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thoughts on dylans new album?


blindboygrunt

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only had it in the car for a day but am liking it so far .

pay in blood and scarlet town are doing it for me, the lyrics are fantastic , i like when bobby spits anger in his words and there are plenty of examples .

roll on john about lennon i found very touching ,

only let down is the titanic song which i was looking forward to a lot , but it might grow on me

 

its been given top marks in a lot of magazines , but its the old guys 40th and i think theres a lot of PR going on there, because i dont think its as instantly and obviously as brilliant as time out of mind or love and theft , but , hey , what do i know ? it'll go round in the machine a few more times for sure

 

what you all think ?

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OK, so it'll be a while before a copy pitches up in Southern Hungary, and I've not got itunes, which means I'm stuck with what they've released on youtube or through the Guardian. I can't get the opening lap guitar riff from Duquesne Whistle out of my head, so that appears to be a winner. Keep going back to that track. Early Roman Kings is just fine, but the so-called Muddy Waters groove doesn't quite hit me like, well, Muddy Waters. Doesn't matter, since Dylan has never really sought to sound Chicago even back in the Highway 61 days when he had Mike Bloomfield on guitar. But it's more musically more generic, I think. The lyrics are enticing, but with BD, it's always the ones with a good tune that pull me back, because you're going to get good words anyway. Will try to procure a copy, because the released tracks are selling it to me, but I've a lot of catching up to do in my Dylan collection. Not really been disappointed by anything of his I've managed to get round to listening to, but I'm now starting to check out some of the 1970s stuff outside of Blood on the Tracks (again whatever I can get through the net before it gets taken down). We really don't have a good record shop here, and trips to Budapest are very rare, short and filled with kids' programmes, so I have to make do with what I can get. No MP3 either, and not really keen on downloading just to listen back through the computer. Anyway, certainly Dylan's recent roll seems to be continuing, all power to him. His band really swings and rocks according to need. Feels like his legacy will ultimately be so much richer than that of his greatest contemporaries (soz Sir Macca).

 

PS. Really troubled by the video to Duquesne Whistle. It's very good, but really leaves a bad feeling. I haven't checked, but was wondering if it's by the same director as that one for Must be Santa Claus where there's a scrap and the guy jumps out of the window. Both have this weird, violent plot, and Dylan partying or walking round as a subplot. So the Chrissy one is funny and the new one is really disconcerting. But is Dylan trying to cast himself as an indifferent observer of violence? The text of Duquesne Whistle doesn't quite fit that stance, does it?

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Listened to 6 tracks today and then fell asleep. Most of them stood still. They move back and forth in a pattern of about 2 lines and continue without any breaks or dynamics.

Okay, breaks and dynamics were never a big thing for Dylan, but earlier on he held other cards. Better melodies/verses were the most important.

Sorry, , , might need to give it all second chance.

 

Long and Wasted Years had something.

 

. . . . . . . . . . .

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I swear there are times when I think Dylan peaked in about 1964. Other times, he just keeps on surprising me with good stuff. Maybe I'm just too much of an old fart, but the early Dylan still can make my hair stand on end. Can't get enough of songs like "Mr. Tambourine Man" and other things from that era. We old guys live in the past a lot in any case.

 

With luck I'll die in my rocking chair at 95 with my J-45 in hand, having just played "Don't Think Twice" for the 10,000th time, the geezer in the wheelchair next to me having been a Donovan fan who hated Dylan and whacked me over the head with his cane.... Just about the time I finally played it through without missing a note, too.

 

Watched the Duquesne Whistle video, and found it just a bit too strange and unsettling. I'm not into gratuitous violence, even of the slapstick variety. I've seen enough of the real stuff to last me a lifetime.

 

Then, of course, Dylan has never exactly been your average singer/songwriter.......

