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rjames1973

Gibson LP Studio Won't Stay in Tune - The Saga Continues

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Giver the information about the "pinging" while tuning, I'd bet this is a classic issue of strings sticking in the nut. Do a couple of things to check this:

 

[1] tune the G and B strings to pitch using a tuner

[2] play a couple of bend licks on the G ONLY, bend towards the bottom E, don't touch the B

[3] check the open tuning of the G and B again

 

If the G AND B are BOTH out of tune, the most likely possibility is that the bridge is shifting, or the entire neck is moving somehow

 

If only the G has changed tuning, then the tension on the string has changed. Assuming the string is properly stretched to begin with, there are only two possible reasons

 

[1] the tuning head has let more string unwind from the shaft. In this case, the string will go flat. A tuning head cannot, IMO spontaneously wind MORE string onto the shaft to make a note go sharp. This "slippage" is generally not a defect in the head, although it is often identifed as such. It is often caused by one of two things. the first is Insufficent string wound onto the shaft itself ,or wound on without the required one loop above the hole and all the others below ,allowing the string to slip round the tuner shaft. If your strings were changed by a luthier, this shouldn't be a problem.

 

The second is the behevior of tuning "down" to the correct pitch, instead of "up" to the correct pitch. If you are tuning and go too high in pitch, always go back down below the correct pitch and then back up. That way, the worm gear on the head is resting firmly on the gear at the bottom of the shaft.

 

[2] the most likey reason is that the string is sticking in the nut. if the nut is too narrrow, or 'V' shaped at the base of the slot, no amount of lubrication will stop it from grabbing the string. IMO a good nut slot has a nice curved bottom and is polished until it's shiny. This can be done with abrasive cord, or string soaked in a mild abrasive. A good luthier should know how to do this.

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Thanks for the information, which was very helpful. I will check all of the things that you have recommended. Ultimately, I'm going to locate a certified Gibson luthier in my area and see what that yields as well.

 

Giver the information about the "pinging" while tuning, I'd bet this is a classic issue of strings sticking in the nut. Do a couple of things to check this:

 

[1] tune the G and B strings to pitch using a tuner

[2] play a couple of bend licks on the G ONLY, bend towards the bottom E, don't touch the B

[3] check the open tuning of the G and B again

 

If the G AND B are BOTH out of tune, the most likely possibility is that the bridge is shifting, or the entire neck is moving somehow

 

If only the G has changed tuning, then the tension on the string has changed. Assuming the string is properly stretched to begin with, there are only two possible reasons

 

[1] the tuning head has let more string unwind from the shaft. In this case, the string will go flat. A tuning head cannot, IMO spontaneously wind MORE string onto the shaft to make a note go sharp. This "slippage" is generally not a defect in the head, although it is often identifed as such. It is often caused by one of two things. the first is Insufficent string wound onto the shaft itself ,or wound on without the required one loop above the hole and all the others below ,allowing the string to slip round the tuner shaft. If your strings were changed by a luthier, this shouldn't be a problem.

 

The second is the behevior of tuning "down" to the correct pitch, instead of "up" to the correct pitch. If you are tuning and go too high in pitch, always go back down below the correct pitch and then back up. That way, the worm gear on the head is resting firmly on the gear at the bottom of the shaft.

 

[2] the most likey reason is that the string is sticking in the nut. if the nut is too narrrow, or 'V' shaped at the base of the slot, no amount of lubrication will stop it from grabbing the string. IMO a good nut slot has a nice curved bottom and is polished until it's shiny. This can be done with abrasive cord, or string soaked in a mild abrasive. A good luthier should know how to do this.

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The 2012 studio has a LIFETIME warranty, but only if you use their Luthiers. I dont know about setups as you can do one yourself, so if your had GC do one, Im not sure if that would void the warranty, but

if you bought it there, I would think it would be ok. I am just guessing, though.

 

Try a trick of using some Vaseline and then putting graphite powder mixed in with it

and using a tooth pick to put a dab on the nut slice area. Just loosen up your string and move it over a bit.

 

 

I hope you get this taken care of, as I have owned my guitar for almost 5 months now, yet Ive only had it

in my possession for less then 26 days total. I should be getting it back soon, and this time I know it will

be done the correct way. Good Luck

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Here's the one solution no one has tossed out there yet.

