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Rosewood adjustable saddle (vs bone)


groovadelic
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Might try it on a MIJ Texan Paul McCartney, Does anyone know what they used? It looks like Tusq if maybe a little smoother. And what exactly is ceramic?

Adjustable bridges & the various saddle inserts have come up quite a bit lately!

 

Like you, I have a Terada-Japan-made '64 McCartney Texan (built in 2005). The saddle material is a little different than Tusq, and was probably sourced in Japan. Hard to know exactly what it is, but I like the tone of my Texan, so it's staying on there.

 

As for the ceramic saddles, the material is very hard, and nothing like Tusq or bone. Trying to lightly sand or shape it is not an easy task, and it can be chipped if you're not careful. Overall, it seems similar to any white ceramic kitchen item, but with no outer glaze.

 

On my '66 Epi Cortez, I swapped the original rosewood saddle with an old ceramic saddle I'd removed from a B-25 many years ago. Imho, the guitar sounded good with the rosewood saddle, but now sounds perfectly dialed in with the ceramic!

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bobouz,

Thanks for the prompt & helpful reply. I tried putting the Tusq saddle on the Texan, but it wouldn't slot right in like on the Kalamazoo guitars, so I put the original back on. When I strung it back up it played easier than before.

Result!

Your description of ceramic saddles is very clear - I don't recall ever seeing one, only wooden ones.

They seem to work OK on a 12-string,but the Eldorado & Frontier were definitely better with Tusq.

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bobouz,

Thanks for the prompt & helpful reply. I tried putting the Tusq saddle on the Texan, but it wouldn't slot right in like on the Kalamazoo guitars, so I put the original back on. When I strung it back up it played easier than before.

Result!

Your description of ceramic saddles is very clear - I don't recall ever seeing one, only wooden ones.

They seem to work OK on a 12-string,but the Eldorado & Frontier were definitely better with Tusq.

It's not unusual to sand a bit off Tusq to make it fit.

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Cowboy,

I sanded one a few years ago & took a tad too much off. So the saddle didn't fit exactly.

So the guitar didn't sound right & I put the wooden saddle back on. This time I found the original saddle to be so similar to Tusq I decided to leave well alone. The Texan plays & sounds better than it did anyway.

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Hmmmm, shouldn't looking at the pics do it.

They broke through after the invention of the camera and is one of the most photographed bands in rock-history.

Tell me if there's diffuse factor here.

 

No no , don't misunderstand , I'm not poo pooing ...

 

 

Am just amazed by the amount of detective work you have obviously put in

There's arguments about the 'type' of guitar that Dylan used on blood on the tracks , or of course the famous nick drake guild / not guild

 

And you know the saddle material !!

Fascinating!

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And you know the saddle material !!

Fascinating!

 

O thanx, , but isn't that just another day at the Board-office.

 

 

 

Macca with a plastic bridge?

 

This is really interesting - been writing about it many times.

As I see it, the Texan had plastic bridge, which is now replaced.

Yesterday was recorded with the plast/porcelain combo.

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Cowboy,

I sanded one a few years ago & took a tad too much off. So the saddle didn't fit exactly.

So the guitar didn't sound right & I put the wooden saddle back on. This time I found the original saddle to be so similar to Tusq I decided to leave well alone. The Texan plays & sounds better than it did anyway.

Cool!

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One of my favorite things about the board is people catching things I haven't noticed. It keeps me informed and, sometimes, humble��

 

Agree - so many levels and angles of knowledge on this Board. From the lexical stuff to highly individual viewpoints, discoveries and taste-examples.

You, for natural reasons being closer to the source, fx had chances to experience and gather things totally out of my reach.

If I have discovered a plastic bridge, a wooden saddle or a weird burst, its great to exchange them with a couple of your secrets -

that (too) must be what this place is about. msp_smile.gif

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Am I imagining it or have I seen saddles made of metal & painted white?

Over the years, I've seen some interesting stuff w/regard to adj. saddles. I once owned an Epi Texan with a brass saddle that someone had machined for it - did a nice job, too. Although I've never come across one as you describe, I wouldn't rule it out as a possibility. Also, it seems to me that Gibson experimented a bit with adj. rigs before settling on ceramic. In those days, mid to late 1950's, stuff like that would have likely found its way out of the factory rather than being trashed or archived.

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I have been playing my KALAMAZOO KG-10, (Same as an all-Hog Gibson B-15). It came from Gruhn' with the ADJ bridge with the original Rosewdood saddle. I have always wondered what a bone saddle would do. I just received a Bone saddle from Philadelphia Luthier's today.I used the same strings before and after. I took out the metal plate, because the bone saddle was tight. I gave it a fewswipes on the sandpaper, and left it tight. I just set the screws at the original height, and pushed the saddle down to the stops on the screws.All I can say is that I'll be leaving it right where it is. Between the boneb and the Mahogany it sounds noticeably more alive. The lows are louder, and the highs are ringing.All in all $20 well spent.

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I have been playing my KALAMAZOO KG-10, (Same as an all-Hog Gibson B-15). It came from Gruhn' with the ADJ bridge with the original Rosewdood saddle. I have always wondered what a bone saddle would do. I just received a Bone saddle from Philadelphia Luthier's today.I used the same strings before and after. I took out the metal plate, because the bone saddle was tight. I gave it a fewswipes on the sandpaper, and left it tight. I just set the screws at the original height, and pushed the saddle down to the stops on the screws.All I can say is that I'll be leaving it right where it is. Between the boneb and the Mahogany it sounds noticeably more alive. The lows are louder, and the highs are ringing.All in all $20 well spent.

[/quoteti

 

Sounds about right. A word of caution, however, about that metal plate. You may want to reconsider and reinstall it. Missing plates w/ceramic or bone have a tendency to let string tension create a saddle fracture - I've seem it more than a few times.

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