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Most of them stood still. They move back and forth in a pattern of about 2 lines and continue without any breaks or dynamics

 

I agree completely. I am not expecting Dylan to be where he was at in his 20's,30's, 40's and even 50's, but releasing stuff that sounds like the mental derelict's that serenade me off-Strip when I am stopped at a traffic light. Yikes,

 

As a longtime Dylan fan I would add "Bob, Bob, Bob, why ruin your legacy with this crap, you have had a great run, let people remember you as a quality artist and not as a nodding off old man that wakes up in front of studio microphone mumbling out such dribble"? I really blame those engineers that pushed the 'record' button. They should know better.

 

Now do you want to know what I really think? LOL

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Part of that 'disturbing' atmosphere must also be due to his worn out vocal chords too. They have done more than honorable service over the years but when you start to make Tom Waits sound like a honey-tone crooner by comparison its time to hang up the voice box! Like a lot of music 'legends' though who is going to be the one to say "Do you really think this is good enough Bob? I'm guessing: no-one! [-(

 

Like many here I am a long time admirer of his work and of course Bob has earned the right to put out what he darn well pleases. To be honest though I cannot really say I have truly enjoyed much of the last decade of albums outside of the single 'Ain't Talkin' from 'Modern Times'.

 

Still, lots to enjoy from his vast body of work.

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I can live with his barbed wire voice, but find it hard to cope with the tone wise minimalist songwriting.

The Dylan I admire always the extra thing to his songs and recordings. Even the very sparse ones had an ace in the backhand.

My mother once said : Stop Bob ! in front of the TV where the new video to Political World was rolling (I think).

I wouldn't want him to to -

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With luck I'll die in my rocking chair at 95 with my J-45 in hand, having just played "Don't Think Twice" for the 10,000th time, the geezer in the wheelchair next to me having been a Donovan fan who hated Dylan and whacked me over the head with his cane....

 

William-the-Zimmer hit poor Nick J four five

With a cane that he twirled round his diamond ring finger

At a Florida gated retirement gath'rin'

And the docs were called in and his weapon took from him

As they drugged him with morphine and got him sedated

And booked William-the-Zimmer for first-degree murder

But you who philosophize disgrace and criticize Bob's later years

Take the rag away from your face

Now ain't the time for your tears

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William-the-Zimmer hit poor Nick J four five

With a cane that he twirled round his diamond ring finger

At a Florida gated retirement gath'rin'

And the docs were called in and his weapon took from him

As they drugged him with morphine and got him sedated

And booked William-the-Zimmer for first-degree murder

But you who philosophize disgrace and criticize Bob's later years

Take the rag away from your face

Now ain't the time for your tears

 

 

I was only a pawn in their game.........

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I swear there are times when I think Dylan peaked in about 1964. Other times, he just keeps on surprising me with good stuff. Maybe I'm just too much of an old fart, but the early Dylan still can make my hair stand on end. Can't get enough of songs like "Mr. Tambourine Man" and other things from that era. We old guys live in the past a lot in any case.

 

Amen! I did Mr Tambourine Man at an open mic a couple weeks ago. I think there were only a handful of people in the place who had ever heard it before!

 

I do think Blood on the Tracks was a great album but even that's 30+ years old. Haven't heard the new one yet.

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Amen! I did Mr Tambourine Man at an open mic a couple weeks ago. I think there were only a handful of people in the place who had ever heard it before!

What, , , !? Where were you playing – a deaf-center. . . . I believe Dylans essential songs should be seen/heard as Picassos. They are timeless and will speak to people who think a bit about existence no matter year of birth.

 

And I'm also talking 'bout the actual recordings here.

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What, , , !? Where were you playing – a deaf-center. . . . I believe Dylans essential songs should be seen/heard as Picassos. They are timeless and will speak to people who think a bit about existence no matter year of birth.

 

And I'm also talking 'bout the actual recordings here.

 

 

Em7, you are showing your age again. There are young people today that know little or nothing about Dylan, or just see him as a doddering antique. And, of course, they've never heard the Byrds' covers of some of those songs, which are important in their own right, being made before either they or Dylan really took off.

 

Still remember the first time I heard a Dylan record at a party in the fall of 1964. I was still in my PP&M mode, part of the inevitable folk trio with the blonde girl singer. My first thought when I heard Dylan's voice was "WTF"? My second thought when I listened to the lyrics was "Wow"!

