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Setup guide in Metric?


rythmking24
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Hello,

 

I'm in need of some specs for setting up a Les Paul Studio.

 

Firstly, is their an official setup guide from Gibson anywhere? I've done many a Google search, but can't find one. There are plenty from various random people, but they differ greatly, so I'd like to know what the Gibson factory specs are.

 

Secondly, I know most measurements are made in 64ths of an inch. However, my String action gauge only has measurements in mms. Specifically, .25mms and .5mms. Is this any good?

 

I'd appreciate some help please.

 

Many thanks.

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Hello,

 

I'm in need of some specs for setting up a Les Paul Studio.

 

Firstly, is their an official setup guide from Gibson anywhere? I've done many a Google search, but can't find one. There are plenty from various random people, but they differ greatly, so I'd like to know what the Gibson factory specs are.

 

Secondly, I know most measurements are made in 64ths of an inch. However, my String action gauge only has measurements in mms. Specifically, .25mms and .5mms. Is this any good?

 

I'd appreciate some help please.

 

Many thanks.

 

gibby does have a guide, go back to the main gibby page and I think its under support or such heading, but it does have a great description of setup and factory specs! 1 mm=.040" .5mm= .020" 1/8"=.125"/3mm=.120" 1/2"=.500"=12.7 mm

hope that helps!? [biggrin]

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Here's the final setup specs from a post by Dave at Gibson:

 

Here's how Gibson - Memphis does the final setup on their instruments. Its a post from Dave at Gibson:

 

Hi I'm David the final inspector at Gibson Memphis. I can give you the factory spec info. on our setups. You will need a mechanics rule to do this properly.

 

To check neck relief: fret the low E at the first and 15th fret (not 12th) reach to the 7th fret and tap string. There should be a small space between string and fret - no thicker than a piece of paper. Do the same with the high E.

ACTION: fret low E at first fret and measure the distance from the bottom of the to the top of the 15th fret. It should be 5/64". Do the same with the high E, measurement should be 3/64". Now measure the string height at the nut; underside of the string to the top of the fret. Low E and A should measure 2/64", D and G =1.5/64" and B and high E = 1/64". If string height at nut is correct, recheck string height at 12th fret with strings open. Measurement for low and high E's should be the same as measurement taken at the 15th.

 

Pickups: Fret low E at 22nd fret and measure pickup height from underside of string to point on pickup closest to string. Bridge pickup should be 3/64" (I think the 3/64" is a typo, it should be 3/32") , neck pickup should be 4/32". Fret high E at 22nd fret, distance for both pickups should be 3/32".

 

Play test: Play every string at every fret checking for buzzes. Bend High E string 1 and 1/2 steps, beginning at the sixth fret and ending at 22nd, checking for "choking" and to make sure string stays in nut notch.

 

Each 1/64 of an inch equals about 0.4 mm, so,

1/64" = 0.4 mm.

2/64" = 0.8 mm.

3/64" = 1.2 mm.

4/64" = 1.6 mm

5/64" = 2.0 mm.

6/64" = 2.4 mm.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 8 years later...

 A piece of paper  is 0.05 mm , then why they say 0.5 ?   It;s   like 5 cents of a dolar or euro and 50 cents  it;s different .  I have found schematics and layouts to build a complete amp and i can;t find a set up  les paul guide in mm  .  makes me  mad 

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18 hours ago, stasko said:

 A piece of paper  is 0.05 mm , then why they say 0.5 ?   It;s   like 5 cents of a dolar or euro and 50 cents  it;s different .  I have found schematics and layouts to build a complete amp and i can;t find a set up  les paul guide in mm  .  makes me  mad 

Careful not to confuse the American Decimal System with metric..

US machine shops use American Decimals where 1 inch is divided into 10ths, 100ths, 1000ths of an inch and so on. 0.5"= 0.5 inch would be half an inch. American machine tools, like end-mills and lathes, use the USA Standard Decimal System not Metric. Fractional inches are used by carpenters not machinists. Our US draftsmen have have to work in both fractions and Decimals depending whether working for an architect or a machine shop.

Remember USA Standard Decimal beat the crap out of the Nazi Metric..   🙂

a 6" machinist scale below..

C2105R%206-inch%201.JPG

Edited by mihcmac
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if the feeler gauge to adjust the neck relief  on a les paul is as thick as a piece of paper then it is about 0.002 inch = 0.05 mm not 0.50 mm
if the feeler is 0.005  inch then it is  about  0 .13 (0.127)  mm  not 0.50  mm   
 in Europe  they recomend 0.30mm to 0.50mm  neck relief 
  this confusion     makes  me mad  

Edited by stasko
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21 hours ago, stasko said:

if the feeler gauge to adjust the neck relief  on a les paul is as thick as a piece of paper then it is about 0.002 inch = 0.05 mm not 0.50 mm
if the feeler is 0.005  inch then it is  about  0 .13 (0.127)  mm  not 0.50  mm   
 in Europe  they recomend 0.30mm to 0.50mm  neck relief 
  this confusion     makes  me mad  

To convert MM to Decimal divide MM by 25.4

To convert Decimal to MM multiply Decimal by 25.4

914SQZTrDrL._AC_SX679_.jpg

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On 8/27/2020 at 1:54 AM, stasko said:

if the feeler gauge to adjust the neck relief  on a les paul is as thick as a piece of paper then it is about 0.002 inch = 0.05 mm not 0.50 mm
if the feeler is 0.005  inch then it is  about  0 .13 (0.127)  mm  not 0.50  mm   
 in Europe  they recomend 0.30mm to 0.50mm  neck relief 
  this confusion     makes  me mad  

 

Its easer to use the conversion factor (25.4) mentioned by mihcmac. 

A piece of paper is usually .004" inch (eg: newspaper) 

 

for .3mm = .012"

for .5mm = .019"

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