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Yes They Are The Eggmen


J.R.M.30!

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Yes they were very succesful but song content was not there best suit.

 

 

Not there when? In 64 when they set the world on fire? Not there when Let it be and Across the Universe was written - both incredibly deep meaningful songs?

 

Or did you mean their?

 

KooKoo Kachoo.

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You have way too much time on your hands. How can anybody with any worth or responsibility take any time out of their lives to write stupid threads as this? Obviously you are holding grudges with people in this forum and you have nothing better to do with your time than to troll. I bet you spend even more time making computer viruses too. [lol]

 

You are now on ignore so I don't have to read anymore of your nonsense.

 

 

Yup....

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untitled.jpg

I love this snap! 'Train Wreck; Gare Montparnasse, 1895'. Thanks for reminding me about it, ChanMan! It was used in a lecture I attended(*) on early examples of Photojournalism as the newspapers of the time had recently married the new-fangled 'faster-speed emulsions' in photography with dot-screen half-tone lithography showing that, truly, "One picture can speak a thousand words".

 

[thumbup]

 

Anyhow, lets get this train wreck of a thread back on-line (Ho! Ho! Ho!)...

 

Trainwreckbackoncourse.jpg

 

P.

 

(*) Not when the image was current, I hasten to add.....

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Wow! I hadn't seen that before, Searcy.

 

I wonder if the photographer was credited on the album sleeve-notes?............

 

:-k

 

P.

Copyright law is a bit complex in this area, but basically, anything published in a foreign country before 1923 is not covered by US Copyright law, and the photograph is in the public domain. Sill would have been nice to give the guy a credit though.....

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I love this snap! 'Train Wreck; Gare Montparnasse, 1895'. Thanks for reminding me about it, ChanMan! It was used in a lecture I attended(*) on early examples of Photojournalism as the newspapers of the time had recently married the new-fangled 'faster-speed emulsions' in photography with dot-screen half-tone lithography showing that, truly, "One picture can speak a thousand words".

 

[thumbup]

 

Anyhow, lets get this train wreck of a thread back on-line (Ho! Ho! Ho!)...

 

Trainwreckbackoncourse.jpg

 

P.

 

(*) Not when the image was current, I hasten to add.....

 

 

This is a fascinating post! I, too, am now glad I posted this pic :D!!

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Copyright law is a bit complex in this area, but basically, anything published in a foreign country before 1923 is not covered by US Copyright law, and the photograph is in the public domain. Sill would have been nice to give the guy a credit though.....

TBH, Martin, the snapper would have been 'only' a staff photographer for the paper and wouldn't even have been credited at the time, never mind a century later. Many of these iconic shots have now been bought by the Getty Picture Library. They have a virtual monopoly in the market.

 

This is a fascinating post! I, too, am now glad I posted this pic :D!!

Me too!

 

My curiosity having been piqued, I tried to find out more about the photograph.

 

Here's what Wikipedia has to say about it;

 

"The Gare Montparnasse became famous for a derailment on 22 October 1895 of the Granville - Paris Express that overran the buffer-stop. The engine careened across almost 30 metres (100 ft) of the station concourse, crashed through a 60-centimetre (2 ft) thick wall, shot across a terrace and smashed out of the station, plummeting onto the Place de Rennes 10 metres (33 ft) below, where it stood on its nose. Two of the 131 passengers sustained injuries, along with the fireman and two conductors. The only fatality was a woman on the street below who was killed by falling masonry. The accident was caused by a faulty Westinghouse brake and the engine drivers who were trying to make up for lost time. A conductor was given a 25 franc fine and the engine driver a 50 franc fine."

 

Back on topic; Macca could, perhaps, write a song about it and call it "Get Back"...or maybe "O Bla Di Hell..."

 

P.

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Was the woman killed named Eleanor Rigby?

 

 

Just a thought.....

LOL!

 

I knew she picked up the rice in the church where a wedding has been. Perhaps she also carried the bride's train?

 

P.

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