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I'm FINALLY a proud new Gibson owner!


crazytrain513

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So it FINALLY happened. And I couldn't be more excited.

 

After months of going back and forth between the Les Paul & the Jackson RR5, I'm pleased to say that I just purchased my first Gibson yesterday and am feeling very optimistic about it: a new, 2012 Gibson Les Paul Studio in Satin Yellow!

 

I apologize for the length of this post, but I have a few questions that I would really appreciate answers for. I'm sorry if any of these are repetitive and have been asked too many times before

 

1) I've noticed a lot of people speaking about quality issues on these guitars coming out of the factory lately, so I was wondering if anyone would be able to tell me specifics to look for when my guitar arrives (its being shipped from a Guitar Center's dist. center so I haven't seen it yet). I've read countless times in forums right here that "not ALL studios are the same in quality" and there are lemons out there, so what could I look for now in order to weed those out immediately at the store? I understand wood quality and even-frets are big ones to look for. Anything else?

 

2) Is there any special care needed for a satin finish? I've never had one before and while "character" is important, I would love to keep this finish looking nice for as long as possible.

 

3) I hear having 10s on a Les Paul is the same as having 9s on a normal, jumbo-fret guitar...is that true? Because I've always used 9s in my day and I hear this guitar comes set up with 10s and I'm a little nervous about that.

 

Thanks for all that take the time to read this and respond. I'll be putting up pics soon of my baby when she arrives :)

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So it FINALLY happened. And I couldn't be more excited.

 

After months of going back and forth between the Les Paul & the Jackson RR5, I'm pleased to say that I just purchased my first Gibson yesterday and am feeling very optimistic about it: a new, 2012 Gibson Les Paul Studio in Satin Yellow!

 

I apologize for the length of this post, but I have a few questions that I would really appreciate answers for. I'm sorry if any of these are repetitive and have been asked too many times before

 

1) I've noticed a lot of people speaking about quality issues on these guitars coming out of the factory lately, so I was wondering if anyone would be able to tell me specifics to look for when my guitar arrives (its being shipped from a Guitar Center's dist. center so I haven't seen it yet). I've read countless times in forums right here that "not ALL studios are the same in quality" and there are lemons out there, so what could I look for now in order to weed those out immediately at the store? I understand wood quality and even-frets are big ones to look for. Anything else?

 

2) Is there any special care needed for a satin finish? I've never had one before and while "character" is important, I would love to keep this finish looking nice for as long as possible.

 

3) I hear having 10s on a Les Paul is the same as having 9s on a normal, jumbo-fret guitar...is that true? Because I've always used 9s in my day and I hear this guitar comes set up with 10s and I'm a little nervous about that.

 

Thanks for all that take the time to read this and respond. I'll be putting up pics soon of my baby when she arrives :)

Hello welcome and congrats on your first Gibby.. You wont regret that... Theres nothing quite like them (but then I would say that being a member here ;))

 

So..

 

1, Personally ive never seen these issues talked about here. But I put that down to the guitar shop I buy from. They wont let a bad one out.. However the things to look for which people most complain about...

Rough edges on the fret ends.. thats a bad one.

Bad set up and buzzing strings

And the finish is sometimes not 100% so just give it a good look over.. Some people have scratches some worse.. (be fussy, its worth it, it will only annoy you otherwise ;))

 

When I buy a guitar one of the things I always do is play it unplugged first. Cos if you can hear sustain and ring unplugged you know it will sound good plugged in (usually).. Check the neck is straight and play some hi and low notes on each string and do a few bends etc.. Then just check the knobs are all working and the pickup selector switch. (and push/pull knobs on the 2012s)

 

Also make sure you play it through an amp as similar to the one you have at home as possible.. Its easy to get carried away when they plug you into some super expensive Marshall or something :)

 

The last thing I always tell people is to try as many guitars as possible before you buy it.. Even more than one of the same colour and model can feel and sound slightly different as they are all hand finished so no two exactly the same.

