Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Attention New Acoustic


E-minor7

Recommended Posts

Hahaha

 

jasus.. So much spite for someone none of you know..haha..he certainly causes a reaction

 

I dont know Bono... but I wish him all the best.. not really into u2 but saw them in Leeds years ago and the show was feckin spectacular ( the one where they all came out of the Lemon )

 

Dylan writes about him comming over to his house and bringing a crate of Guiness which they both proceeded to drink into the small hours and Bono heard some songs Bob had "laying around in a draw"

he said he should use a producer U2 had worked with on Joshua Tree and then calls up Daniel Lanois..... he produced Oh Mercy and the album which heralded Bob's amazing return to form Time out of Mind

 

I'd have a pint with him... I bet he has plenty to talk about

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lWdG8NoFXY0

 

Oh and i think the Black Dove is cool man

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Stein, I'm not saying he hasn't done ANY good. However, he/his charitable foundation ONE has been found to be VERY hypocritical in the past. I recall an article in the Times or Telegraph that showed the tax returns of ONE. They received something like $15m in donations and less than $200,000 of that made it to good causes. Almost $10m spent on executive and employee salaries!! In saying that, I'm sure he has given much more to charity than I have! I know that's an isolated example too. The press are all too quick to jump on a negative story while many positive stories are not reported.

 

Sorry folks

 

but listen... I decided to have a quick look into this claim on Google.. as I was suspicious of not getting the full story

 

here is a link to a short article by the Daily Mail ... another right wing British rag of a news paper

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1314543/Bonos-ONE-foundation-giving-tiny-percentage-funds-charity.html

 

EVEN THEY have to give some of the facts... I quote from the article

 

"ONE said it took no money from the public and that most of its funding came from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation." ( but hey thats another story ...!!!! )

 

Most of the money is spent on raising awareness, which is the whole perpose of the One Foundation

 

Honestly man.... this is exactly why I find it incredible that people rant and spew forth spiteful opinions about people they read about in the feckin MEDIA

 

If you are still listening to what these Corporate Whore of media companies are telling you..and BELEIVING IT.... then I feel for you

 

WAKE UP!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't really care for black guitars, not even sunbursts turning to black.

 

As for Bono, living in a vacuum I guess, since I've never listened to his music. Seen him on TV doing a charity drive or two, but can't recall if he sang anything.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't really care for black guitars, not even sunbursts turning to black.

 

As for Bono, living in a vacuum I guess, since I've never listened to his music. Seen him on TV doing a charity drive or two, but can't recall if he sang anything.

 

Wow

 

what an inspiring post... makes me have faith in the human race again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Del, I believe I quoted from the Telegraph or The Times. Not that it matters much but I'll look for the article. I certainly don't believe everything 'the media' tells me. I didn't say they used public money either.

 

Corporate Media Whores? Bono is as corporate as it gets (albeit minus the suit haha). I've nothing against the guy. He just isn't my cup of tea. I'm prob not his either and neither of the two of us would lose sleep over that I'm sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The look on his face seems to say, I dont hear anything..?

 

I like Bono..

I cruised through his book years ago for a while...I think it was an autobiography..I really liked what I read, worth reading.

I think he is a good person.

I dont like the preaching thing either but I never found him over doing it..but I havent kept up either.

Jackson Browne on the other hand I F#@*k*& can't stand.

That dude is like a broken record..he shoves it into every song..cover..interview..video..he needs to get some vitamins into his system...nearly 30 years he's at it.

His old songs with that Lindley guy playing were really great but then he became a constant hassle shoving that down his listeners throats.

 

Concerning Bono's voice..he was a power dude & he's getting old.

 

Oh yeah..another interesting book to read is one called "What would Kieth do..?" or something like that. About Kieth Richards..really entertaining character that guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's all been said...

