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ol fred

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I could never be mistaken for an expert...but sure seems redundant, don't it?

 

Ya think it's legit? (the F-holes look 'home made' to me).

 

Certainly appears to be legit. Would love to own it just because of the age and the fact that it's so unusual.

 

http://www.tfoa.eu/the_store/index.php?target=products&product_id=34176

 

I realize that it's not to be when it says "call for pricing"

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Nick, what's the difference between the 20, 22 & 24?

 

 

I have no first-hand experience with these. I'm just repeating the info in "Fabulous Flat-Tops". The HG-24 was apparently the first Gibson to use the new "jumbo" size and shape that we all love, and it had Brazilian back and sides. The HG-22 and HG-20 were slightly smaller, but with a shape that is somewhat similar to the jumbo, according to the photos.

 

The HG-22 and HG-20 had maple back and sides, the HG-22 with a sunburst top, and the HG-20 with an overall solid dark brown finish.

 

According to "...Flat-Tops", even after conversion for Spanish-style rather than Hawaiian-style playing, the tone produced by the guitars never became popular.

 

The unique construction features like the double rim apparently produce more of a Dobro-like sound. Apparently, the construction had to be quite rugged to take the extra tension of Hawaiian tuning, which is higher (therefore more string tension) than standard Spanish tuning.

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I have no first-hand experience with these. I'm just repeating the info in "Fabulous Flat-Tops". The HG-24 was apparently the first Gibson to use the new "jumbo" size and shape that we all love, and it had Brazilian back and sides.

 

 

Interestingly, the grain of that Brazilian back is very similar to that of a little 1870's Martin New Yorker I owned back in the early 1970's. It had developed a bunch of splits slong the convolted grain, which required careful and tedious splicing in numerous places. I didn't appreciate just how difficult that job was for many years.

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I have no first-hand experience with these. I'm just repeating the info in "Fabulous Flat-Tops". The HG-24 was apparently the first Gibson to use the new "jumbo" size and shape that we all love, and it had Brazilian back and sides. The HG-22 and HG-20 were slightly smaller, but with a shape that is somewhat similar to the jumbo, according to the photos.

 

The HG-22 and HG-20 had maple back and sides, the HG-22 with a sunburst top, and the HG-20 with an overall solid dark brown finish.

 

According to "...Flat-Tops", even after conversion for Spanish-style rather than Hawaiian-style playing, the tone produced by the guitars never became popular.

 

The unique construction features like the double rim apparently produce more of a Dobro-like sound. Apparently, the constrcution had to be quite rugged to take the extra tension of Hawaiian tuning, which is higher (therefore more string tension) than standard Spanish tuning.

 

So while rare, they may not be desirable.

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I had an HG-20 for a few years. It's an interesting sound, with some the bark and projection of a wood bodied dobro but much sweeter. The top on mine was very thing with delicate braces , although the area of top that was actually free to vibrate inside the inner wall was pretty small. It was great for blues and ragtime, and exceptional for slide, but a bit limited as a general purpose instrument.

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Interestingly, the grain of that Brazilian back is very similar to that of a little 1870's Martin New Yorker I owned back in the early 1970's. It had developed a bunch of splits slong the convolted grain, which required careful and tedious splicing in numerous places. I didn't appreciate just how difficult that job was for many years.

 

Nick, I would say that back is made of 2 bookmatched sets (4 pieces). Do you agree?

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Nick, I would say that back is made of 2 bookmatched sets (4 pieces). Do you agree?

 

That was my first thought, but I'm not sure. In my limited experience, plain sawn Brazilian like this can have funny grain discontinuities that look for all the world like joints, so I just don't know. It should be fairly obvious with an internal examination.

 

I would say the jury is out.

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Here's that ebay one you were looking for, Fred:

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1929-30-Gibson-HG-20-22-Rare-Pre-Jumbo-Player-J-45-J-50-200-Lucas-Smeck-L-0-1-/271051892093?pt=Guitar&hash=item3f1bf3a57d

 

I think JannusGuyRob was keen on it a week or so ago, and had posted the link.

 

Anyhow- I'm glad to hear the not-too-glowing tone reports... that way nobody gets too gassed up over it.

[now, maybe if the top could be flattened, the neck reset, baffle removed, bracing redone, and the woods were surgically lightened... Could be the new "Smeck" : ) ! ]

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