 

For the life of me, I can't remember what that first song was, but it doesn't really matter. I was hooked, and PP&M sort of vanished in the rear-view mirror.

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Em7, you are showing your age again. There are young people today that know little or nothing about Dylan, or just see him as a doddering antique. And, of course, they've never heard the Byrds' covers of some of those songs, which are important in their own right, being made before either they or Dylan really took off.

 

Still remember the first time I heard a Dylan record at a party in the fall of 1964. I was still in my PP&M mode, part of the inevitable folk trio with the blonde girl singer. My first thought when I heard Dylan's voice was "WTF"? My second thought when I listened to the lyrics was "Wow"!

 

For the life of me, I can't remember what that first song was, but it doesn't really matter. I was hooked, and PP&M sort of vanished in the rear-view mirror.

It was probably The Times They Are a Changing, , , what do I know.

I do know that not all people are familiar with Bob Dylan, no matter their age. But the same could be said about Billie Holiday, Picasso, Bergman or Phantom Blot (do you know Phantom Blot). I'm talking about young boys and girls who wanna be aware.

Regarding age, I'm a bit out of or behind my standard calendar. The price of being an early starter that is. . .

A large decade younger than you, I think.

Doesn't matter.

 

 

 

"Carry all ages."

 

.. . . . . . . . . . . E-minor7

 

 

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It was probably The Times They Are a Changing, , , what do I know.

I do know that not all people are familiar with Bob Dylan, no matter their age. But the same could be said about Billie Holiday, Picasso, Bergman or Phantom Blot (do you know Phantom Blot). I'm talking about young boys and girls who wanna be aware.

 

 

 

Phantom Blot? Now,you really are reaching back in time. Not having been a big Disney fan as a kid, that one stretched my memory. As for the others? Yes, of course.

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Can't give an informed opinion yet as I've only heard two songs- been a bit too busy. Probably says a bit about how I've viewed the "resurgence" albums since Time out of Mind....I've found a lot to like but don't return to them as much as other stuff these days.

I do really like Tell Tale Signs...but that was one of the bootleg series- with outtakes and such from all over the place from mid eighties on I think.

I do tend to prefer less production than more..so that colours my enjoyment of some of the songs.

I can handle the voice...but boy it can get rough live.

Last concert I saw he started singing and it was "Cigarrrrrrrrrr, Cigarrrrrrrr"...i thought whats he croaking about a cigar for?..it was Senor, tales of yankee power..haha.

He is still writing killer lyrics but those elusive melodies that can sound good even as elevator music are getting a bit harder to find.

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Remember seeing that black ghost for the first time – Close to you hearing your first Bob. It was in my granny's palour and I simply found the character unfathomable cool.

 

Here's a postcard I made in 2008 - Courted.jpg Censored version.

 

 

Nothing phantom about those blots.........!

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In fact I think I see a connection between Phantom Blot and Bob Dylan. He has done his share of spooking between the lines on unpredictable pages, often in black disguises, over the years.

As said I'm goin' to listen more to the Tempest album. Anyway I'll run into it here and there where I go.

 

Good reviews are never a negative thing – but don't let another mans ears tell you what you hear. Trust yourself and your own reaction/reflection. It's all about the relationship between you and 'your' artist. Like a girlfriend – would anyone want a third party to review her ways and charms. No and big NO.

 

Btw. Let's not forget how many great records, which later got status as classics, received negative reviews in the first place.

Reviewers – Who are these people, , , what do they think they are !?

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.

Whodda thought -

 

He gets good reviews . . .

 

But the codgers around here kick the geezer until he's spitting blood.

 

It's a Narrow Way . . .

 

Armed to the hilt, and struggling hard -

 

You won’t get out of here unscarred.

 

 

.

 

I don't see anyone kicking him at all. On the contrary, I see a lot of his fans saying "Hey, we love him but this is not his best work."

 

- Which, frankly, is true. Can you, hand on your heart, say that this a significantly great album that can stand comparison with his best work?

 

If not then you are in agreement with the very same people you are saying are 'kicking' him.

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