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What happened to this headstock?


Monggee

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I agree with BK on this--something has been sprayed on or near this guitar that has damaged the finish. The decal got the worst of it--and the decal would be the most sensitive spot to any finish killing spray. Bug spray?

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It really depends more on the condition of the rest of the guitar. Do you have any photos?

 

These are the best I have. It's a '49 LG-2. I'm told that it is all original (except for tuning buttons), structurally sound, and plays and sounds great but wont get to try it out till this weekend. I'd love to have a # in mind when I go.

 

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This is a tough call. The guitar shows a lot of playwear, as well as the headstock damage. I would only consider it if it has a really nice voice, or if you can get it really cheap. In excellent shape, it might go for around $2k. As-is, I would certainly be reluctant to go over $1K, if it is structurally sound, and I might even walk at that.

 

In the case of a vintage guitar in less-than-excellent condition, you really have to compare it ot what you can get in a modern Gibson--such as an L-OO in this case--for similar money.

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This is a tough call. The guitar shows a lot of playwear, as well as the headstock damage. I would only consider it if it has a really nice voice, or if you can get it really cheap. In excellent shape, it might go for around $2k. As-is, I would certainly be reluctant to go over $1K, if it is structurally sound, and I might even walk at that.

 

In the case of a vintage guitar in less-than-excellent condition, you really have to compare it ot what you can get in a modern Gibson--such as an L-OO in this case--for similar money.

 

That number is a lot lower than I was thinking... couldn't I just get the headstock refinished for $150 or so? Would losing the original logo be that a big deal?

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That number is a lot lower than I was thinking... couldn't I just get the headstock refinished for $150 or so? Would losing the original logo be that a big deal?

 

It's not just the loss of the logo that hurts the value, although that probably knocks a few hundred off value. The general condition just looks well-worn, and I would guess it may have some other issues that go with the degree of wear it shows. Given the amount of top and neck wear, I would be a bit surprised not to see other issues such as fret wear, board divots, and maybe braces that need attention.

 

People pay a premium for these in really good condition, but condition really drives value. Remember that the LG-2 was sort of a lower-mid-level flat-top guitar, just one step above the ladder-braced entry level small-body LG-1 at that time.

 

A lot will depend on its playability and tone, and you have to be able to see beyond things such as dead strings, poor set-up, etc., that you are likely to encounter in estate sales.

 

Some of these are funky, interesting-sounding guitars, especially for finger-picking and country-style blues. Some less so.

 

The condition suggests a bit of owner abuse over the years, but you won't really know until you look at it in person.

 

The picture looks like it still has a lot of saddle, which is a good thing, as you can knock $500 off if it needs a neck re-set.

 

In general with vintage guitars, you have to be willing to walk away if the value isn't there, and you really won't know until you lay your hands on it. As a walk-in cash customer, you are saving the seller a lot of trouble and money if you buy it, so you need to take that into account in making an offer. They won't need to auction it, pack it, etc, all of which eats into what they ultimately get for the guitar. Cash in hand talks.

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And it's hard to tell from the picture but there may be a crack in the top. However it's located dead center, which means it is probably where the two pieces of the top are joined ..... that seam often shows up on old guitars. If it is cracked, that and the played out condition and the headstock pretty much kills the value. Be sure to check to determine that it doesn't need a fret job or neck reset. Lots to be concerned about here .... If the tone is wonderful (and that's going to be hard to say with one sitting in a strange enviornment) a low price might sway you toward taking a chance.

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