 

2, Satin finish does not require special treatment, but if youve never had a Gibby, know that the Nitrocelulose finish they use can react with some types of plastic and rubber. So if you have it on a stand make sure you cover any rubber parts with some kind of cotten or cloth (belive me its worth it cos ive been hit by that once).

 

3, Strings as with everything is subjective.. I use Super Slinkys (9s) on all of mine.. Always have.. So you will just have to try a faw and see what works for you. But they are usually set up for 10s which is what they usually come with so if you do change the guage you will have to re-intonate the guitar (which is easy)

 

Hope that helps..... And good luck with it.. and post some pics [thumbup] (no pics and it didnt happen :P)

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Hello welcome and congrats on your first Gibby.. You wont regret that... Theres nothing quite like them (but then I would say that being a member here ;))

 

So..

 

1, Personally ive never seen these issues talked about here. But I put that down to the guitar shop I buy from. They wont let a bad one out.. However the things to look for which people most complain about...

Rough edges on the fret ends.. thats a bad one.

Bad set up and buzzing strings

And the finish is sometimes not 100% so just give it a good look over.. Some people have scratches some worse.. (be fussy, its worth it, it will only annoy you otherwise ;))

 

When I buy a guitar one of the things I always do is play it unplugged first. Cos if you can hear sustain and ring unplugged you know it will sound good plugged in (usually).. Check the neck is straight and play some hi and low notes on each string and do a few bends etc.. Then just check the knobs are all working and the pickup selector switch. (and push/pull knobs on the 2012s)

 

Also make sure you play it through an amp as similar to the one you have at home as possible.. Its easy to get carried away when they plug you into some super expensive Marshall or something :)

 

The last thing I always tell people is to try as many guitars as possible before you buy it.. Even more than one of the same colour and model can feel and sound slightly different as they are all hand finished so no two exactly the same.

 

Very informative, exactly what I was looking for. The advice about playing the guitar without an amp is actually a really good idea -- thank you for that. Pure genius. And as for trying a lot of guitars...I think I've probably played fifty Studio LPs in the past couple months and I understand exactly what you mean by the feel. I'm hoping that when mine comes in (they're saying Thursday), that I get lucky the first time around so I don't have to order another one and wait even longer...

 

2, Satin finish does not require special treatment, but if youve never had a Gibby, know that the Nitrocelulose finish they use can react with some types of plastic and rubber. So if you have it on a stand make sure you cover any rubber parts with some kind of cotten or cloth (belive me its worth it cos ive been hit by that once).

 

Very clever idea there as well. That I will do. I hear these Satin finishes start glossing up with time. Is there a way to avoid that? I like having an "unfinished" look to the guitar and it does wonders for the neck.

 

3, Strings as with everything is subjective.. I use Super Slinkys (9s) on all of mine.. Always have.. So you will just have to try a faw and see what works for you. But they are usually set up for 10s which is what they usually come with so if you do change the guage you will have to re-intonate the guitar (which is easy)

 

Intonation is unfortunately something I never learned how to do *sigh*. Slinkies are what I use as well but I guess I can try out 10s for a bit and see how that goes.

 

Hope that helps..... And good luck with it.. and post some pics [thumbup] (no pics and it didnt happen :P)

 

I'm new to this whole forum thing but my replies look to be embedded between yours up top ^^. Thank you for the very thorough reply and Pics soon I PROMISE =]

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On the string issue, I bought my first Gibson a few months ago, and I have always had 9's on my Ibanez in the past. I am still trying to decide if I like the 10's. I am thinking I will switch back to Super Slinky 9's when I get a tune up by a Luthier friend in a couple of months.

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On the string issue, I bought my first Gibson a few months ago, and I have always had 9's on my Ibanez in the past. I am still trying to decide if I like the 10's. I am thinking I will switch back to Super Slinky 9's when I get a tune up by a Luthier friend in a couple of months.

 

Yes I remember I put 10s on my previous guitar ONE time and I found it to be such a huge change...not only in the bending effort and thickness, but just the sound as well. Apparently since the Les Paul has a less lengthy neck, these issues aren't seen? I've always been a slinky man myself.

