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Does Gibson age the fretboard?


LarryUK

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I've never got a proper answer to this question. I've never looked at models in a shop, so. When Gibson age a guitar, do they age the most important bit, the fretboard. eg, roll the edges and polish the board? That's what I'd expect from an aged guitar. It should play 'old' not just look.

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I think my question has been missed here. When Gibson age a guitar. eg, Tom murphy. They age the body etc. But what attention is made to the fretboard?

Surely if you buy an aged guitar, the neck should be aged too? Edges rolled and fingerboard polished to mimic years of wear. When I've played old guitars, I like them because they're worn in and feel nice in the hand. Has anyone here rolled the edges of their fretboard? Polished their board?

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Guest Farnsbarns

I think my question has been missed here. When Gibson age a guitar. eg, Tom murphy. They age the body etc. But what attention is made to the fretboard?

Surely if you buy an aged guitar, the neck should be aged too? Edges rolled and fingerboard polished to mimic years of wear. When I've played old guitars, I like them because they're worn in and feel nice in the hand. Has anyone here rolled the edges of their fretboard? Polished their board?

 

I realized. What you meant but I don't know.

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I think my question has been missed here. When Gibson age a guitar. eg, Tom murphy. They age the body etc. But what attention is made to the fretboard?

Surely if you buy an aged guitar, the neck should be aged too? Edges rolled and fingerboard polished to mimic years of wear. When I've played old guitars, I like them because they're worn in and feel nice in the hand. Has anyone here rolled the edges of their fretboard? Polished their board?

 

They do, including divots and all.

 

The soft rolling of the edges of the fretboard binding however is not considered aging, Gibson Historics have this process done to them even if the guitar itself is not aged, my understanding is that this is what was done back in the 50's.

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I get the question...I just could not resist an attepmt at humor.

 

I understand the "rolling" of the edges of the fretbaord as I have a couple Strats that have this, to different degrees. There is both a softening of the edges, as in the sharp corner going away, as well as a little "dipping" between frets or more wear between them, particularly at the edges. In addition, there is more wear on the board on the top between strings, "divets" in the wood itself, instead of a flat surface as it would be when new.

 

Now, I said all that to say that from the "relics" I have played, some but not all of these details are reproduced to different degrees. So, even though the effort is made, it is a matter of opinion if it feels natural, or better. But then again, it could be opinion if a "new" flat fresh 'board feels better than a worn one.

 

When it comes to a typical Gibson, I think they wear differently and age differently because of the binding. I think it is an advantage. I don't feel that the plastic wears or "rolls" as quickly as the corner of the wood does. I think most "wear" of the binding on the top is actually the result of fret jobs done to make them fit or filing down the nibs. But while I can't say for sure (because I have not actually played one enough to wear it down myself), It certainly feels like the binding helps the fretbaord to hold it's shape at the edges. It also looks like it may shrink as well.

 

It's actually a good question- that is, how far do they go in "aging" or reproducing the wear of a well played fretboard. But at the same time, I think it is worth asking one's self how much of it makes it feel better, and how much of it is just to be convincing to make it SEEM like a well played guitar.

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Guest Farnsbarns

Ok I see what your asking now, you want to know about a Custom made guitar. There's no telling but if you pay for a Custom axe then I'm sure Gibson will entertain about any option you want to add to the final bill. [biggrin]

 

I'm not sure you do. Gibson make and sell aged guitars, many of which are custom shop models but they are still a standard run which are sent out to shops to go on shelves. These aren't custom orders.

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My question has gone off track a bit here.

When Gibson age a guitar, do they age the fretboard?

Does Tom Murphy age the fretboard?

Who owns the said guitars on here? Did your guitar come with a normal fretboard or aged.

My whole point here is, When I've played really old guitars the neck feels great. This is because of the wear and natural polishing of the fretboard.

I suppose you could get a 'mop' on the neck and polish it. What would you use? I like a smooth neck.

Does Richlite polish up nice/feel smooth?

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