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Fingerboard Conditioner


CowboyBillyBob1

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I applied some Planet Waves fingerboard conditioner (called Hyrdate) on My 2012 LP Standard. It did a nice job and even darkened the rosewood board that was lighter in color than I like. Made it nice and smooth and kind of slick but just a hair not oily.

 

I was wondering if the Richlight board on my Midtown Standard would benefit from the same treatment. Richlight is not wood (I don't think so anyway) so I am not exactly sure it would be appropriate.

 

Any of you know about caring for Richlight? I am going to Google it but thought I would check here first since I trust most of the members here.

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Hello! As Richlite is being made of cellulose and resin it's a very tough material. I don't think it's going to shrink or expand as wood would. So I don't think it needs any kind of conditioning. Cheers... Bence

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Hello! As Richlite is being made of cellulose and resin it's a very tough material. I don't think it's going to shrink or expand as wood would. So I don't think it needs any kind of conditioning. Cheers... Bence

I think you are right. I went to the Richlie site. I had no idea that it was a company called Richlite. They suggest soap and water to clean their countertops. They use this stuff to make skateboard ramps too.

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Guest rogerb

For cleaning Richlite boards just use Naptha or a mild soap and water solution, wrung out to just damp and wipe the fingerboard down.

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Chances are your 2012 LP didn't need the fingerboard cleaned or conditioned yet, unless of course you make peanut butter and jelly sandwiches with your hands, eat them with no napkins and play your guitar without washing first... [flapper]

 

Doesn't everyone do that??

 

Seriously though, the color of the rosewood board was a bit lighter than I like so the Planet Waves hydrator stuff darkened it up a bit.

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I played a Richlite board and it was kind of dull looking and I actually wondered if something like Armor All might work - like to put a touch of gloss into the texture. It was funny, but I really thought it might work.

 

[thumbup]

 

The other thing I thought was that after awhile, the board will probably get oil from your fingers into the surface, and it'll probably look pretty good.

 

If it were me, I'd put a really light coat of fingerboard oil on there and wipe it off really good. And see what happens.

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I usually find the boards on brand new guitars a bit dry, I put fret doctor on 'em as soon as I bring one home.

 

Haven't played a richlite board but I'm not really tempted to try them.

I agree with you in that lots of new fretboards are dry right out of the box. This was not the case with a richlite board.

My Midtown has richlite board and it looks and plays great so far. If the care and maintainence is as easy as it seems and it holds up over time than I am sure you will see this material on more and more instruments. Quality tonewoods are getting harder and harder to source and I suspect that in the future only the most expensive of instruments will be made from hard to get wood.

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1349555697[/url]' post='1265001']

I agree with you in that lots of new fretboards are dry right out of the box. This was not the case with a richlite board.

My Midtown has richlite board and it looks and plays great so far. If the care and maintainence is as easy as it seems and it holds up over time than I am sure you will see this material on more and more instruments. Quality tonewoods are getting harder and harder to source and I suspect that in the future only the most expensive of instruments will be made from hard to get wood.

 

Does the rich lite play like a maple fingerboard?

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Does the rich lite play like a maple fingerboard?

It actually looks and plays more like ebony than maple. That's just my take on it. I am sure others feel differently. The only way you will get a good answer is to play one yourself. Do you have any Gibson dealers nearby? I am not aware of any other manufacturer that uses it. Would love to know if there is.

 

I have never played a baked maple board. The only maple necks/fretboards I have played are Fender Strats and Tele's.

 

Richlite is not such a bad thing but old habits die hard. Guitar players are quite conservative for the most part when it comes to their guitars, myself included. Just my opinion.

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I knew it looks like ebony, I was wondering about the feel,. Is it a just Gibson's version of the same stuff Martin use's?

Richlite is Richlite, there are no "versions" of it per se. It is made by a company called Richlite not by different individual manufacturers.It does have that hard and smooth feel that ebony has but you know I am sure someone else will feel diferently.

 

Someone mentioned about giving it some Armour All but I do not think that would work since Richlite is not porus and won't soak it up at all.

 

Personally I would rather have rosewood or ebony as a fingerboard but times change and I am sure you will in the future see this stuff on more and more guitars. It's really not as bad as you might think. It's attractive, easy to maintain, and less expensive. Hard to compare it tonewise to real tone woods but my Midtown sounds great. Not sure how it would sound with ebony though.

 

I would love to hear an entire guitar made from this stuff. Who knows what it would sound like?

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Not sure I like what appears to be a resin/composite fingerboard

 

But I'm sure it will work OK and become a popular sustainable choice

 

There is something about a porous surface which is tactile and 'maturable' excepting the laquered Fender ones of course...

 

V

 

:-({|=

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Not sure I like what appears to be a resin/composite fingerboard

 

But I'm sure it will work OK and become a popular sustainable choice

 

There is something about a porous surface which is tactile and 'maturable' excepting the laquered Fender ones of course...

 

V

 

:-({|=

 

I agree with you 100%. I am not promoting the use of Richlite by any means just trying to see the reality of it's future growth in the industry.

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It!s Micarta, Martin uses it under their trade mark, Gibsin uses it under theirs. Knife makers and gun makers have used it for years. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micarta

Micarta is not Richlite. It is similar but not the same. Richlite is a trademark of a specific product. Corian is similar but again it is not Richlite.

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Made out of the same stuff in the same plant with a different name on it.

No.

 

Richlite is made from natural products while Micarta can use other stuff like fiberglass. Richlite is as a result "greener" than Micarta. In fact Richlite is made of paper. It starts out as pulp, is turned into paper and is transformed again into a dense, durable material that can be tooled like wood.

It is a much more environmentally friendly product.

I highly doubt it is made in the same plant as Richlite uses it own unique technology.

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If you bothered to read the link about Micarta you would know that it is made with fabric, or wood, or other materials, what ever the requirement is. That is why I said same stuff different name. The process is the same. The only difference is the base material and the level of luster on the finish.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenolic_resin

Both are made from phenolic resin, want to keep splitting hairs? I may a bald old man, but I can go on for days doing this stuff.

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