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I'm new to this whole forum thing but my replies look to be embedded between yours up top ^^. Thank you for the very thorough reply and Pics soon I PROMISE =]

No worries :)

 

And if you don't want to include the quote in your reply just delete it from your post. But adding it send an email to whoever you quoted. But if it's long then just delete it all or just keep one line in or something.

 

And with the satin finish. Yeah they can fade a bit or shine up depending on how you play. But I've had a double cut faded which is a similar finish for about 4 years now and it still looks good. :)

 

Also you can edit your posts so you can change it if you want even after you post.

 

And intonation is easy. It's about the guitar staying in tune the whole way up the neck. Usually checked by playing and open string then the 12th fret on the same string. They should both be in tune. And you change it by moving the little screws on the bridge back and forwards :)

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Yes I remember I put 10s on my previous guitar ONE time and I found it to be such a huge change...not only in the bending effort and thickness, but just the sound as well. Apparently since the Les Paul has a less lengthy neck, these issues aren't seen? I've always been a slinky man myself.

 

One thing you might want to try is wrapping your strings Over the stopbar tailpiece. Basically, instead of inserting the string from the back, insert it from the front, then wrap it back over the tailpiece and pass it over the bridge. This decreases the angle of the strings passing over the bridge, and generally makes them feel a little easier to bend and fret. It's what I do with my tuneomatic/stopbar guitars. Makes a huge difference.

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One thing you might want to try is wrapping your strings Over the stopbar tailpiece. Basically, instead of inserting the string from the back, insert it from the front, then wrap it back over the tailpiece and pass it over the bridge. This decreases the angle of the strings passing over the bridge, and generally makes them feel a little easier to bend and fret. It's what I do with my tuneomatic/stopbar guitars. Makes a huge difference.

 

Oh wow I never even thought of that...does that have any effect on the natural vibration and resonance from the bridge though? I would think it would hinder the bridge slightly at the same time? Maybe I need to take up some more acoustic. I hear that builds an enormous amount of finger strength...

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Oh wow I never even thought of that...does that have any effect on the natural vibration and resonance from the bridge though? I would think it would hinder the bridge slightly at the same time? Maybe I need to take up some more acoustic. I hear that builds an enormous amount of finger strength...

 

I was worried about that too, so I got my sound engineer buddy over and did some comparatives. Strung regularly and strung over the tailpiece. Same strings, brand/gauge everything, playing the same notes with the same amp with the same settings...no discernible difference. The only difference was that the one strung Over the tailpiece was easier to play.

 

-Ryan

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Welcome to the Gibson club bud! I love reading new Gibson guitar posts, especially FIRST Gibson guitar posts, because it reminds me of how excited I was when I got my pretty white Les Paul =)

 

I personally play D'Adarrio 10-gauges and they last a LONG time...I've had sets last over 2 years of steady playing. The other reason I like them is because they are always ready to go. They aren't dry like other strings out of the pack. So no sweat-grease or breaking in required.

 

I prefer 10-gauge on Les Pauls due to the thicker tone. Honestly 10s are average.

Knowing we are both huge Randy Rhoads fans, Rudy Sarzo said Randy used to play heavy 13-gauge strings on his Les Paul Custom, but I'm not sure which brand. He said he had a really light touch when he played them though.

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I was worried about that too, so I got my sound engineer buddy over and did some comparatives. Strung regularly and strung over the tailpiece. Same strings, brand/gauge everything, playing the same notes with the same amp with the same settings...no discernible difference. The only difference was that the one strung Over the tailpiece was easier to play.

 

-Ryan

 

Very interesting take, will definitely look into that thanks!

 

I'm seriously considering the EVH route and thinking about just boiling my strings before putting them on...I'm very curious to see how that works haha.

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One thing you might want to try is wrapping your strings Over the stopbar tailpiece. Basically, instead of inserting the string from the back, insert it from the front, then wrap it back over the tailpiece and pass it over the bridge. This decreases the angle of the strings passing over the bridge, and generally makes them feel a little easier to bend and fret. It's what I do with my tuneomatic/stopbar guitars. Makes a huge difference.