 

U2 have sustained a mega career for a long time now...and can fill stadia at will

 

They would not have succeeded without the flamboyant Bono (funny I always think of Bonio dog biscuits [biggrin])

 

I've never heard any pontifications, so perhaps that is just as well :blink:

 

Edge's use of tone, delay and space is unique and charismatic IMO

 

So in the final analysis, I am glad U2 are around

 

And good luck to them [thumbup]

 

V

 

:-({|=

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If this world needs a 4 topped mountain-chain of a rock band, I'm glad it's called U2. I think the mass audiences – of which I've been apart now and again – chose well. And that the guys lift the task like kings*.

 

U2 in 1982 – my first concert with them. A young band with tremendous power. They knew what they wanted and no tank could stop them.

 

U2 in 1992 – the second. Too biiiig for my taste, a stadium. Couldn't take Bono phoning civil-war suffering Sarajevo and singing Let It Be with one hand while playing Mephisto with the other. Had to walk out before it stopped.

 

U2 in the early 00's – the third. An indoor summer concert. The hall so hot that everyone was dripping wet from out to in before the show started. Thought the hours ahead would kill me. Then a wall of lights went on and the band took over. The Edge with wool-hat.

 

Have to say it was fantastic – still can't believe how we all made it (well a few fainted and was carried out). The beginning of Where The Streets Have No Name and the rest of that song was out of this world – definitely on my top-10 rock'n'roll moments list.

Such situations are never forgotten -

 

 

 

*but isn't it about time they develop some acoustic skills on those 200's. ..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

*but isn't it about time they develop some acoustic skills on those 200's. ..

I dig some 80's music, of course I do. But there wasn't much acoustic guitar before girls like Suzanne Vega and Tracey Chapman came along. Then happened the unplugged theme and even basses went acoustic – a promising sign for the 90's, which I liked much better than the decade before (mind you I'm a 1963 to 1974 fool). But have to say that the 90's acts didn't take the instrument as serious as the 60's and 70's people. I heard a lot of plain strumming like they were just out of year 1 of some learning-program. The Oasis bros. would be an example. Plenty of fine tunes and even finer guitars, but real depth or sign of interest for the wonders of acoustic strings was missing - and too often no sense of spirituality was found. Can anyone tell why, , , guess it could have to do with the speed of modernity – no time to sit down and dive into the mystic and riddles of the wooden guitar. And maybe a feeling it was all done so well before. . . .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IBut have to say that the 90's acts didn't take the instrument as serious as the 60's and 70's people. I heard a lot of plain strumming like they were just out of year 1 of some learning-program. The Oasis bros. would be an example.

 

This is where I would have to disagree with you strongly Em7. If we talk early 90's Brit pop then I agree there wasnt much complexity in their guitar work, although Noel Gallagher had a great knack in making great, simple songs and melodies ... or is he just coping the Beatles ?

 

But, I think the much dismissed Grunge bands had amazing complexity in their playing, both electric and acoustic. To me early 90's was the best 'guitar' period since the 70's. Mother Love Bone, Pearl Jam, Smashing Pumpkins, Soundgarden, STP, Alice in Chains had a lot of complexity and depth in their tunes and guitar playing. Teh Alice in Chains unplugged CD is one of my all time faves, and Jerry Cantrell weavs some serious magic on that old Guild of his.

 

Then there is Radiohead, wht to me are masters of complexity, richness and unexpected turns & twists.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Then there is Radiohead, wht to me are masters of complexity, richness and unexpected turns & twists.

 

 

 

You should listen to a perfect circle. those guys play complex music with different tempo's etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is where I would have to disagree with you strongly Em7.

Glad to hear you speak up EA – Please notice I'm talking about the acoustic approach. And let me underline that there is so much stuff I haven't heard.

Not trying to be the old fart here, but I remember missing a deeper or more complex acoustic touch from a lot of acts up through the years. It isn't something I made up yesterday, it's simply an overall retrospective impression. Now overall impressions have an inbuilt danger of not getting' the details and corners, and f.x. Alice in Chains unplugged passed me by as it happened. Would be glad to see you post a few videos with extraordinary or 'interesting'/exiting acoustic performances. What I'd like the most is of course to get my opinion changed. . .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The way I remember it, the terms "alternative" and "grunge" were really decribing bands and a sound that was just every-day rock and roll.

