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Intonation Adjustment Screws


CowboyBillyBob1

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I recently noticed that the adjustment screws on Tune-O-Matic bridges are towards the neck on vintage guitars, reissues as well. On the modern version they are facing the tail piece. Why is that? Is there an advantage to one over the other and why and when did Gibson make that change?

 

Not a life or death topic but I am just curious. [confused]

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I recently noticed that the adjustment screws on Tune-O-Matic bridges are towards the neck on vintage guitars, reissues as well. On the modern version they are facing the tail piece. Why is that? Is there an advantage to one over the other and why and when did Gibson make that change?

 

Not a life or death topic but I am just curious. [confused]

Haha yeah I noticed that too a short while back and asked the same thing..

 

And I think it was just a change that happened some time for manufacturing reasons.. And yeah its all the Reissues and vintage spec that have the ABR-1 bridge that points towards the pickups.. My LP Classic 1960 is the only one I have like that, the rest are all the newer style.

 

I dont think it really makes much difference... but in saying that my Classic does has the lowest action out of all of them and theres no buzz.. So then again maybe :-k

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The ABR-1 bridges pointed toward the neck because the other way the strings could contact the screw heads, leading to buzzes, rattles and effected break angle. The Nashville design sets the screws lower so the screws can face the tail without contacting the strings. It also has a longer intonation adjustment than the ABR-1.

 

ABR left, Nashville right - note the intonation screw placement -

 

ABR-1_Tune-o-matic_Bridge_sm.jpg. Nashville_Tune-o-matic_Bridge_sm.jpg

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Haha yeah I noticed that too a short while back and asked the same thing..

 

And I think it was just a change that happened some time for manufacturing reasons.. And yeah its all the Reissues and vintage spec that have the ABR-1 bridge that points towards the pickups.. My LP Classic 1960 is the only one I have like that, the rest are all the newer style.

 

I dont think it really makes much difference... but in saying that my Classic does has the lowest action out of all of them and theres no buzz.. So then again maybe :-k

My 2012 LP has it towards the stop piece and the action is lower than any other guitar I have and it's buzz free and intonates perfectly.

I used to own a '71 LP Custom and I do not remember which side the screws were on but I do recall having to reverse one or two bridge saddles because they would not travel far enough to intonate properly. The bridge saddles have an angle on one side and straight on the other. Reversing the sadlle so the straight side was on the side wher I needed more room to intonate properly.

Do you think the actual placement of the TOM is different on the older models?

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The ABR-1 bridges pointed toward the neck because the other way the strings could contact the screw heads, leading to buzzes, rattles and effected break angle. The Nashville design sets the screws lower so the screws can face the tail without contacting the strings. It also has a longer intonation adjustment than the ABR-1.

 

ABR left, Nashville right - not the intonation screw placement -

 

ABR-1_Tune-o-matic_Bridge_sm.jpg. Nashville_Tune-o-matic_Bridge_sm.jpg

Thanks.

That is a definitive answer and makes sense to me. My old LP had that springy wire by the screws as well. I think I lost it on the old LP.

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