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Gibson Acoustic..some questions..


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A few days ago I tried a new Gibson J200 Standard...(Seemed responsive but not as musical with sweet highs as the one I have).

But when did they go to that thin neck with a nearly flat fingerboard?

 

The other guitar I tried was a J45 Vine Koa Custom Shoppe,a few years old,but as unused as can be, with exactly the same unplayable factory set up that it came with.

The guitar sounded as deaf as the only other J45 Vine (an early Rosewood one) I tried ..It sounded just like a Norlin 1970's Gibson Acoustic.

 

Maybe the guys in the Custom Shoppe are good at inlay but not putting the time into making responsive guitars..?

Another Custom Shoppe J200 Madagascar I tried a few years ago was beautifull,but no good either..!!

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Not sure on the original question of when they went to the neck shape and fretboard you refer to. I will say that the neck is fatter and much more comfortable than my late 2010 J-45 standard. As I remember it, the neck was similar in feel to a 1950's ltd run J-200 that Gibson did a few years back (sorry I don't remember the specific model, just that I think there were 100 produced). Of course it has been a couple of weeks since I've played that particular guitar and I haven't had the opportunity to A/B it next to my J-200 STD.

 

To my ears all 3 guitars mentioned sing and growl quite beautifully.

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I can go into a music store and if they are available play two Birds or two J45s. And this has happened, one guitar will be lively and have sweet tones and the other will be dead and do "Thud" sounds when you hit he open E.

 

I imagine this is the result of set ups, and environment.

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I can go into a music store and if they are available play two Birds or two J45s. And this has happened, one guitar will be lively and have sweet tones and the other will be dead and do "Thud" sounds when you hit he open E.

 

I imagine this is the result of set ups, and environment.

 

Thanks

The thud description pretty much says it perfectly.

Evidently the original owner traded it (45 Vine) in and took a Martin D41. A shame that the person would feel impelled to unload such a luxury ornate guitar that he paid so much for to take home a Plain Jane.Shame on Gibson for putting such a dead guitar to a customer.

The Spruce top really looked exceptional on the Vine 45..but that wood may be denser requiring a thinner thickness, and the Custom Shoppe may not be attending to that on an individual basis..instead following a set recipe .

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Not sure on the original question of when they went to the neck shape and fretboard you refer to. I will say that the neck is fatter and much more comfortable than my late 2010 J-45 standard. As I remember it, the neck was similar in feel to a 1950's ltd run J-200 that Gibson did a few years back (sorry I don't remember the specific model, just that I think there were 100 produced). Of course it has been a couple of weeks since I've played that particular guitar and I haven't had the opportunity to A/B it next to my J-200 STD.

 

To my ears all 3 guitars mentioned sing and growl quite beautifully.

 

Thanks

Old strings really has more to do with it all than one would expect. But that Vine seemed well beyond dead string thud.

The hallmark of a Gibson is that Radius..going to a Martin Flatness I dont like really.Though I love it on Martins.

Take Care

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It is my understanding that Gibson has stuck with their traditional 12" radius although I guess since they are putting compound radius boards on guitars like some of the Songwriters it is not unconceivable that other guitars might get the same treatment. If they did though I would be willing to be that Gibson would advertise it.

 

I would agree that the Gibson Custom Shop does seem to spend alot of time adding a whole lot of bling to guitars. I would think the reasoning is that these would sell quicker than say producing a line of guitars from the 1955 catalog which would also be fairly costly as they would require a non-standard production nut width, top bracing and such.

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