 

 

GET ANOTHER LUTHIER.

 

Either your guy can't fix it or has no idea what do to -- same result.

 

Are you calling a pimple-faced kid who works part-time at GC who just knows a little more about guitars than you do a Luthier?

 

Again: Get another Luthier.

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Just ruminating.... our lead guitarist had a similar issue with his Les Paul Standard. The 'PINGING' was the clue here, he had the same.

After going through the same sequence workarounds as explained in the above posts it seems the culprit was a combination of high break angle over the bridge & bridge saddles that needed lubricating.

If break angle over the saddles is too steep then strings, especially wound strings, may be dragging/catching. Worth a try to adjust the stop tail height & lube the saddles, 10 min job.

 

FWIW, when stretching out new strings, make sure that you stretch the WHOLE string, not just the bit that goes between the nut & bridge.

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All,

 

Thanks very much for all of the replies. Unfortunately, I haven't had a chance to reply lately due to my busy work schedule. This weekend I'm planning to apply some Nut Sauce that I bought at a local guitar shop to see if that solves the tuning issue with the G, B, and high E strings. I'm definitely hearing a distinct "ping" noise when I have to re-tune any of those strings. Hopefully, the Nut Sauce will help.

 

BTW, to the poster who suggested I was taking my LP Studio to Guitar Center for maintenance, I would NEVER take any guitar I own to that store for any reason other than to return it. There is a local "mom and pop" guitar store in my area where I have taken all of my guitars, and the guitar techs who work there are very professional and experienced. Lots of local musicians take their instruments there for maintenance, as well as some friends who are in a local band. Just wanted to clear that up! ;)

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All,

 

So, I applied some Nut Sauce to the nut grooves of the G, B, and high E strings earlier today. I've been playing the guitar on and off since then, and all three strings are still going out of tune every single time I bend them when I attempt to play a solo. I've even tried stretching the strings out even more than they already are. I'm completely frustrated at this point, to the point where I just want to sell the guitar and be done with it. On the other hand, if anyone could recommend a good luthier in the DC area -- preferably in the Arlington or Falls Church area -- I'd be willing to give him a try as a last resort.

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All,

 

I posted on here a while back about the fact that my Gibson Les Paul Studio wouldn't stay in tune. I ordered it new from my local GC last year. The initial problem was that the G string wouldn't stay in tune after I would play guitar solos. Now, the G, B, and high E strings won't stay in tune when I play guitar solos. I had the guitar set up with my local luthier after I received the guitar. I then had him do a second "set up," after explaining to him that the guitar would not stay in tune. When I got the guitar back the second time (about two to three months ago), it did stay in tune pretty well for a while. Now, it goes out of tune whenever I play it and start bending the G, B, and high E strings. If I were to gig with this guitar, it would be a total embarrassment on stage, as I would have to stop in the middle of songs several times to retune. I'm at the point now where I might just put the guitar up for sale on Craigslist. On the other hand, I'd hate to part with it, after spending so much money on it. What else can I do to keep the guitar in tune? Should I spend more money than I already have to have a new nut installed? Should I replace the stock tuning machines? I would appreciate any help with this ongoing issue.

Hey well try wrapping the strings around the stopbar then resting them on the bridge like the old Melody makers.

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I'm definitely hearing a distinct "ping" noise when I have to re-tune any of those strings.

 

There is a local "mom and pop" guitar store in my area where I have taken all of my guitars, and the guitar techs who work there are very professional and experienced. Lots of local musicians take their instruments there for maintenance,

 

If you're getting a 'ping' when tuning the guitar then you have a string binding somewhere.

If your highly regarded 'mom-pop' shop tech can't fix a string binding issue then you should be taking it to a different tech in a different shop.

 

last.

The height of the frets make a really big difference in playing.

Take your tuner, and fret say the A on the G string (3rd string, 2 fret)

Just lightly press on the string to make the A and look what the tuner says.

Now press really hard on the string and mash it down to the fret board, now play that A and look at the tuner, I'll bet a pitcher of beer your A is going to be really sharp in tune.

 

Answer, don't mash your fingers to the fret board or have your frets lowered.

