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Question about rosewood


Motherofpearl

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Hey folks. I bought a mystic rosewood (j45) or some of you would love to call it an aj lol. Anyway. It's a great guitar but the sound is very dark so I'm wondering about changing pins and saddle to a more dense material will brighten her up a bit? I use elixir PBS strings so that's fine. I like the buffalo horn pins colossi offers. Anyway if you have a suggestion I would like to hear it

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Hey folks. I bought a mystic rosewood (j45) or some of you would love to call it an aj lol. Anyway. It's a great guitar but the sound is very dark so I'm wondering about changing pins and saddle to a more dense material will brighten her up a bit? I use elixir PBS strings so that's fine. I like the buffalo horn pins colossi offers. Anyway if you have a suggestion I would like to hear it

 

 

Colosi says specifically that the buffalo horn pins don't make much difference, so you might want to consider one of the bone or ivory options. You won't know how much difference it might make until you try, but it's a relatively cheap experiment. I'd go for the bone, as it's the cheapest way to find out at about $25-$35 per set.

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80/20s specifically martins will greatly enhance brightness

As for bone pins I've found them not to really dramatically change tone as much as increase volume, also lowering the action is a great way to increase brightness but the strings will be the biggest difference! It will sound amazing I've always liked the note separation that only rosewood offers but its a very dull sound compared to mahogany, add the bone pins 80/20s and drop the action and you'll have a perfect guitar in my opinion!

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Maybe you just need to fart around with your pick attack, (if you're not a fingerpicker). When you say 'dark' that's the first thing that comes to mind. Sometimes we lock into our style and try to approach tone from the equipment angle. I was noodling around with a friend's brand spankin' new D35 and silently thinking about how stiff the tone was, as he stared back waiting for me to go on glowingly about the sound. I handed it back to him and watched/listened to the transformation as he just hit the string with the tip of a stiffer, sharper pick. Very controlled, very precise. It brought the dang thing to life. I was struggling with this oversight until my pick attack got a re-up with the generous gift of a Blue Chip from Buc. It took a while to figure out how to roll the end of the pick off the string to access the sweet spot. I ended up going back to the basics of 'texture'. Now I'm back to square one and relearning. Old dog, new tricks.

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Yep the AJ is a pretty dark guitar with PB strings on it. Glad you got the sound you wanted with the 80/20s. I use them on my AJ most of the time. One cool thing about it though is that it's almost like having 2 guitars in one. Two total different personalities just by swapping strings. My Martins never changed much switching between PB and 80/20 but the AJ responds very differently.

 

Oh and congrats on the new AJ. There excellent flattops

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I think Jedzep's comment is one that is more than worth considering.

 

It's kinda like the electric pickers always looking for that magic tone through electrical add-ons, acoustic and AE pickers tend to look at strings, bridge and nut, yada yada yada.

 

So much tone comes from technique that "we" tend to ignore. Our technique gets the notes we want, so we then look for something else.

 

I remember one of the "lounge lizards" who teaches professionally in London (teaching all types of guitar, but he's an excellent classical guitarist and composer) telling of a "master" classical player who really loved the tone of the guitar a student brought to a master class. Yet when the "master" went to play it, the tone didn't transfer to his hands along with the instrument regardless of technically far superior skills.

 

Don't get me wrong, strings and the other stuff are important on any guitar, but I think we truly have a tendency to ignore the role our technique plays, whether it's a slight angle of flatpick or bare fingers, where we play on the instrument, literally some factors of how we hold the instrument...

 

Maybe it's 'cuz I'm old, but frankly my guitars, AE and "electric," are set up for playing comfort; strings are selected for playing comfort for what I plan to do with a given instrument.

 

I won't claim I'm "good," or even "skilled" (I know I ain't talented, at least in comparison to those I consider to have that blessing), but I will state that since I play each guitar somewhat differently for what I expect out of it, and often differently with the same instrument for different style choices, "tone" is something I really don't worry much about.

 

m

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