If you do that you should screw the stop bar all the way down so that it makes contact with the guitar top. The theory is that by doing this you increase sustain. That is the main oint of doing it. It does also make the feel a bit more slinky and easier to bend because of the decrease in the angle over the bridge. You have to make sure the strings do not touch the back of the bridge. Not likely but still something to look at if you do this.

 

I suggest that you leave the guitar as is and see how you like it. Then change the guage if you wnt but re intonate the guitar so it plays in tune all over the neck. If you get any buzzing than a small adjustment to the truss rod is needed. Not a big deal at all but you should know what you are doing before screwing around with the truss rod.

 

Smll changes to a properly set up guitar can have other areas that need to be adjusted to compensate.

 

Then again you may make the change and all is cool.

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Very interesting take, will definitely look into that thanks!

 

I'm seriously considering the EVH route and thinking about just boiling my strings before putting them on...I'm very curious to see how that works haha.

The point of boiling strings is to do that after they get dirty so you can prolong the life of the string. You would not do that when the strings are new. I am sure if EVH did do that to used strings it was when he was unknown and struggling. Since EB Slinky's are like 4 bucks a set I personally do not think it is worth the trouble.

 

By the way EB's Cobalt strings are fantastic. Try a set even though they are twice the price of regulat Slinkys.

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If you do that you should screw the stop bar all the way down so that it makes contact with the guitar top. The theory is that by doing this you increase sustain. That is the main oint of doing it. It does also make the feel a bit more slinky and easier to bend because of the decrease in the angle over the bridge. You have to make sure the strings do not touch the back of the bridge. Not likely but still something to look at if you do this.

 

I suggest that you leave the guitar as is and see how you like it. Then change the guage if you wnt but re intonate the guitar so it plays in tune all over the neck. If you get any buzzing than a small adjustment to the truss rod is needed. Not a big deal at all but you should know what you are doing before screwing around with the truss rod.

 

Smll changes to a properly set up guitar can have other areas that need to be adjusted to compensate.

 

Then again you may make the change and all is cool.

 

Hm I unfortunately have never taken the time to learn how to perfect my guitar specs in ways such as adjusting the truss rod, intonating, adjusting pickup height etc...I regret it so this is an art of perfection I have yet to master. Does adjusting action mean you have to adjust intonation as well?

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The point of boiling strings is to do that after they get dirty so you can prolong the life of the string. You would not do that when the strings are new. I am sure if EVH did do that to used strings it was when he was unknown and struggling. Since EB Slinky's are like 4 bucks a set I personally do not think it is worth the trouble.

 

By the way EB's Cobalt strings are fantastic. Try a set even though they are twice the price of regulat Slinkys.

 

You're not the first person to tell me that so I'm highly considering it, thanks for the heads up! How are they different in terms of playability?

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The point of boiling strings is to do that after they get dirty so you can prolong the life of the string. You would not do that when the strings are new. I am sure if EVH did do that to used strings it was when he was unknown and struggling. Since EB Slinky's are like 4 bucks a set I personally do not think it is worth the trouble.

 

No, not at all. Edward, myself, quite a few others, boiled our strings prior to putting them on our Stracaster type guitars in the event we were doing any Molten Metal Hairy Riffalicious Dive Bombtastic Fireworks. Boiling them first would expand them far as they could, then contract them far as they could, thus ensuring in our minds at least, that they would stay in tune better. They don't last when you do that, I was a regular user of a set of strings per gig, each set boiled before hand, not ahead of time, but usually that afternoon. When you have a handful of guitars it got expensive, so it was not ever about economy or cleaning them.

 

I boiled strings on up into my 40s before I stopped. Actually took a while to get used to not doing that. A weird chapter in guitar history, but there it is.

 

rct

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No, not at all. Edward, myself, quite a few others, boiled our strings prior to putting them on our Stracaster type guitars in the event we were doing any Molten Metal Hairy Riffalicious Dive Bombtastic Fireworks. Boiling them first would expand them far as they could, then contract them far as they could, thus ensuring in our minds at least, that they would stay in tune better. They don't last when you do that, I was a regular user of a set of strings per gig, each set boiled before hand, not ahead of time, but usually that afternoon. When you have a handful of guitars it got expensive, so it was not ever about economy or cleaning them.

