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Scary Scars


E-minor7

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Inspired by the dialogue in trvlr's pre-disstressed thread and in line of a previous one about 'First Dings', why not take the opportunity to post some scars, dings and disasters from here and there in the herd.

If not the worst ones, then those that really bug you, those you perhaps overcame (even like a little) and those fresh as yesterdays pie. It could work as some sort of healer, who knows.

 

I have several, but this might have been the most poignant –

 

It's the 1953 J-45, which it was fixed last fall. VintageGibsonJ-454-1.jpgWhooouu, but what a loose tooth is was.

And more threatened to click out. . . . .

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A Fender custom shop Relic Telecaster I owned for a while, truly the best Tele I've ever played, 62 style, brazilian Rosewood... sold it because I pretty much stopped playing electrics (Gretsches asie) and I got offered obscene money for it on several occasions, eventually I gave in.... I will admit to a slight annoyance at times that it was factory relic'd, however the photo does little justice to the beauty it was, even if it was fake and I was a poseur :D

 

Brazilian003.jpg

 

I briefly owned a Roadworn one as well, as I was told "Plays just like your red Tele man, you'll love it", it didn't, I didn't, I sold it... it was butchery by comparison.

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are those burn marks? yow? how does THAT happen???

 

 

I luckily, I've only had a few "Oh SH*&" things happen, been a few I wanted to have fixed properly. Finding someone to do it right is a challenge.

 

For some minor stuff, you can DIY, like a few pock marks in the top of an acoustic, which I've been able get out with a wet paper towel and a soldering iron.

Some of the details here:

 

The process works quite effectively, I was able to take out a few dents in an acoustic top that had popped up over the time I've owned it.

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Not on an acoustic.. but on my Les Paul 60s tribute... I got a stand for it and for some reason assumed it was nitro friendly... WRONG !!! Luckily I had covered the arms so the body is fine but the padded bit on the back I just didnt think and this was the result [crying] (two weeks after I got it I noticed this). Nitro can be a pain that way..

 

2012-03-07143544.jpg

2012-03-07143607.jpg

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I luckily, I've only had a few "Oh SH*&" things happen, been a few I wanted to have fixed properly. Finding someone to do it right is a challenge.

 

For some minor stuff, you can DIY, like a few pock marks in the top of an acoustic, which I've been able get out with a wet paper towel and a soldering iron.

 

The process works quite effectively, I was able to take out a few dents in an acoustic top that had popped up over the time I've owned it.

 

 

That process is on we've used for years in boatbuilding, usually using boiling water poured onto a rag. It works fine on bare wood, but I've had a lot less luck with it on finished wood. Particularly with nitro, I'd be concerned about the effect of steam on a finished surface. I'd be curious as to whether this has worked out for others on a finished guitar.

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are those burn marks? yow? how does THAT happen???

 

 

I luckily, I've only had a few "Oh SH*&" things happen, been a few I wanted to have fixed properly. Finding someone to do it right is a challenge.

 

For some minor stuff, you can DIY, like a few pock marks in the top of an acoustic, which I've been able get out with a wet paper towel and a soldering iron.

Some of the details here:

 

The process works quite effectively, I was able to take out a few dents in an acoustic top that had popped up over the time I've owned it.

This is an effective technique and used by woodworkers but he's doing it on an unfinished top. How did you get the water to penetrate through the finish? How did the finish look after you did this? Seems to me you would have a finish repair if you did this on a finished guitar.

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Inspired by the dialogue in trvlr's pre-disstressed thread and in line of a previous one about 'First Dings', why not take the opportunity to post some scars, dings and disasters from here and there in the herd.

If not the worst ones, then those that really bug you, those you perhaps overcame (even like a little) and those fresh as yesterdays pie. It could work as some sort of healer, who knows.

 

I have several, but this might have been the most poignant –

 

It's the 1953 J-45, which it was fixed last fall. VintageGibsonJ-454-1.jpgWhooouu, but what a loose tooth is was.

And more threatened to click out. . . . .

 

 

Em7, that one's a little odd in that the rest of the top, other than the odd discoloration around the neck, looks quite good. I think I would have had that missing "tooth" patched, as it creates a fragile edge that can easily lead to more problems. The rebate for the rosette creates a natural "break here" point on the top of the guitar, and that would make me nervous.

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Inspired by the dialogue in trvlr's pre-disstressed thread and in line of a previous one about 'First Dings', why not take the opportunity to post some scars, dings and disasters from here and there in the herd.

If not the worst ones, then those that really bug you, those you perhaps overcame (even like a little) and those fresh as yesterdays pie. It could work as some sort of healer, who knows.

