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Question about recording my amps sound


catnine

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I have a PC that has a mic input in the front and one in the rear and also a line input in the rear. It's an acer desktop PC and has realtek HD Audio manager. There is a mic and line level that I can adjust when I open the realtek window. I can also set the headphone and speaker outputs and there is a mixer . The mixer is where I can set the input and output levels. There is an equalizer but that seems to be just for the output or playback. There is a noise suppressor for the mic and a acoustic noise cancellation , two settings on or off.

 

I have an old radio shack dynamic mic that seems well made still in the box for at least 20 years or more. It has a screen ball end and is well made.

 

All I want to do is record the actual sound on my tube amps so I would think the mic input would be the way to go.

 

Now I have never done this before. There is a record feature and playback next to the mic and line in and also for the playback that I suppose would begin the recording.

 

Does this sound like this would work? I don't want to plug the guitar into the PC just record the actual amps speaker sound.

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If your amp has a head phone jack, try that. I do that all the time. I plug electric guitar into amp, adjust effects volume etc, then run a guitar cord from the headphone jack to a digital recorder (or computer). You will need an adaptor to fit your computer jack.

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Neither of my amps have a out jack or headphone jack. I have adapters to fit the mic into the pc's mic input. I wanted to try to get the amps speaker sound only. I don't even know if that will end up sounding right or like the amp. I am not looking to record along with anything just me and the guitar and amp.

 

All I do know is my pc has it's own recorder built in it's a realtek HD audio manager and has a line and mic level adjust and you can hear the mic and playback through the headphones from what the manual states.

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You can do it through the mic in, but expect to hear latency (a delay between what you play and what you hear on the laptop) and possibly other problems in your sound. Well actually, when you say it has a recorder built in, are you referring to the onboard Realtek sound drivers? Or is your PC actually equipped to record? My laptop also has the Realtek HD system, and besides the latency I've found it also colors the sound in a negative way. If you're looking to do a few simple recordings demoing the amp/guitar sound you'll probably be okay. If you want to record some tracks, it would benefit you a lot to invest in a recording interface. There are plenty of entry-level USB recording interfaces you can grab for under $200, such as the M-Audio M-Box. Not stellar quality but they'll give you a decent low-latency recording and make it MUCH easier in the future if you wanna lay down some tracks. Do you have a DAW of some sort as well? Or are you just using Windows Sound Recorder?

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have a PC that has a mic input in the front and one in the rear and also a line input in the rear. It's an acer desktop PC and has realtek HD Audio manager. There is a mic and line level that I can adjust when I open the realtek window. I can also set the headphone and speaker outputs and there is a mixer . The mixer is where I can set the input and output levels. There is an equalizer but that seems to be just for the output or playback. There is a noise suppressor for the mic and a acoustic noise cancellation , two settings on or off.

 

I have an old radio shack dynamic mic that seems well made still in the box for at least 20 years or more. It has a screen ball end and is well made.

 

All I want to do is record the actual sound on my tube amps so I would think the mic input would be the way to go.

 

Now I have never done this before. There is a record feature and playback next to the mic and line in and also for the playback that I suppose would begin the recording.

 

Does this sound like this would work? I don't want to plug the guitar into the PC just record the actual amps speaker sound.

 

In regard to a pc with an adequate soundboard installed, there's a 1/8" 'mic in' and 'line in' inputs on the computer. I use a 1/4" adapter to plug into the line in input of the computer and run the line to the main out of a small mixer and feed the microphones capturing the guitar amp into the mixer. The computer runs a free audio recording/editing software called Audacity. The desktop speakers on the pc act as the monitors and I can plug in a pair of headphones there to isolate the sound. That's my micro-studio in a nutshell. Of course depending on the quality of the equipment you use, quality of microphones, mixer, computer soundcard and lots of memory (so you don't get latency or time/memory related issues) you can cut a pretty decent track. Audacity allows you to multitrack, so I endup tracking rhythm guitars first, add some bass, percussion, and then vocals. It's convincing to hear the finished product. Even though I hate playing with myself on the recording (no pun intended) because I realise how bad my time gets from hacking with jerks at open mic night. I have to use a clicktrack. I'd rather at least have a second pair of engineer hands to work the recording because it's labour intensive to get where you want to go.

 

This sort of thing used to cost multi thousands of dollars back in the day when a recording session was a big deal. Nowdays any moron with a pocket full of money can obtain and operate decent equipment from a music store and record at home.

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If you have a sound-card with a line in you want to plug an external mixer in to it and use a microphone (plugged into the mixer) on your guitar amp. A few test recordings experimenting with microphone placement and level's on the mixer will likely be necessary so take your time. In most all case's the microphone in-put's on consumer sound card's are terrible while line in's are not to bad.

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I have a perfectly nice little PC with a quite nice sound card. Using Audacity to record from a nice Shure mike placed in various places at the amp/PA speaker of my little AE Kustom 30-watter, I concluded that it wasn't very good at all.

 

Then came an inexpensive USB input I could attach to the amp or, if needed, probably a mike. I went direct input from the amp. I'm surprised at the sound quality from what amounts to a super cheapie rig. Note that the USB would entirely bypass the standard sort of sound card and stuff that's IMHO not all that well designed for recording. I figure USB input gives a more direct line to the recording software/mixer than messing with a sound card that plays well, but basically was designed to handle voice in as for Skype or such - not music.

 

m

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