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Elmer

ES175 saddle not attached to the body

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Danny, you are my guitar hero: still doing it almost 45 years later.

 

Longer than that--I did my first paid gig in 1957.

 

Here's a photo of me in 1959--there's an L-4C in the case. I'm the short guy [wink]

 

b443c645.jpg

 

Danny W.

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I had that Jaguar for about six years and used it for a wide variety of music, including jazz. It's the only Fender I ever gigged with and I did about 1000 gigs with it.

 

You can learn more about this part of my life (and certainly more than you ever wanted to know) here:

 

My link

 

Danny W.

 

 

Danny, great, great stuff!

 

Can't believe you did "Winchester Cathedral" as a break song, however. I guess everything has its time and place......

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Longer than that--I did my first paid gig in 1957.

 

Here's a photo of me in 1959--there's an L-4C in the case. I'm the short guy [wink]

 

b443c645.jpg

 

Danny W.

 

In 1959 I was 12 years old, and still listening the the likes of the Hi-Lo's and Clyde McPhatter. I wanted to be a singer back then, not a guitar player. I turned out to be not that great at either one.

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Longer than that--I did my first paid gig in 1957.

 

Here's a photo of me in 1959--there's an L-4C in the case. I'm the short guy [wink]

 

b443c645.jpg

 

Danny W.

 

You did all that and you never wrote a book? [confused]

 

What a great life, Danny. Wishing you many more great ones, man.

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so what about, Oh I dunno, maybe a dry wall screw or two??? [razz]

 

Oyvhey!

 

Beat me to it. I was going to suggest a coupla nails. I like your suggestion better!

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Archtop bridges are typically not attached to the top. As you have found out, it's a good idea to mark the location with some masking tape.

Regular masking tape can leave a residue fairly quickly. luthiers I know recommend the blue painters tape as it can stay on for longer period of time with no residue.

Brad

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Regular masking tape can leave a residue fairly quickly. luthiers I know recommend the blue painters tape as it can stay on for longer period of time with no residue.

Brad

Pussies...I just marked it with a black marker,done, nice and easy and visible.

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Regular masking tape can leave a residue fairly quickly. luthiers I know recommend the blue painters tape as it can stay on for longer period of time with no residue.

Brad

 

This is one of those things that people worry about for no particular reason. I've been using plain old masking tape to do guitar repairs for more years than most luthiers have been around and have never had a problem.

 

We moved long distance a couple of times and I shipped all my guitars by USPS. I taped the bridges, pickguards, floaters and hinged tailpieces with masking tape. Most of the guitars were taped for at least a month, and some up to three months. I had no problem removing the tape without damage.

 

A few years ago Gibson did a warranty repair for me and returned the guitar with the bridge in the case pocket. The bridge location was precisely marked on the top with a rectangle made of masking tape. If Gibson doesn't worry about it, why should I?

 

Finally, even if it does leave residue, so what? It cleans right off without harm.

 

Danny W.

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Danny, great, great stuff!

 

Can't believe you did "Winchester Cathedral" as a break song, however. I guess everything has its time and place......

 

Thanks for the kind words.

 

You would never guess from looking at The Mellotones that the leader was the guy selecting the kitschy pop tunes while I was the one who put the blues, funk and jazz standards into our repertoire. Back then, as now, I was obsessed with the "Great American Songbook," and if were up to me, our repertoire would have been mostly tunes by Rodgers & Hart, fleshed out with stuff by Wes, Trane and Monk. We both agreed on the bossa nova stuff, though, but it was my idea to do A Taste Of Honey and Days Of Wine & Roses as bossas, stuff that's become commonplace now, but was daring back then.

 

What surprised me was how many of the current and recent tunes we did became standards over time. Winchester isn't one of them, but I estimate I played that silly riff at least 1500 times.

 

BTW, I am barely older than you, but I was quite precocious. That's probably good when you're a child--55 years later, not so much [wink]

 

Danny W.

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You did all that and you never wrote a book? [confused]

 

What a great life, Danny. Wishing you many more great ones, man.

 

I think that thread is all the book I'm ever going to write! I still have a few morechapters to post on it, so check back in six months [smile]

 

Hope you enjoyed it and thank you for the wishes. I'm working on it!

 

Danny W.

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