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LG-2 vs. B-25


DCBirdMan

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Well, the lore states that the LG-2 became the B-25, a full 50 years ago, 1962. LG-0 LG-1 LG-1 and LG-3 continued on into the 60s.

 

Were any changes made -- that is, is a say 1955 LG-2 pretty much the same guitar/ same sound as a 1965 B-25??

 

Would be interested in opinions here.

 

What the heck did LG stand for anyway

 

SG was 'solid guitar' we are told

 

LG was 'little guitar? [biggrin]

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"LG" stood for "Ladies' Guitar" according to most people I've spoken to about it.

 

The "B" in B15/B25 etc is a mystery, but they were intended originally as student instruments, so "Beginner" "Basic" or "Baby" (due to size) are all candidates.

 

A '55 LG2 will typically have a chunkier neck than a '65 B25, and a Brazilian Rosewood fixed bridge, whereas the B25 is likely to have an Adj. saddle in a Rosewood bridge or a fixed saddle in a plastic bridge.

 

I like B25s a lot, but they're better from '62-'65 rather than afterwards, as bracing got heavier and they wore the typical late '60s Gibson pencil neck from '66 onwards or thereabouts.

 

One of the best guitars I ever played was a '64 B25 in Cherry 'burst. It had the sweetest, most mournful tone I've ever heard, absolutely stunning. I returned to the shop two days later with brass in pocket, but it had gone home with someone else.

 

LG2s are great too, as are most '50s Gibsons. Very comfy neck for a big-handed player such as I, and a great tone for just about anything.

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A '55 LG2 will typically have a chunkier neck than a '65 B25, and a Brazilian Rosewood fixed bridge, whereas the B25 is likely to have an Adj. saddle in a Rosewood bridge or a fixed saddle in a plastic bridge.

 

I like B25s a lot, but they're better from '62-'65 rather than afterwards, as bracing got heavier and they wore the typical late '60s Gibson pencil neck from '66 onwards or thereabouts.

Plastic bridges first appeared on the LG-2 in late '62, and continued on the B-25 through '66. In '67 they went back to a reverse-belly rosewood bridge, and then to a standard-belly in '68. Also, note that the plastic bridge did not have a fixed saddle as mentioned above, but rather an adjustable ceramic saddle.

Re the bracing, I've owned a '64, '65, and currently a '66 (Gibson B25 or Epi Cortez). The bracing remains the same at least through '66, and it is very thin, which most likely contributes significnatly to the highly responsive nature of these guitars.

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It's like any mid-60s Gibson. 1960-62 are pretty much like the 55s, but after 62, they began to bulk up, thicker braces, laminate maple bridge pads, the plastic bridge. By 67, they had the narrow necks as well.

 

 

Timing is tricky on these, as I've seen details vary in ways that we think are inconsistent with nominal year. There must have been a lot going on at Gibson in the mid-60's.

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is a say 1955 LG-2 pretty much the same guitar/ same sound as a 1965 B-25??

The LG-2, LG-3, B25, and Epi Cortez are identical in body size and all are X-braced. All have the potential to deliver a wonderful sound, but must be examined on a case by case basis. In terms of tonal qualities, throw out the year of manufacture as a significant marker, or you might pass up a real winner.

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About two years ago I bought a 1960 LG-2 from Gary's Classic Guitars. I sent George Gruhn a note asking about the bigger frets and in the same note I asked him what the LG stood for and he said "Little Guitar".

 

Bigger frets U mention = me like.

 

How is dealing with that Gary dude? Has some cool stuff- other dealers have better prices tho.

 

Some dealerz still think it's some year before 2008 as far as vintage guitar prices... with some exceptions, seems like guitar prices took a hit like other things...

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  • 2 weeks later...

Gary was good to work with. Very good at describing the guitar etc, offered a return policy and all. If you find a certain guitar you like and look around you will find his prices a little steep but probably not an more than say Folkways or Gruhns. He has guys that make sure the guitars are in good shape, set up and all. It was good. I would buy from him again.

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I also always thought LG stood for Little Guitar. If you read some of Gibson's sales literature from the day they push the LGs as being great for students, strolling players and teachers.

 

Although the biggest difference between an LG-2 and B-25 will be the neck - other things you will run into would be laminated bridge plates, really thick pickguards and all kinds of strange bridge/saddle arrangements.

 

All in all, I would go for the pre-1960 LG-2 because if nothing else the neck profile. If I were going to pick a BG-25 I would grab a 1963-1964. As noted, while the necks were not as beefy as you got on the earlier LGs, they have more meat on them than necks made from 1960 to 1962 while the necks from 1965 on feel skinnier than they were because of the narrower nut.

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