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Valeriy

From where traces its origins hard rock?

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And also in further other hard styles.

Though before there was Paul McCartney’s Oh! Darling. And then the idea of hard rock begins to hover in the air [thumbup] , it seems [rolleyes] . And this idea was picked up by Deep Purple [thumbup] . Hard manner of singing are only in the chorus of Oh!Darling . In Deep Purple’s songs such singing is already at once from the beginning.

 

This is also interesting video of Deep Purple. [flapper]

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I wouldn't class Paul's singing in "Oh Darling" or even the more soulful "Oh Woman,Oh Why"(flip side of "Just Another Day" 45) as hard rock but they are both along the lines of the old blues wailers.Screamin' Jay Hawkins was another great singer of that genre.James Brown,Little Richard and even Joe Tex and Janis Joplin could really wail out the blues when necessary.

 

The Troggs,Blue Cheer,The MC 5,The Blues Magoos,The Electric Prunes,The Amboy Dukes (with a young Ted Nugent) and several others,were among the avant guard of what was to evolve into hard rock.

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And also in further other hard styles.

Though before there was Paul McCartney’s Oh! Darling. And then the idea of hard rock begins to hover in the air [thumbup] , it seems [rolleyes] . And this idea was picked up by Deep Purple [thumbup] . Hard manner of singing are only in the chorus of Oh!Darling . In Deep Purple’s songs such singing is already at once from the beginning.

 

 

This is also interesting video of Deep Purple. [flapper]

 

 

Man, I just love the guitar tone of the late 60s and early 70s hard rock, very pure, raw and unprocessed. Its just guitar, non true bypassed pedals and a loud no master volume tube amp. NICE!!!

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Depends on what 'hard rock' is, for you. For instance the Stones in their 70s heyday were fine, hard rock....I think.

 

EDIT; apologies - I misunderstood the OP.

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I wouldn't class Paul's singing in "Oh Darling" or even the more soulful "Oh Woman,Oh Why"(flip side of "Just Another Day" 45) as hard rock but they are both along the lines of the old blues wailers.Screamin' Jay Hawkins was another great singer of that genre.James Brown,Little Richard and even Joe Tex and Janis Joplin could really wail out the blues when necessary.

 

The Troggs,Blue Cheer,The MC 5,The Blues Magoos,The Electric Prunes,The Amboy Dukes (with a young Ted Nugent) and several others,were among the avant guard of what was to evolve into hard rock.

 

Thanks, bonzoboy, for these bands. OK, I will listen to them.

As regards Oh Darling I read this thing had to get to the White Album in 68th. But that version was too soft and Paul set aside it until the next time. I.e. he specially cogitated about the song to do it in a hard (heavy) version. And he was in search of this new hard version. In 69th, so, he has done this for the Abbey Road.

Also Deep Purple deliberately took their hard style under the influence Ritchie. Other bands ,perhaps, did this unconsciously and not so bright. Of course, this is my subjective opinion.

 

Man, I just love the guitar tone of the late 60s and early 70s hard rock, very pure, raw and unprocessed. Its just guitar, non true bypassed pedals and a loud no master volume tube amp. NICE!!!

 

Yep, :) I also like Ritchie’s guitar, its tone. By the tone his guitar competes (in good sense) with Gillan’s voice. And maybe therefore they quarreled [crying][lol] .

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I tend to agree with Bonzoboy so much that there's not much to add but some more explanation.

 

Even before electric guitar, some blues guys basically were yell/singing. I'm normally a laid-back blues singer/player, but on Stormy Monday with an electric band and PA late in a saloon, I've tended to howl it both vocal and guitar. Don't ask me why. It just seems sometimes to be "right" and at other times I almost whisper it gently.

 

I think some Russian "modern folk" music was like that for a long time also. A growling yell that I have heard. It is not that much different from the old blues "yellers."

 

If you have no amplification... a guitar or even piano and voice has to be pretty loud for any sort of venue.

 

Then when "we" got amplification, we kept the styles because that is how people heard us. Others liked the basic sound and soon... it has been given a name.

 

m

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Others liked the basic sound and soon... it has been given a name.

 

m

 

Yep, and I'd hone in on this a little: critics & contributing writers to music rags retroactively categorize & pigeonhole music. People who need to be told what to wear read about it in Rolling Stone etc., and follow right along.

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Hi, Milod and Brundaddy.

But I should notice that Deep Purple literally burst to us with their new style, Highway Star etc .

And even for some time with the appearance of them, many have forgotten earlier favorite bands such as Led Zeppelin and Creedence, for some time, of course.

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Valeriy...

 

I do not think music has ever had so much innovation as "we" say here.

 

Take an early (1925-35) American "hillbilly" band playing Muleskinner Blues and give them electric guitars and a PA, and I think they would sound like "rock." Even "hard rock."

 

We all play from our own "roots."

 

Some of that is the music we heard as children. Some of it is the music we heard as teen-young adults. Some is music we learned to appreciate as adults from those early "working grown-up" years.

 

But those are our roots.

 

We can invent music, we can play with intent to sound "different." We cannot play what is not part of us.

 

m

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Hi, Milod and Brundaddy.

But I should notice that Deep Purple literally burst to us with their new style, Highway Star etc .

And even for some time with the appearance of them, many have forgotten earlier favorite bands such as Led Zeppelin and Creedence, for some time, of course.

 

You should also notice that Steppenwolf was pretty similar to Deep Purple, & came out at the same time. But that's not the point. "Hard Rock" is a term made up by critics. So are "Heavy Metal," "Classic Rock," "Prog," etc. Many, many, many people go right along with whatever critics & writers tell them what's up.

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Brun...

 

I can't argue your point on the categorization of music styles but... i think it does help in some ways even though it's far from some sort of science as in categorizing species and such.

 

m

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Well, yes, I've heard Steppenwolf. Indeed it looks like well maybe except for the guitar of Ritchie with its sound. But with the advent of the DP, this is a coincidence or not, it already was necessary to name this style since it already stands out among the others.

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Brun...

 

I can't argue your point on the categorization of music styles but... i think it does help in some ways even though it's far from some sort of science as in categorizing species and such.

 

m

 

Certainly names & categories are useful points of reference in trying to describe music styles. "Hard rock" is a construct, named retroactively by either a writer or a record company executive in order to sell magazines &/or records. Thus, the birth of "hard rock" was in some hack's typewriter, not on any record.

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While I'll agree that "hard rock" came from a typewriter rather than a record, back in the olden days it did help to differentiate some of the more "pop-rock" and sweet stuff stuff from some of the more raw material. Heck, IMHO, not even Chuck Berry really qualifies as "hard rock," but Link Wray did sort of sometimes...

 

<grin>

 

m

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There have been a few very good documentaries on this topic including "Metal: A headbangers journey" and most recently a multi-part series on VH1 that was quite good.

 

Metal Evolution

 

One could argue its accuracy, although this thread would seem to support the same groups of influences as the documentary does.

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And also in further other hard styles.

Though before there was Paul McCartney’s Oh! Darling.

 

It all started in Mississippi Delta Blues them moved to Memphis Sun Studios. Then to Chicago. Then to Liverpool and London.

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