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New ES335 Block Inlay A String Buzz


aquat26

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Hi,

I've had an ES335 Block Inlay for about two weeks now. When I got it from the store it was ok but I took it to a luthier for set up. When I got it back the action was nice and low but it had a terrible buzz on the A string when fretted anywhere. The luthier raised the action again but it's still there only on the A string. Does anybody have any ideas or opinions about about why this very annoying problem persists?

Thanks in adavance.

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.

Loosen the A string so you can take it out of the slot.

Take small piece of paper, fold it over once and stick it in the A nut slot.

Put the string back in the A slot on top of the paper shim and tune up.

If the buzz is gone or reduced, you've confirmed the slot is too deep.

 

To raise the slot depth, take some super-glue (cyanoacrylate) mixed with a bit of baking soda and put it in the slot. Let it harden and then file the slot to the depth you want. Really, it's an old players trick.

 

If you're not that adventurous, take it into a good shop/luthier (not the shop/luthier that you've been using), and have them do it, or have them install a new nut with slots cut to the correct depths (nut replacement should be relatively inexpensive).

 

 

.

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Is it a big problem if the nut is cut to deep? Would it have to be replaced?

 

NO....., a qualified guitar tech will know the procedure to fill and re-cut an existing nut. Most will recommend a more expensive (and more profitable) nut replacement, but it is not necessary.

 

I know it is just speculation here on this post, but a nut that is "cut too deep" is a rare occurrence. There are many elements involved in a proper guitar setup, and a proper order of procedure. Your guitar should have never left the shop with the problem you describe.

 

I also question the competency of the guitar tech you used.

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if the A string buzzes when played anywhere, it isn't the nut. That would only be the case if it buzzed played open and went away when fretted.

 

If the A string is the only string buzzing compared to the others, it is likely the bridge saddle for the A string is lower than the others. Not every "luthier" addresses the bridge saddles, depending on his level of sophistication. A "luthier" is a guitar builder, a "tech" services guitars. Generally, both should be able to address the issue if you are paying him good money, but some weekend warrior "techs" who do it on the side might not be too hip to the problem as the TOM bridge seldon requires attention.

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Thanks for the replies everybody. The person who did the "set up" claims that it is bridge that is causing it. I didn't mention that on this thread at the start as I didn't want to influence your responses. He claims that the bridge has a manufacturing defect and I should make a claim through Gibson. I disagree with this as I played it in the store and at home for three days without buzz before taking it to him. Also the very experienced guitar sales people played it in store when I bought it and it was fine. On top of that my guitar teacher with 20 years experience played it before I took it to the tech and there was no buzz. It was only after I took it to the "tech" that the buzz started. Very frustrating. Thanks for your replies, I'm interested in hearing more.

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I would recommend just getting a clean start and have a tech (or you could easily do this yourself) measure the relative string heights at the saddle with an understring radius gauge. Your guitar fretboard is most likely a 12" radius. This is literally a 30 second operation and if they charge you anything more than their bare minimum to even touch an instrument it would be price gouging.

 

If you further authorize them to make a correction if the A string saddle is determined to be too low he could install and notch a new saddle to the proper depth.

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Thanks for the replies everybody. The person who did the "set up" claims that it is bridge that is causing it. I didn't mention that on this thread at the start as I didn't want to influence your responses. He claims that the bridge has a manufacturing defect and I should make a claim through Gibson. I disagree with this as I played it in the store and at home for three days without buzz before taking it to him. Also the very experienced guitar sales people played it in store when I bought it and it was fine. On top of that my guitar teacher with 20 years experience played it before I took it to the tech and there was no buzz. It was only after I took it to the "tech" that the buzz started. Very frustrating. Thanks for your replies, I'm interested in hearing more.

The only thing you can get from here are ideas on what it COULD be....none of us have the guitar in front of us to be able to see what the ACTUAL cause is, and that means we can on guess with ideas on why it seemed fine before and isn't now.