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I can't believe this thread is still going on. Bring the guitar to a competent luthier and have him check it out. More than likely it's the nut that the string is binding on. If a good luthier can;t fix it than sell it and get one that works for you.

This is not rocket science.

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CowboyBillyBob1,

 

Yes, I agree, although I appreciate everyone's feedback. I'm taking the guitar to a new guy this week. If that doesn't work out, then the LP Studio is history. Over and out!

 

I can't believe this thread is still going on. Bring the guitar to a competent luthier and have him check it out. More than likely it's the nut that the string is binding on. If a good luthier can;t fix it than sell it and get one that works for you.

This is not rocket science.

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I HAVE THE SOLUTION...LOOK NO FURTHER.I have played a couple of newer pauls(2000's) lately and they did exactly the same thing.The G string mostly just would not stay in tune.The tuners on newer studio's are absolute crap(look the same as the ones on standards but are way less quality) and won't keep your guitar in tune.It's kinda sad that you spend a grand on a guitar and it won't even stay in tune.That's one of the reasons I won't buy a new paul,but that's another thread.Go get a set of some nice grovers(my favorite) or schaller tuners and put them on that bad boy.Then take a pencil and leave a little graphite in the grooves of your nut before you put your strings on everytime.This will keep the nut smooth and the strings won't hangup on it when you do a bend.Doing these two things should totally solve your problem,it did for me.If it doesn't then you need to send it back to gibson.New tuners are about $60 and totally worth the money.See if gibson will pay for them,they should have put them on in the first place.Good Luck-there's nothting worse than a guitar that won't stay in tune

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All,

 

I posted on here a while back about the fact that my Gibson Les Paul Studio wouldn't stay in tune. I ordered it new from my local GC last year. The initial problem was that the G string wouldn't stay in tune after I would play guitar solos. Now, the G, B, and high E strings won't stay in tune when I play guitar solos. I had the guitar set up with my local luthier after I received the guitar. I then had him do a second "set up," after explaining to him that the guitar would not stay in tune. When I got the guitar back the second time (about two to three months ago), it did stay in tune pretty well for a while. Now, it goes out of tune whenever I play it and start bending the G, B, and high E strings. If I were to gig with this guitar, it would be a total embarrassment on stage, as I would have to stop in the middle of songs several times to retune. I'm at the point now where I might just put the guitar up for sale on Craigslist. On the other hand, I'd hate to part with it, after spending so much money on it. What else can I do to keep the guitar in tune? Should I spend more money than I already have to have a new nut installed? Should I replace the stock tuning machines? I would appreciate any help with this ongoing issue.

 

You are not alone Studio owner! My 2011 studio has tuning instability too, with the Kluson tulip type tuners. Drives ya mad shelling out for quality to have to tune it after every bend. Seems to really go wild when it's hot, flat in hot climate, sharp in cold (or the other way around i can't remember). But that's because the wood expands and contracts. It should be stable at room temp. I'm torn on what to do, some say you need the string to move more freely on the nut so it doesn't grab. Nutsauce lube will help. I don't want to replace the tuners. I think that the nut is cut right and that it may need actual wear and tear, like the strings actually running along the nut slots to get it settled. That's just a theory. I have suggested a leather shoe lace, weaving it through the strings above the nut and tied tight. That would give the strings less movement after it's tuned right, more grab, less slip. I don't want to say it does the same thing as a string tree on a Fender. I just don't know. I'm hoping the tuning will settle in with age and wear. Time will tell.

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Hey well try wrapping the strings around the stopbar then resting them on the bridge like the old Melody makers.

 

Hey, I topwrapped a studio and liked it!

I'm wondering whether winding the tuners up and down while the string is in tune will get the nut slot comfortable?

(just don't break the string!) seems like a lot of twisting, but use a string winder.

If I lived in an ideal world i'd get a luthier to install a bone nut and everything would be wonderful. but ...

so the studios are having tuning instability at the nut when they're new. they're all new at some point ... play the *** off of the thing, use it, abuse it, play it hard! get some wear on that new nut. the breakin period is troublesome somewhat. the new guitar goes out of tune when i play it ... ??? how do i fix it???

i wonder: Do older model Studios go out of tune as often?

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Hey, I topwrapped a studio and liked it!