 

It kinda cracked me up that these labels seemed to be nessesary to make them accepted. As if calling it rock and roll wouldn't work. But sounded just like it to me.

 

Whenever I was asked about it, I would respond "alternative to what?" I mean, was it really as if offering up an "option" I didn't have?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Glad to hear you speak up EA – Please notice I'm talking about the acoustic approach. And let me underline that there is so much stuff I haven't heard.

Not trying to be the old fart here, but I remember missing a deeper or more complex acoustic touch from a lot of acts up through the years. It isn't something I made up yesterday, it's simply an overall retrospective impression. Now overall impressions have an inbuilt danger of not getting' the details and corners, and f.x. Alice in Chains unplugged passed me by as it happened. Would be glad to see you post a few videos with extraordinary or 'interesting'/exiting acoustic performances. What I'd like the most is of course to get my opinion changed. . .

 

I think most of the complexity really is in their electric work, if we talk about the grung bands, but, lets put it this way, when i heard this CD this is the time when i picked up the guitar for first time in mid 90's. And it wasnt an electric, but an acoustic, so it had a profound impact on me how, these dropped D bands can turn out such beautiful music with such power but also soft beauty. Are the acoustic performances complex, not really, but does it move me .... oh yeah.

 

There have been many nights last winter when i put the projector on in the man cave, lit up and played along to these tracks ..

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MJIOvypOWnA

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 90's (in the UK particular) were more about normal kids reclaiming music from the arty music-student types and the mincing about that went on in the 80's, it was quite industrial, quite indie in terms of low budgets etc... ironically there was just as much aesthetic posturing as their had been in the 80's but a bit more 'street level' stars wearing clothes, shoes, guitars you could actually afford.

 

Oasis in particular probably made an awful lot of working class kids take up music, when I was at school music was for the 'gay kids', it wasn't something cool at all, the Stone roses, Happy Mondays, Inspiral Carpets, The La's and on and on changed all that, council estate kids making music again, almost like a reinvention of the punk scene but without scabby gear and schoolyard politics. A few years later after the club scene and the E generation had had their fill of 240BPM's and low pass bass filters the like sof the Gallagher brothers inspired a nation of epiphone owners and 'Mowgli haircut' wearing kids to once again fuse their baggy dance leanings with a bit of Beatles and Kinks appreciation.

 

In that whole scene though, it was the big shift to the modern world, the idea that you didn;t need to mimic duran duran videos to get on MTV, the songs were a part of it, for a brief time it felt like something magic was going to happen before it panned out to mediocrity (much like the 60's did to be honest), to the kids of that day the Noel's and Liam's of the world were more relevant than the Elvis', the Dylan's, the Guthrie's etc etc... only when they got a bit older they started looking back.

 

As for technical proficiency, to a certain extend it had all been done, western music does have a finite amount of variance that the ears will take to. They sold as much with their attitudes, their trainers and they're nonchalance and rock n roll as they did with their pentatonic scales... the same could be said for Elvis, the Stones etc... every generation has one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

90's "grunge" is really just 70's music combined with 60's style of dress.

 

A real Hippie is true grunge.

 

Hippies didn't have electricity, therefore, "unplugged" before we called it "unplugged".

 

I haven't dropped out, but I have been known to check out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

90's "grunge" is really just 70's music combined with 60's style of dress.

 

A real Hippie is true grunge.

 

Hippies didn't have electricity, therefore, "unplugged" before we called it "unplugged".

 

I haven't dropped out, but I have been known to check out.

Think I see what you mean, but wasn't there a blacker than black punk-like mentality to the mix also. I felt it that way and though some of the bands were good, it made me pass.

I can see why youngsters would need to express frustration about realities around them (and the heavy weights of existence as a whole), but to invite the Grim Reaper as a sidekick - and party from there - is an overreaction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think most of the complexity really is in their electric work, , , ,

Liked those Alice tunes – the band carry a flame, no doubt. Down in A Hole being my fav.

Though not especially seducing, fine acoustic details are heard in both.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...