 

I have several, but this might have been the most poignant –

 

It's the 1953 J-45, which it was fixed last fall. VintageGibsonJ-454-1.jpgWhooouu, but what a loose tooth is was.

And more threatened to click out. . . . .

I agree with J45nick on the 'notch'....I would have that fixed before you splinter a thumb! Other than 'the notch' ....she barely looks played! You are 'playing her' are you not? [unsure]

2760212850066230676S600x600Q85.jpg

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Don't know kidblast, but the blistering scar-surface by the fretboard could be the result of a replaced or repaired neck at from before my time.

No matter what, the nitro has suffered there.

But that fact never bothered me so much compared to the missing tooth, which was replaced as the whole zone got fortified.

 

These are the only shots I have – don't show too much.

You are 'playing her' are you not?

Yes retro, I do. The last 10 days or so been doin' Wondering Aloud with capo on 4th fret and had her goin' during a jam last Wednesday – eminent !

 

 

This is hotel room pictures Fall2011repaired1953J-45.jpg

 

 

taken after a Crosby Nash concert. Fall2011repaired1953J-452.jpg

 

 

In fact I just recieved the fixed guitar on that same trip.Fall2011repaired1953J-454.jpgSo it's a first test.

 

 

Unfortunately Dave and Graham wasn't there. Fall2011repaired1953J-453.jpg

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Don't know kidblast, but the blistering scar-surface by the fretboard could be the result of a replaced or repaired neck at from before my time.

No matter what, the nitro has suffered there.

But that fact never bothered me so much compared to the missing tooth, which was replaced as the whole zone got fortified.

 

These are the only shots I have – don't show too much.

 

Yes retro, I do. The last 10 days or so been doin' Wondering Aloud with capo on 4th fret and had her goin' during a jam last Wednesday – eminent !

 

 

This is hotel room pictures Fall2011repaired1953J-45.jpg

 

 

 

 

taken after a Crosby Nash concert. Fall2011repaired1953J-452.jpg

 

 

In fact I just recieved the fixed guitar on that same trip.Fall2011repaired1953J-454.jpgSo it's a first test.

 

 

Unfortunately Dave and Graham wasn't there. Fall2011repaired1953J-453.jpg

 

 

Now wait a minute here. What a '53 J-45 doing with a banner headstock? There's more to this story than meets the eye. And what's with the rectangular bridge on a '53? Are you messing with our heads here. showing multiple guitars?

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Now wait a minute here. What a '53 J-45 doing with a banner headstock? There's more to this story than meets the eye. And what's with the rectangular bridge on a '53? Are you messing with our heads here. showing multiple guitars?

Iiiiiii Doooon't Knoooow – it has been up before and you plus whoever expert have thrown their eyes on it without finding the clue. Board-brother JT, a Londoner from Denmark Street, a local hawk saw it (or pictures of it) and noone can tell.

I purchased the guitar precisely a year ago from today and besides the missing tooth it had the so called JLD-system installed. A device that holds down the rising belly, but also stiffens the nature of the instrument. It was immediately removed and slowly the massage to work the stiffness out that old body began.

 

My idea is that it was meant to emulate a Banner model, but way back before people got aware of the real details of those. The rectangular bridge is too big and the logo misses a top of the S. The banner itself is right on the nail. It's all Gibson though and the inside of the box has the 1953 letter. The fretboard has been sanded (maybe over several times – last one not long before I got it) and the set-up is superb for it's age.

 

A highly mysterious 45 it is – velvet voiced like nothing I ever heard, slightly boomy, yet so vintage and very real and sounding. It stands alone.

I can't imagine it as anything but a keeper – will never find anything like it again.

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Iiiiiii Doooon't Knoooow – it has been up before and you plus whoever expert have thrown their eyes on it without finding the clue. Board-brother JT, a Londoner from Denmark Street, a local hawk saw it (or pictures of it) and noone can tell.

I purchased the guitar precisely a year ago from today and besides the missing tooth it had the so called JL-system installed. A device that holds down the rising belly, but also stiffens the nature of the instrument. It was immediately removed and slowly the massage to work the stiffness out that old body began.

 

My idea is that it was meant to emulate a Banner model, but way back before people got aware of the real details of those. The rectangular bridge is too big and the logo misses a top of the S. The banner itself is right on the nail. It's all Gibson though and the inside of the box has the 1953 letter. The fretboard has been sanded (maybe over several times – last one not long before I got it) and the set-up is superb for it's age.

 

A highly mysterious 45 it is – velvet voiced like nothing I ever heard, slightly boomy, yet so vintage and very real and sounding. It stands alone.

I can't imagine it as anything but a keeper – will never find anything like it again.

 

 

I do love a good guitar mystery!

