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Tried a Martin 000X1AE


badbluesplayer

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I tried a Martin 000X1AE at my local store. It is a 000 body style with a 25.5" scale.

 

It has a spruce top with no binding on the edges. It has 'countertop' sides and back, with a countertop neck and what I think is a Richlite fretboard.

 

It played smooth like formica and it sounded like formica. The neck feels exactly like a kitchen countertop. If I threw up on it the cleanup would be easy, I guess.

 

They just chiseled away a little of their reputation with this guitar. It should be a Sigma branded pruduct.

 

It was a horrible guitar. But maybe they could recycle old 70's countertops into new guitars and save some landfill space. Oh, I forgot, they're going to need more landfill space for these guitars, so maybe it's not so environmentally friendly. I don't know.

 

[crying]

 

000X1AE_x.jpg

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.

They've been going "green" for a number of years now. I've played a few of their more green products - as you say: Formica guitars. Not very impressive sound wise. They've really gotten into HPL on the last few years. I don't like them either. I can handle alternative woods and some synthetics, like Richlite, but some of those green guitars go pretty far out there.

 

Buyers that understand what Martin is trying to do buy those guitars knowing what is actually being used in the production of the instrument. Those that don't would definitely think - not worthy, cheap guitar.

 

 

.

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I think the Martins in that price point should be compared to other guitars in that price point. Not too impressive and I think there are lots of good looking/playing/sounding guitars that are much better for the money. Yamaha came out with a new line recently that is very impressive.

 

I've always wanted a D-28 or D-35, but even used ones are typically at the high end of my budget. Then, one day my favorite local guitar shop (Motor City Guitar) had a used Martin "D-2R" hanging in their higher end Martin display area. Looks, plays, feels,and sounds just like a D-28 with the difference being the back and sides are laminated rosewood (yes, real rosewood), and the top was satin instead of high gloss. This one had Fishman electronics installed. From what I read, Martin built them only for a few years (late 90's/early 2000's) because they were shifting purchasers out of the higher dollar guitars. I consider the laminated rosewood a good thing since it provides a much more stable structure for the life of the guitar.

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From my limited experience with acoustics, Martin does not do cheap very well. Every one in the 600 USD and under range has sounded dull and lifeless. Like Gibson they should stick to high end acoustics.

My experience as well. I was shopping for a good cheap acoustic a couple years ago and found Martin the worst in the price range.

 

Gretch, Epi, Ibanez, and Fender were the best. Fender was very hit and miss, but the hits were really nice. In fact I went with a Fender all solid wood dreadnaught that was on sale for right around $350. I was zeroing in on an Ibanez when the Fender went on sale.

 

If your shopping for a cheap acoustic you have to shop around and then buy the one you like when you find it. There was a really nice all mahogany Gretch that was just perfect. Instead of getting it right then I waited and tried a few other guitars. When I went back for the Gretch it was sold [cursing] . I tried a couple of the exact same model and none of them were anywhere near the full, rich sound of the one that got away. [crying]

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I have a $20 Yamaha from the 80s, turns out it sounds just like a '50s Martin

What model is it? I doubt it was $20 in the 80's. Yamaha has everything from $150 cheapos to custom all solid exotic woods, and they age just as nice as a Martin.

 

{I should say, a quality Yamaha will age like a quality Martin}

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I don't think any US make does cheap well! The best cheap guitar in Martin's line is the 15 series. Taylor also tries to market low price guitars, they stink! Something about having screw-heads in the fretboard is a turn off for me. If you want a good guitar under $600.00 and you don't want a Asian made guitar check out Godin's line made in Canada. The Simon & Patrick and the Seagull line are great values.

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Same material as my 2007 D12X1. Compared to other 12-strings (e.g., a 70's Westerly Guild and a few high-end Martins I've played with in GC) it is lacking hmmm..that "natural" sound for lack of a better word. Not an awful guitar, it was a gift and I happen to like the sound, but it can't stand to the ones higher up in the catalog. My only complaints are how the fake fretboard gunks up really easy as well as how when it's in the case for a while, until it warms up the back has that cold, plasticy Ovation feel to it. I do prefer it's sound over most Ovations I've tried but I'd take solid wood any day. The unfinished Spruce top does smell great though!

 

What model is it? I doubt it was $20 in the 80's. Yamaha has everything from $150 cheapos to custom all solid exotic woods, and they age just as nice as a Martin.

 

{I should say, a quality Yamaha will age like a quality Martin}

 

I agree with this, my dads 70's FG-200 actually has a hard sound to rival. Very loud with boomy bass and chiming highs.

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To an extent I think tone and sound are a combination of one's personal preferences and one's playing technique. One's also not going to get a dreadnaught sound out of a parlor-size guitar regardless of technique. I will say that a decent AE pickup setup with some EQ can do more than one might imagine.

 

That said, I think Gibbie has been smarter by having different ranges of instruments with different brands as opposed to what Martin has done with its synthetic cheapies that should indeed have a distinguishing marque. The Epi Masterbilt series, if you get a good one, is marvelous at price point. Down-price the Epis have laminated bodies and even tops, but still are quite decent for the money - but they're not Gibsons or even the Masterbilts.

 

As for the Ovations, I have a couple AEs from the early 70s that are still pretty good and I actually like them and have had them do well for me, both the early Electric Legend and the nylon string Country Artist.

 

I do think there's a place for synthetics on guitars. Them problem comes when they're poorly considered. I also think from my Ovation experience that string choice and playing technique will make a significant acoustic difference and the AE setup even can be managed if you don't consider that they should be, and be played, exactly like a J45 or vintage D28.

 

m

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What model is it? I doubt it was $20 in the 80's. Yamaha has everything from $150 cheapos to custom all solid exotic woods, and they age just as nice as a Martin.

 

{I should say, a quality Yamaha will age like a quality Martin}

Idk but my neighbour who used to play thinks its from the 80s it sounds so nice, and i got it at a garage sale, its pretty beat up but still plays fine

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I have a 000-28 and I've played my buddy's 000-18 a lot and this thing was like maybe half as loud as the all wood guitars. The richlite fretboard was o.k. It played o.k. It had a dead feel to it though. And it looks like a hockey puck, like flat black rubber.

 

I'm convinced that there's really no way to make the resin based materials vibrate very well. Wood works well because it vibrates mostly all in one direction - parallel with the grain - in the stiffest direction. This stuff just vibrates every which way because it's properties are the same in all directions. Think hockey puck.

 

They might be better off trying less expensive woods and laminated woods.

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I wish more folks did as our young "Fenderguy1" and rescue some of these old guitars.

 

We've had several somewhat similar examples where our younger forum members one way or another had rescued guitars from a dumpster or garage sale - and some of these oldie guitars if properly handled can be quite nice pieces that deserve a good home and lots of picking.

 

m

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1349202351[/url]' post='1263251']

I haven't tried out the above Martin but I've tried Epi Acoustics and I have to say they are quite dull, muffled and dry and don't sound anywhere near an overpriced Gibson Acoustic. Same goes for Squier Acoustics.

 

Maybe there is a reason the best seem overpriced.

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