asymmetrical, but as though the bridge and neck were set nearer the upper side of the guitar. They're not, but sometimes in pictures they seem to be. The look is distinctive and interesting, but also a bit disconcerting. Funny how certain norms become ingrained.

 

Oh, and if you have no use for your old, non-cutaway Rik, I know a good home in Hungary!!!!!

 

The Howard Roberts guitar!! Nice [thumbup] [thumbup] I've always loved the design of that. Playing the guitar in the pic was like a weight off my mind if that makes sense - it was so nice to be able to get up those high frets - it was probably one of the loudest acoustics I have played!

 

Matt

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The Howard Roberts guitar!! Nice [thumbup] [thumbup]

 

Matt

 

Oh yes indeed. Though the symmetrical part of me still gasses for a 335.

 

A propos, there's currently a 1986 335 Studio in Budapest in cherry. Same colour as my Howard. Ebony board like the Howard. But - and here's the really cool thing from where I'm sitting - no neck binding. I could never replace the Howard, as it has unique significance to me. But the frets are beginning to wear and I can see a levelling or even replacement job on the cards. And I love the binding on it. (I like guitars with and without binding. Horses for courses.) While I could live with frets overlaying it, I'd really like to keep the nibs and everything in tact. This could prove an expensive desire on a guitar which is definitely a player. But if I were a rich man (Daidle deedle daidle Daidle daidle deedle daidle dum), then I'd have the Studio as a workhorse, since the unbound frets can be replaced more cheaply and easily. Just to take a bit of the strain off the Howard. But then, the acoustic has been doing that for a while anyway. Ah, GAS - and then there's Classical GAS as well...

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Gibson C6 Classical:

 

 

 

Wow!

 

 

 

This got the blood rushin':

 

 

http://www.ebay.com/...=item4cffb49055

 

 

 

 

BluesKing777.

 

BK,

 

I am curious, wont you be bothered that everywhere you "play it/take it", that people will see it is a Gibson (and not a proper classical guitar builder) - and think it's rubbish? They are a bit of a laughing stock in the classical guitar world you know? (as are the other big brands such as Taylor Martin etc) - the general consensus is that they can build half decent steel strung guitars, but their nylon guitars are very poor.

 

Or...

 

would you think screw them! I like it - so to hell with what those closed minds think!? I know where I stand; but given your earlier views I am intrigued...

 

Matt

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