 

It is fixable, it is just a matter deciding on who to do it and getting it done. If the guy who you took it to is not a Gibson athorized repair guy, he can't make a claim for you on any defective parts. It becomes difficult for Gibson or anyone to pay out or replace parts because not only do they not have verification of the problem but they can't verify if he is possibly doing something to cause the problem. Not that he is, just not fair to expect Gibson to be able to help.

 

If you suspect (as your "repair guy" says) it is a problem from the factory and you want it dealt with, You should take it to a Gibson authorized repair place. If not that, take it to the dealer and have them look at it or refer you to an authorized repair place. Or call them.

 

The advantage of that is an "authorised" or "approved" repair guy will not only be able to help with a claim on your behalf, but any work he does will still retain your warrenty. The guy you took it to might not be incompetent, but doing you a favor by not working further on your guitar causing more problems for you down the road.

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Personal 0.02 herewith :blink:

 

I had something parallel with my Dot a couple of years ago

 

Very annoying buzzes and resonances...often in different places on different days

 

I did not trust my dealer, as he has a tendency to mess with things unneccesarily

 

Much of the buzzing came from the pickup spring mountings...

 

As mentioned...this thread is largely speculative without the said instrument 'in hand'

 

Bearing in mind the 335 is an electric rather than an acoustic...a lowish action will buzz normally more or less

 

After some months mine settled in well...with a couple of string changes...and much bendy blues...

 

Today's mantra...

 

Play More...Polish Less... [thumbup]

 

Enjoy... [biggrin]

 

V

 

:-({|=

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I had a similar issue with a Les Paul. No buzz for weeks then one day it was there after a string change. It had not been to a luthier or anything done to it except change the strings with the exact brand and guage. After a lot of time spent trying to get the buzz out I finially figured out the the adjustment screw in the bridge had broken. It was not visible just looking at it and the screw even turned. It was not until I took the string off that I could tell something was not right. The screw and saddle came out in two piece. I put a new screw in the saddle and put it back together and the buzz was gone.

 

Loosen the string and check the bridge saddle.

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How can it possibly be the nut when the buzzing occurs on any fretted note? I'll never understand why many message boards are always full of posts saying "It's the nut! It's the nut!"

 

I'd recommend checking that the saddle for the A-string is seated correctly.

 

I've seen saddles that had been adjusted with full tension on the strings (owners attempted to move the saddles a significant amount). Sometimes when this is done the saddle and screw tend to buckle a tiny, tiny bit and then don't sit correctly.

 

I'd loosen the A-string and see if the saddle moves a slight amount and then restrung to pitch and see what happens.

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It's easiest to just get the buzz isolated and fixed rather than replacing parts. Sometimes it's really frustrating trying to find a buzz, but it's just a matter of finding it.

 

If it was me, I'd find out who the best luthier is in your area and just take it to him. He'll find it easily. [thumbup]

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It's a 2011 model so its an ABR bridge I think? I've had the Gibson Nashville bridge recommended to me as a possible upgrade. What do you think? How difficult is is to change the bridge? Thanks once again in advance.

The ABR bridge is a reproduction of the bridge it would have originally came with in the 60's. The NASHVILLE bridge is a more modern version with slightly more travel in the bridge saddles, and instead of using the post threaded directly into the guitar, it has bushings similar to the tailpiece that the post thread into.

 

Most people would not consider the Nashville bridge an "upgrade" for that model guitar.

 

It would also require modification to the guitar that is not reversible.

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It's easiest to just get the buzz isolated and fixed rather than replacing parts. Sometimes it's really frustrating trying to find a buzz, but it's just a matter of finding it.

 

If it was me, I'd find out who the best luthier is in your area and just take it to him. He'll find it easily. [thumbup]

Thanks for the advice. I've made an appointment to see a very good luthier in a couple of weeks. Until then I'll grin and bear it. Thanks very much.

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Loosen the string and see if the saddle moves at all!

 

I've also seen it where, for some strange reason, the string isn't sitting right in the nut. Lack of lube?... I dunno. But loosening the string and checking the saddle to make sure it's correctly seated isn't rocket science --- it's as easy as changing a string.

 

Guitars aren't anything to fear. Waiting a few weeks when you could be diagnosing and/or fixing it yourself is ridiculous.

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