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I haz Slashes tone :D


FenderGuy1

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I really wonder. I am actually not a big fan - so to say - of the active pickups. Probably amp setting has more to do with it. Cheers... Bence

Well i tricked the Marshall that it was a tube amp some how, but i had the bass treble and mids set at 0 and the volume and reverb cranked and the master volume cranked to 10 and its a freaking solid state amp

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Well i tricked the Marshall that it was a tube amp some how, but i had the bass treble and mids set at # and the volume and reverb ####### and the master volume ####### to ## and its a freaking ##### ##### amp

Dammit Nate - I TOLDZ you - Sluishtone is a SECRET.

Don't give it away on a public forum.....

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Slash uses passive pickups, not that it matters.

 

What you have to realize is that a guitar player's tone in the studio is in a lot of cases different than their live tone. Slash is one of those. His live tone is more raw, and dry in comparison to his studio tones. Ace Frehley sounds completely different live (his studio tone is very mid-heavy and double-tracked). Alex Lifeson comes close (most guys with big rigs like that come close). Angus Young's live tone is his studio tone. Jimmy Page always sounded different live (sloppier too!). EVH's live tone in the DLR years was world's apart from the studio stuff. It was brash and thin. Towards the end of the Roth years (around 1984) and into the Hagar era, the improvements in gear (like wet/dry setups with dummy loads via Bob Bradshaw and all the rack stuff that came out) made it more like his studio tone.

 

That being said, all of those guys still sound like themselves no matter what.

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We are joking, Nate - of course he doesn't care.....

 

It's probably a huge compliment to him that people love and seek his tone. But he knows it comes from the hands.

 

In the end, the Slash tone chasers (I mean the serious ones that buy all of his signature gear) will just sound like themselves thru Slash gear. Vise Versa for the man himself playing thru my gear. Guitar players change their rigs all the time, but on the records (coming from a listener perspective), it's not a huge culture song like one would think.

 

Having a session player "ghost play" (uncredited!) is a culture shock. My examples? **** Wagner subbing for Joe Perry on Get Your Wings and for Ace Frehley on Destroyer, Bob Kulick subbing for Ace on Alive II, The Elder, Killers, as well as the plethora of players (including KISS axeman-to-be Vincent Cusano AKA Vinnie Vincent and, yes, Robben Ford!) on Creatures Of The Night. Big culture shock, at least for me. I was listening to "Larger Than Life" in my car the other day, and I can't believe people believed that was Ace playing. Bob is a kicka$$ player and producer.

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It's probably a huge compliment to him that people love and seek his tone. But he knows it comes from the hands.

 

In the end, the Slash tone chasers (I mean the serious ones that buy all of his signature gear) will just sound like themselves thru Slash gear. Vise Versa for the man himself playing thru my gear. Guitar players change their rigs all the time, but on the records (coming from a listener perspective), it's not a huge culture song like one would think.

 

Having a session player "ghost play" (uncredited!) is a culture shock. My examples? **** Wagner subbing for Joe Perry on Get Your Wings and for Ace Frehley on Destroyer, Bob Kulick subbing for Ace on Alive II, The Elder, Killers, as well as the plethora of players (including KISS axeman-to-be Vincent Cusano AKA Vinnie Vincent and, yes, Robben Ford!) on Creatures Of The Night. Big culture shock, at least for me. I was listening to "Larger Than Life" in my car the other day, and I can't believe people believed that was Ace playing. Bob is a kicka$$ player and producer.

Actually i might grab my marshall out now and play some AFD \m/

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Tone is not it the hands. Style and Technique are in the hands, and a part of the tone comes from how and where he picks the strings and his vibrato. But "Tone" comes from the gear, that's why they have "Tone" controls on the guitar and amplifier, and most foot pedals.

 

Q. What's that tone he gets in the Sweet Child solo. A. Wah Wah Pedal.

 

Q. How does he get that sweet sounding sustain? A. Gain.

 

Q. How does he get that warm, fat, Clapton-esque "Tone" A. Neck Pick up with "Tone" knob rolled back.

 

Q.How does he get a pinch harmonic? A. His hands.

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Tone is not it the hands. Style and Technique are in the hands, and a part of the tone comes from how and where he picks the strings and his vibrato. But "Tone" comes from the gear, that's why they have "Tone" controls on the guitar and amplifier, and most foot pedals.

 

Q. What's that tone he gets in the Sweet Child solo. A. Wah Wah Pedal.

 

Q. How does he get that sweet sounding sustain? A. Gain.

 

Q. How does he get that warm, fat, Clapton-esque "Tone" A. Neck Pick up with "Tone" knob rolled back.

 

Q.How does he get a pinch harmonic? A. His hands.

well i didn't get the clapton esque tone with the tone rolled back, i had it on full in the video, and it still sounded like slash

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well i didn't get the clapton esque tone with the tone rolled back, i had it on full in the video, and it still sounded like slash

Depending on the acoustics of the room you don't always Need to roll back the tone for what used to be called "The Woman Tone". Sometimes just a rolling back a couple numbers can smooth things out. Too much and things get muddy.

 

Like it says in someones signature (I think Searcy), "Always trust your ears".

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Depending on the acoustics of the room you don't always Need to roll back the tone for what used to be called "The Woman Tone". Sometimes just a rolling back a couple numbers can smooth things out. Too much and things get muddy.

 

Like it says in someones signature (I think Searcy), "Always trust your ears".

Yes it was Searcy that said that, and also, i Tricked that marshall that it was a JCM 800 lmao

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There are many different factors involved that end up contributing to tone and the hands are quite definitely a big part of it.Almost all guitarists have at one time or another used palm muting to deaden the "Tone" of the strings.Striking the string with the fleshy part of the fingers or thumb gives you a softer jazz type "Tone" as opposed to using a pick giving you a more brilliant "Tone".Using pinch harmonics really can impact your "Tone" by giving you the addition of another note that's an octave above the one that you fretted and also gives both notes a much sharper and brilliant "Tone".I definitely could go on with examples of the hands affecting tone but I think that I have given enough examples to prove my point.

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There are many different factors involved that end up contributing to tone and the hands are quite definitely a big part of it.Almost all guitarists have at one time or another used palm muting to deaden the "Tone" of the strings.Striking the string with the fleshy part of the fingers or thumb gives you a softer jazz type "Tone" as opposed to using a pick giving you a more brilliant "Tone".Using pinch harmonics really can impact your "Tone" by giving you the addition of another note that's an octave above the one that you fretted and also gives both notes a much sharper and brilliant "Tone".I definitely could go on with examples of the hands affecting tone but I think that I have given enough examples to prove my point.

I use a pick mostly, i have dunlop picks which contribute to the tone

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Stylistic inflections and technical nuances might add a degree of tonal distinction just barely worth mentioning, but you're not going to get an Angus tone out of an unplugged Les Paul regardless of what your fingers can do. For electric instruments, tone is almost entirely the result of equipment selection and EQ settings.

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