 

So you are saying it has a Y-prefix FON? That would seem to be definitive in dating the body, at least.

 

Bridges can and do get changed all the time, so that doesn't count for much. My old J-45 has had three bridges in its 60+ years of life.

 

The headstock detail is more problematic. It wasn't until recent years that the banner-era guitars became as desirable as they now are, so the possibility of a re-neck in the past with a part from an older guitar seems possible, particularly given the odd finish damage around the fretboard extension. I'd love it if you sent me or posted some headstock detail photos to look at. Have you used a black light on the guitar to try to isolate finish inconsistencies, particularly around the neck joint?

 

I'm not familiar with the JL system, but if it's anything like the floating brace top support that Gibson used in the 60's for a similar purpose, getting rid of it was a great idea.

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A side crack in my J-45 TV that was there when I bought it... honest, otherwise it would been enough to make me pee my pants, instead, it gave me an enormously discounted purchase price.

J-45Crack.jpg

Did you get that one fixed? If so, how was it done?

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Glued and cleated. Finish not attended to, since this is not "on the driver's side". I have no details of the actual method of surgery used, but it seems nice and tight, plays well, and I have no complaints. Bought it from Willies - repair work was all theirs.

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Glued and cleated. Finish not attended to, since this is not "on the driver's side". I have no details of the actual method of surgery used, but it seems nice and tight, plays well, and I have no complaints. Bought it from Willies - repair work was all theirs.

 

If you got a big fat discount then to me this seems like a preety good deal. We seem to over react when we hear 'crack' and imagine its the end of the guitar, when in reality most cracks are easily fixed by experts for a relatively minor price.

 

Hence, its good that you took your blinkers off and saw the great opportunity that was presented here .. [thumbup]

 

I'll have to maake some pics of my 69'er, boy that lady has been roughed up a bit over the years ...

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This is an effective technique and used by woodworkers but he's doing it on an unfinished top. How did you get the water to penetrate through the finish? How did the finish look after you did this? Seems to me you would have a finish repair if you did this on a finished guitar.

 

I had a few little dents that I steamed out with this method. no adverse appearance to the finish after the fact and it did improve if not remove the dents. (these were done on Taylors with a waterbased UV finish, not sure if that matters though).

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I had a few little dents that I steamed out with this method. no adverse appearance to the finish after the fact and it did improve if not remove the dents. (these were done on Taylors with a waterbased UV finish, not sure if that matters though).

 

 

Yes, that could make a significant difference! Every finish reacts differently to moisture, and some will simply cloud and lift off the surface. It would be good if someone like pfox who builds and restores guitars could comment on using this technique on a nitro finish. I'm not willing to experiment with one of my guitars.

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Not scary - just part of life and what to expect unless your only have shed guitars.

 

Where to start. Cab't even scratc the surface but here are a few.

 

1960 Harmony Sovereign

 

033.jpg

 

Anybody up for some screw holes? 1957 Epiphone FT-79

 

003-1.jpg

 

About as road worn as it gets - take a close look and you will see what it is not good to drag your pinky when playing. 1958 Tele

 

1958Tele.jpg

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Not scary - just part of life and what to expect unless your only have shed guitars.

 

Where to start. Cab't even scratc the surface but here are a few.

 

1960 Harmony Sovereign

 

033.jpg

 

Anybody up for some screw holes? 1957 Epiphone FT-79

 

003-1.jpg

 

About as road worn as it gets - take a close look and you will see what it is not good to drag your pinky when playing. 1958 Tele

 

1958Tele.jpg

 

 

the epi had a double pickguard ????

 

 

 

JC

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the epi had a double pickguard ????

 

 

 

JC

 

 

The screw holes suggest a massive single pickguard to me. I screwed a big pickguard onto the top of my $5 Mexican classical that I converted to a steel-string folk guitar back in the early 60's. It's a miracle I even considered sticking with playing guitar after starting out on such an instrument.

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about steaming, My taylor GS is the only one I tried that on.. the material for the finish probably had everything to do with it. I saw an article posted some where that suggested trying steaming for small dents in the top, it worked well enough and from there, I let it be.

 

of one of my favorite acoustics in my collection, a 1978 Alvarez Yari DY74. The spruce top has a lot of stories to tell. The rosewood back and sides are in pretty good shape considering the Guitars age. Got it used in 1989. It reeked of stale cigarette smoke and hadn't had a proper cleaning/restringing since the day it was bought. I had to replace the stock pickup and Grover tuners about 15 years ago.

 

It's always had a certain magic to it, the tone is beautiful and it plays like a dream. Never to be sold.

 

Yari2.jpg

 

Yari3.jpg

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