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$500,000.00 Flying V


daveinspain

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I like how the guy's strap has metal on it, as if he doesn't care if he puts "modern" scratches on the guitar. And $2,500 for shipping? Is this guy flying out to bring it to you? Nice Korina tho.... Just a bit out of my range... IMHO of course.

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Gruhn used to have the 57 prototype of this for 1,000,000 in a glass case in the store for a long time.

 

That's a lot of money. Wonder if he got the million for it or accepted a reasonable offer.

 

It's a rare guitar as just under 100 were made in 58-59.

 

Despite the fact that the pickups alone are worth a good few thousand each and the fact that it was owned by the late, great Ronnie Montrose and despite the fact that it was also 1 of only 100 made in those years, that doesn't change the fact that it's just another flying v as far as I'm concerned.

 

Yes, the instrument has a lot of history, but for that kind of money, I could furnish a home studio with all the guitars I could ever possibly need and have enough to wine, dine and buy something pretty for my wife time and time again. But then again, it's just my opinion. I could do all those things, or I could buy a guitar that is going to sit in it's case until I try and flip it for a profit.

 

I'm sorry, but I'm just having a hard time accepting that a guitar is worth that amount. Sure, I've drooled over 59's time and time again, but I'd never spend that amount of money on a guitar... Especially not a V. [biggrin]

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That's a lot of money. Wonder if he got the million for it or accepted a reasonable offer.

 

 

 

Despite the fact that the pickups alone are worth a good few thousand each and the fact that it was owned by the late, great Ronnie Montrose and despite the fact that it was also 1 of only 100 made in those years, that doesn't change the fact that it's just another flying v as far as I'm concerned.

 

Yes, the instrument has a lot of history, but for that kind of money, I could furnish a home studio with all the guitars I could ever possibly need and have enough to wine, dine and buy something pretty for my wife time and time again. But then again, it's just my opinion. I could do all those things, or I could buy a guitar that is going to sit in it's case until I try and flip it for a profit.

 

I'm sorry, but I'm just having a hard time accepting that a guitar is worth that amount. Sure, I've drooled over 59's time and time again, but I'd never spend that amount of money on a guitar... Especially not a V. [biggrin]

 

 

 

If it sells for that much it was worth that much. If not, it wasn't.

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Back in the 70's when these things were getting noticed as possibly being historically significant someday, we didn't hesitate to call a crappy example of 56 les paul a crappy example. The first bunch of late 50's strats and teles and Les Pauls I ever played in my pre-teen life were just mediocre guitars at best. Sure, one or two may have been pretty swell. But 900 dollars for a beat up strat? All of them weren't worth 900 dollars.

 

Today, everything is priceless and of incredible intrinsic value, because it has to be. As soon as you start actually ascribing actual useful value to these things, all the others become suspect, and everyone(the dealers) starts losing money fast. Keep them mojos comin, keep insisting it is worth a mint, just repeat that it is worth half a mil enough times and it will be worth a half a mil. It is, after all, a guitar that not many people were very much interested in the first time around, that they knocked off in the 70's to maybe a tad more interest, and they continue knocking off today to the satisfaction of that <whatever> percent of the guitar buying public that likes Vs. It's just a guitar, and anything else is bloviation to make the buyer feel good. Except them pickups, them I'd like to have.

 

rct

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Maybe to someone, but not universally. A huge Montrose fan will probably pay that kind of money. Does it really mean it was worth that much?

 

 

If it sells for half a million than it was worth half a million.

 

The money that changes hands from buyer to seller is the only thing in the universe that determines the cash value of the thing.

 

All we can do is watch and see.

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Now, unless I've gone senile and telescoped time considerably, it wasn't that long ago that these were selling for around $60,000. Even assuming that there may be a number of big Montroese fans who would pay extra for its provenence, the number of Montrose fans with over, say, $100,000 in spare cash must be pretty limited. This is where the "collectors" market finally becomes entirely divorced from musicians.

 

As several posters have pointed out, after all's said and done, IT'S STILL A FLYING V - kind of a fun guitar for it's looks, but I dont think anyone would claim that is has the best tone of any vintage gibson, or the best playabilty. There is a reason why they only sold a few hundred, just as there is a reason why they only sold a few of the '61 "sideways" vibrato units, or a few S1s, or RD artists. The reason is not "because it was brilliantly ahead of it's time."

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I agree that the MOST accurate book to determine value is the checkbook.

 

Aside from that, I can see an argument that regardless of what you pay for it, what it would really be worth, the money you have in your hand, is what you can SELL it for.

 

The link to the Albert King/Richard Gere guitar might be a good measuring stick, but one would have to know also what the proof/provenance is that the guitar actually belonged to Mr. King. If it is solid, then THAT guitar would certainly be more desirable than this one I would think.

 

I have a few questions about this one concerning the red around the pup rings and ferrels, and the amount of checking. I wouldn't say from here it is likely a refin, but I would want to be sure. Often, when a guitar is sprayed over at some point in the past, it tends to check a lot more sometimes.

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