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Does a 'good beating' help the opening process ?


EuroAussie

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We had a great gig last nite, which comprised of a pretty hard and driving set list on most part. I played the SJ and must admit I drove it pretty hard.

 

When I got home I played a bit more and this morning and was surprised how it sounded even more open than before. I had this feeling a few times after a gig where I dug in a lot.

 

Made me think that acoustics seem to thrive on getting a good spankin' every now and then.

 

I get the impression it really helps the opening process.

 

What do you think, does a good spankin' aid the opening process ?

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When I pick up the git, I always play a three chord progression of D, Em,G.... over and over, and play a little harder each cycle. After 3-5mins every piece of grain in the wood is vibin'. Tune up and do it again, until the barbeque is done. If the git will stay in tune after being thoroughly smacked, its ready for freddie and able for mable.

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Didn't realize there were so many physicists trolling around these pages. It's an interesting theory, lent creedence by your own ears. Newer tonewoods probably do open up after some steady vibrating. It could be that your humidified guitars shed some of their moisture as you go through the gig and you're hearing a crispier soundboard. Do you notice that the effect goes away after a day or so? My guitars behave the opposite way, though I'm not complaining. The early morning at my house is cool and I get the best tone out of them at that time, especially in deep winter when the house is bone dry and chilly. They soften up through the day and I don't get the jump off the pick, but they're all at least 45 years old.

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I find afterwards the difference is even more noticeable in delicate softer play,

Absolutely agree with PM. Not least the quoted line. Take an E one octave up and explode in a splash. Put on capo from the 7th fret and down, then whip your way through the common chords. We want every available frequency to reach and activate the top and back – sides, neck and headstock, , , the whole thing. It's all about the meeting between those 2. Vibes and material - and about the guitar being able to recognize the players touch.

Don't be afraid to go a little 'Townshend', but not too often – the instrument might be shocked into an over-break-in (which means hollow).

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Absolutely agree with PM. Not least the quoted line. Take an E one octave up and explode in a splash. Put on capo from the 7th fret and down, then whip your way through the common chords. We want every available frequency to reach and activate the top and back – sides, neck and headstock, , , the whole thing. It's all about the meeting between those 2. Vibes and material - and about the guitar being able to recognize the players touch.

Don't be afraid to go a little 'Townshend', but not too often – the instrument might be shocked into an over-break-in (which means hollow).

This is the best description of Foreplay that I Have ever heard...

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A higher action, heavier guage strings, driving thumb rhythm, hit it harder on the 2nd and 4th beat, and keep the right hand loose to move from hitting sharp notes near the bridge to wide open chords hit north of the soundhole.

 

The thing about Gibsons is they have the best percussive bass in the business - one of the main reasons I have stuck with them for so many decades. Ya ain't goin' to get the most that guitar has got to give though unless you get a bit aggressive with the thing.

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You guys are stoked on this topic. There might even be some passive aggressive tendencies at play. Imagine...beatin' down on our 'beloved', our soul portal, that beautiful extension of who we are ( or who we want to be ). Even if I had definative scientific proof that the tone changed not after a good shaking, I wouldn't drop it in on this group. We could put together a list of subtle seemingly disconnected conditions that would fine tune or flatten tone, and I think this particular one holds true. I have a great sounding Martin flat top that appears to me to have quite a lot of lacquer on it. Never refinished, gorgeous ambering, but it looks like a couple passes too many with the spray gun. Beautiful, but still real glossy for it's age. I feel it still hasn't opened up and I often wonder how it would sound with a finer, thinner finish, but you can bet I'll be hitting it harder for a while...wishing and hoping. If I see checking I'll know I'm getting somewhere.

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I was away for three days last week. Just before I left my guitar (played every day) sounded awesome. Then when I took it out of its case after three days the sound was not really there. After a couple of songs it started to come back.

 

Was it real what I was hearing? Or in my head, me getting used to the sound again after a few days? It's a mystery to me...

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Mabye in this case it was yourself, rather than the guitar warming up after a break of a few days... ?

 

I was away for three days last week. Just before I left my guitar (played every day) sounded awesome. Then when I took it out of its case after three days the sound was not really there. After a couple of songs it started to come back.

 

Was it real what I was hearing? Or in my head, me getting used to the sound again after a few days? It's a mystery to me...

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We had a great gig last nite, which comprised of a pretty hard and driving set list on most part. I played the SJ and must admit I drove it pretty hard.

 

When I got home I played a bit more and this morning and was surprised how it sounded even more open than before. I had this feeling a few times after a gig where I dug in a lot.

 

Made me think that acoustics seem to thrive on getting a good spankin' every now and then.

 

I get the impression it really helps the opening process.

 

What do you think, does a good spankin' aid the opening process ?

 

Do you know about the Tone Rite?

I have one and I use it. Amazing device. I love it. If you can-try one.

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It's a mystery to me...

Yeahh, we've been there before and a lot of forumites have the opinion it's a 2 way situation. I'm on that squad. Your Bird might have been resting a little.

Then again, , , 3 days isn't much - enough though it seems.

Did you say mystery. . .

 

 

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Never used a tone rite, but from all the before and after samples ive heard i preferred the before tone. I found the tone rite made the guitar brighter and harsher sounding than it was earlier. Ill pass on this approach and probably give the Gibbys a good spankin' now and then.

 

Do you know about the Tone Rite?

I have one and I use it. Amazing device. I love it. If you can-try one.

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