 

I boiled strings on up into my 40s before I stopped. Actually took a while to get used to not doing that. A weird chapter in guitar history, but there it is.

 

rct

 

 

That's what I remember reading too as a reason for Eddie's doing so.He would boil his new Fender strings prior to stringing them for 15 minutes bc they would stay in tune better (his Floyd always untuned his guitar) & the expansion made it easier for him to bend notes too. Though don't quote me on this because I could be wrong.

 

I was actually half-kidding about actually boiling my strings but its interesting to see that people actually do

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You're not the first person to tell me that so I'm highly considering it, thanks for the heads up! How are they different in terms of playability?

Ive heard REALLY good things about those strings.. Im waiting for my local shop to get some in and will try them for sure..

 

 

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No, not at all. Edward, myself, quite a few others, boiled our strings prior to putting them on our Stracaster type guitars in the event we were doing any Molten Metal Hairy Riffalicious Dive Bombtastic Fireworks. Boiling them first would expand them far as they could, then contract them far as they could, thus ensuring in our minds at least, that they would stay in tune better. They don't last when you do that, I was a regular user of a set of strings per gig, each set boiled before hand, not ahead of time, but usually that afternoon. When you have a handful of guitars it got expensive, so it was not ever about economy or cleaning them.

 

I boiled strings on up into my 40s before I stopped. Actually took a while to get used to not doing that. A weird chapter in guitar history, but there it is.

 

rct

That's interesting. Do you feel that it helped keep the string more stable. There are manufacturers that wind the string while its core is being stretched thereby getting more windings per inch. Do you think the boiling thing is an attempt to do that sort of thing.

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C

Hm I unfortunately have never taken the time to learn how to perfect my guitar specs in ways such as adjusting the truss rod, intonating, adjusting pickup height etc...I regret it so this is an art of perfection I have yet to master. Does adjusting action mean you have to adjust intonation as well?

You should do that if you change your action. It is very easy to adjust intonation on a tune-o=matic bridge.

Check Googe and you will find loads of instructional videos. You need a quality tuner to do this accurately I personally like the Peterson Strobo Clip. It is way accurate and portable. Best $70.00 I ever spent. They make other models like an in line stomp box or desktop and rackmount models.

 

Strobo Clip

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That's interesting. Do you feel that it helped keep the string more stable. There are manufacturers that wind the string while its core is being stretched thereby getting more windings per inch. Do you think the boiling thing is an attempt to do that sort of thing.

 

I think it did help stretch the string to the point of it not stretching anymore. My honest-to-USA very Purple Kramer with it's DiveBombah knockoff of Floyds bridge did stay in tune pretty well no matter what I did, and I rarely locked the nut. Edward always not only played with really good intonation but had a pretty solid string between the two locking points. So I think it worked. I gabbed with him during The Gary Year down here in AC, and he still used two locking points but by that time did not boil strings any more.

 

I hated using those things and was glad when my life allowed me not to. I have the bar on my current strat, but that's first time in very many years.

 

rct

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I got caught up in the dive bombing antics in the late '80's and bought myself an Ibanez RG560 in neon orange.

24awv87.jpg

That's not my guitar but it looks the same. I put in neon green Dimarzio's in the neck and bridge and you basically had to wear sunglasses when you took it out of it's case. It was loud even before you plugged it in. Paper thin neck, locking nut, Ibanez's take on a Floyd, you know the deal.

 

What a pain in the pooper to set that thing up. God forbid if you wanted to change string guages because now you had to reset the springs on the back so it floated flat and parallel to the top. Not to mention intonating it. I still have it but never use it. Maybe the next time I have like 10 hours to spare I'll pull it out and set it up. It stayed in tune but I always had to fiddle with the fine tuners on the bridge.

Just not into violent tremolo bar stuff any longer. It just sounds like a dated cliché.. hit an open harmonic and Weeeee!! EVH obviously knows what he is doing with it. After all he pretty much invented that style and is part of his trademark sound.