I'm wondering whether winding the tuners up and down while the string is in tune will get the nut slot comfortable?

(just don't break the string!) seems like a lot of twisting, but use a string winder.

If I lived in an ideal world i'd get a luthier to install a bone nut and everything would be wonderful. but ...

so the studios are having tuning instability at the nut when they're new. they're all new at some point ... play the *** off of the thing, use it, abuse it, play it hard! get some wear on that new nut. the breakin period is troublesome somewhat. the new guitar goes out of tune when i play it ... ??? how do i fix it???

i wonder: Do older model Studios go out of tune as often?

I have a 1993 Studio that I pound the piss out of and she holds her tuning solidly......

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G-strings were problem on all my LPs. They were sticking at the nut. On 2011 Classic Custom and on the 1978 Recording and the 2010 Tribute... Interesting, isn't it? They all needed some filing. Cheers... Bence

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I had a similar problem a few years ago with a '60s SG after fitting new hardware and the problem in that instance turned out to be very simple.

 

The tailpiece through-holes were too tight and the "G" was initially catching just short of the stopper and slowly slipping as I bent it, putting it out, occasionally with the same little "ping" you mentioned.

 

I ran a small drill through all the holes and had no more problems...

 

Hope this helps

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i know this is an old thread, but the OP takes his guitar to the luthier to change his strings? How do you play a LP and not know how to change strings. Secondly, the strings are probably not broken in. When i change strings i stretch the **** out of the strings until they stop going out of tune when i stretch them.

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I own many Gibson Les Pauls & SG's and none of them hold tuning well. The first thing I do is replace the stock tuners with Grover 18:1 locking tuners, which helps a lot! Also, fresh strings before each gig do wonders, and of course make sure your guitar is set up properly. ALL guitars go out of tune to some degree if you do a lot of string bending - so invest in a good stage tuner!

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I own many Gibson Les Pauls & SG's and none of them hold tuning well. The first thing I do is replace the stock tuners with Grover 18:1 locking tuners, which helps a lot! Also, fresh strings before each gig do wonders, and of course make sure your guitar is set up properly. ALL guitars go out of tune to some degree if you do a lot of string bending - so invest in a good stage tuner!

 

Have to disagree! Once an LP is set up properly - it will stay in tune forever. I bend a lot, and have a brutal vibrato. The nut needs filing on all of them out-of-the-box, then You can forget about the tuning issues.

 

Cheers... Bence

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Right, it´s not the tuners, but almost always too tight slot in the nut, g + h strings.

Play a lot, bend a lot, use pencil lead/graphite or some lube,and it will go away - all my LPs had been like this unless bought used and "seasoned"...

I never even needed to file the slot. Just lube the nut and play the thing [thumbup]

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Well you could boil your strings for 20 minutes like Eddie Van Halen before stringing your guitar up. Don't know if it works but he claims it does.

 

First of all, let me thank you for knowing why he did that. Way too many times I've been asked if I did that to clean them.

 

From about 1982 to 2003 I boiled every set of Ernies I put on every electric guitar of mine before I took it out of the house. If I strung it on Friday and played also on Saturday I'd keep them strings on and use that guitar for next couple rehearsals. Some guitars didn't go out as much so didn't get boiled and strung up as often, my main guitars over twenty years, in two countries and three states, all got boiled strings every time they went out.

 

I wasn't much of a trem bar user, I started boiling back when I had a couple trem'd washburns and an Electra Phoenix I remember, but oddly enough never used my stracaster trems. Still boiled strings for all of them, Mrs has a couple pictures of me over the stove with a boxa Ernies on one side and a pot on the other, Mrlbl in the face and a Heineken in my back pocket. Good times.

 

Then, I retired from gigs and stopped boiling them because if I'm not in tune nobody but the cats will know.

 

We boiled them to stretch them all the way, then when they cooled they shrunkdeded all the way down to shrunked, and couldn't stretch anymore. Only lasted a gig or two, would get really rough and begin oxidizing fast, but stayed in tune. Were fabulous for the first two sets, soft and slinky.

 

I think I wasn't the only guy doing that, there were others, Eddie made it famous, but not, as many still think, for cleaning them.

 

Thanks for reminding me CrazyTrain.

 

rct

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