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Is there any ADVANTAGE to a wrap-around TP?


heymisterk

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It seems like mostly I just hear about the disadvantages of a wrap-around tailpiece, namely intonation.

 

Yet, I still see some great guitars made with them: some Hamer, Heritage, Collings, and PRS.

 

I owned one guitar - a PRS SE - with a wrap-around, and never really had a problem with intonation. But I notice even the high-end, USA PRSs have a wrap-around.

 

What say you?

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Hello!

 

I think You two are not talking about the same thing. Wrap-around tailpiece is what Heymisterk is talking about, CoreyT - You have posted a video on wrapping over the strings on a tailpiece of a guitar with bridge/tailpiece combination.

 

@Heymisterk: Wrap-around tailpieces without bridges seem to be trendy these days. Setting them for perfect intonation can be very tricky, since this solution doesn't allows strings to be set individually. All You can do is to move the tailpiece away from the posts, which will affect all of the strings together. There are many adjustable replacement tailpieces for this kind of guitars to solve the setting issues, like Schaller's.

 

@CoreyT: The video was great anyways. I was thinking about trying this, but now I dropped this option.

 

Cheers... Bence

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Wrap-around bridges/tailpieces are IMO a 'cheerful' economy approach to 'what to do where the string ends'

 

I have a couple of electrics this way equipped

 

Never noticed any intonation issues...but that may be the style of music...

 

The great LP Junior often has a wrap-around and fits with the general ethos

 

The great advantage to a wrap-around is 'one less thing to worry about'

 

Thereby increasing playing time and general fun having of... [thumbup]

 

V

 

:-({|=

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Thanks Bence, you are correct.

Yes, some tail pieces come that way, and then there are those that take a regular tail piece and wrap over it.

 

I was not functioning fully yet, had not drank my coffee yet :D

 

No problems! You actually did help me with Your post! The last few days I was thinking about ways of improving the sustain of my LP further. After watching this video I am convinced not to scratch the chrome on it's tailpiece by trying this! So, thanks! :) Cheers... Bence

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The theory behind the "modern" wrap-around combo is that without the separate bridge, there is more direct string vibration transfer to the body, and therefore increases tone and sustain.

 

The original (50's/60's) wrap-around bridge combos were simply cost saving measures.

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Intonation is over rated.

 

By the time you add pressure to the strings and add vibrato it's a moot point.

 

I have two wrap around type guitars and the intonation is almost perfect on both.

 

Hello! When those new Melody Makers appeared a year or so ago, I became very excited about the blue SG. An interesting Gibson guitar, at great price. A real workhorse, no bling, just the raw wood and metal. Although I was skeptical about the practicality of the wraparound tailpiece. When I went to my local shop to give it a try, I thought it will be uncomfortable, will not ring properly, in general: it would be awkward. To my surprise it sounded and felt great! I didn't check how perfect the intonation was, tough. Why would've I bothered with it? The guitar sounded great! Cheers... Bence

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Example of simple perfection.

 

And I like to post pictures,msp_biggrin.gif

 

556630_519961741350543_578044542_n.jpg

 

Great ones! Wish Gibson made this Black Beauty with the single humbucker in neck position! And I also wish I could afford one if they decide to make one... :) Real beauties! Congratulations! Evidences of fine taste! Cheers... Bence

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Intonation is over rated.

 

By the time you add pressure to the strings and add vibrato it's a moot point.

 

I have two wrap around type guitars and the intonation is almost perfect on both.

 

That was my experience when I had the PRS SE, as well as the USA PRS I played and loved: the tuning was right on the money.

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Intonation is over rated.

 

By the time you add pressure to the strings and add vibrato it's a moot point.

 

I really wish you would stop interrupting internet guitar wisdom and hear say as experience with actual facts and how guitars work and such. Thanks.

 

rct

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Ages ago I had a couple wraparound tailpiece guitars I worked on as beaters-to-turn-into-guitar projects to make a cupla guitar bucks.

 

I didn't detect much of concern about the tailpiece - but I think a poorly setup cheapie guitar may have problems but again, is that the setup problem instead of the type of tailpiece. Get the neck set up right and assuming any decent, not even "good," construction, and it shouldn't be a problem. I wonder if it might be with flatwounds, but even in the early '70s, I never saw anybody using flats on a wraparound.

 

m

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I've only ever had 2 issues with wraparounds. The first is bridge lean. Because the strings are pulling Up on the bridge rather than putting pressure down on a TOM, the tolerances on the bridge and the posts have to very precise or the bridge will lean forwards on the posts. I fixed this on my '64 Melody Maker by putting a TonePros locking wraparound on it.

 

The second issue pertains only to vintage wraparounds really. Wraparounds in the 50's and 60's (at least the early-mid 60's) were all intonated for a Wound G string. With a plain G, it's impossible to intonate these things. Hence why I switched to the TonePros locking wraparound, which has individual adjustable saddles.

 

But the tone is unbeatable. Never cared for TOM's, in look, tone or feel.

 

-Ryan

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When's the last time anyone set the intonation on their acoustic? :-k

 

Very good point... but maybe electric players are more likely to mess around with different string gauges than our old fashioned acoustic pals and so we need a bit more tweakability?

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