I have the tremolo on my strat blocked so I never use that. The Bigsby on my Midtown Standard is perfect. Nice subtle vibrato used judiciously works for me.

 

I've definitely gone 180 degrees and am so happy to have my 2012 Standard. Having an LP back in my hands is a real joy.

 

Don't think I will be boiling strings any time soon. Sorry if I went a bit off topic but to the OP.. an LP is a beautiful thing. Play it like it is set up out of the box for at least a few weeks before you start making changes. This way you will have a baseline to work with.

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C

You should do that if you change your action. It is very easy to adjust intonation on a tune-o=matic bridge.

Check Googe and you will find loads of instructional videos. You need a quality tuner to do this accurately I personally like the Peterson Strobo Clip. It is way accurate and portable. Best $70.00 I ever spent. They make other models like an in line stomp box or desktop and rackmount models.

 

Strobo Clip

 

Hm is it possible to intonate by ear? I have never really used a tuner -- I think having a Buzz Feiten tuning system on my last guitar was good in the sense that I could tell EXACTLY what perfect pitch was, but at the same time, the intonation was always so spot on I never really had to intonate my guitar at all because it was always so perfect.

 

I'll definitely take a look into it.

 

I hear a lot of people talking about how when they received their guitar, they needed to have the nut filed down a bit because the strings were getting caught...how do you determine that that's an issue and not something else such as the tuners or something like that?

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I got caught up in the dive bombing antics in the late '80's and bought myself an Ibanez RG560 in neon orange.

24awv87.jpg

That's not my guitar but it looks the same. I put in neon green Dimarzio's in the neck and bridge and you basically had to wear sunglasses when you took it out of it's case. It was loud even before you plugged it in. Paper thin neck, locking nut, Ibanez's take on a Floyd, you know the deal.

 

What a pain in the pooper to set that thing up. God forbid if you wanted to change string guages because now you had to reset the springs on the back so it floated flat and parallel to the top. Not to mention intonating it. I still have it but never use it. Maybe the next time I have like 10 hours to spare I'll pull it out and set it up. It stayed in tune but I always had to fiddle with the fine tuners on the bridge.

Just not into violent tremolo bar stuff any longer. It just sounds like a dated cliché.. hit an open harmonic and Weeeee!! EVH obviously knows what he is doing with it. After all he pretty much invented that style and is part of his trademark sound.

I have the tremolo on my strat blocked so I never use that. The Bigsby on my Midtown Standard is perfect. Nice subtle vibrato used judiciously works for me.

 

I've definitely gone 180 degrees and am so happy to have my 2012 Standard. Having an LP back in my hands is a real joy.

 

Don't think I will be boiling strings any time soon. Sorry if I went a bit off topic but to the OP.. an LP is a beautiful thing. Play it like it is set up out of the box for at least a few weeks before you start making changes. This way you will have a baseline to work with.

 

 

I LOVE the idea of Floyd Rose's but I never found it to be a necessity for myself just because of all the work. I go between Standard, Drop D, and half-step a lot and I think it would just be such a pain for me to deal with over time. I love messing with them at guitar stores but owning one...I dont know.

 

I'm actually more of a one-guitar at a time person as I'm a "starving college student" as we're called so unfortunately, I need to find guitars that suit most of my taste all in one package. The Les Paul seems to be that one (she's coming in tomorrow!) but I'm really hoping the upper fret access is something I can get used to, and something that won't limit me from playing a lot of higher-end solos (I play a lot of Van Halen and Iron Maiden).

 

There's just something about that Les Paul bite you get from the higher registry notes that you don't quite get from Jackson/Ibanez/ESP etc. Ah I can't wait.

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Hm is it possible to intonate by ear? I have never really used a tuner --

If your ear can detect 1/10 of a cent (that is 1/1000 of a semitone) than God has blessed you.

Take your guitar to a store that sells Peterson tuners and first tune by ear then check that against these most accurate of tuners and see how much you are off if at all.

That will give you the answer you seek. My money is on you being way off and will discover how beautiful it is to play a well intonated and tuned guitar.

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