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KarNac

New to guitar

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Hello Gibson Forum Members,

 

 

I am currently 38 years old and have never played guitar. I had the dream to play guitar like Eddie Van Halen as a child but now as an adult, I just want to learn to play music on the guitar. I have done research on the internet and went to the guitar store with additional questions. After hearing and feeling a number of guitars in my hand. I prefer the Les Paul, the SG a distant second, and don't like the feel or the sound of Fenders (Strat/Tele). Now I like the sound and features on the Mustang I amp also the VOX but the store didnt have one set up, but undecided on my first starter guitar. I was thinking Les Paul 100 but the store steared me towards the Special II, and also was told the SG Special was good also since it has that mid sound. Now I need some advice from the members, which starter guitar and amp?

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KarNac,

 

Welcome to the forum!

 

I am currently 38 years old and have never played guitar.

 

Then you know nothing other than what others tell you....not being nasty or mean...think about it.

How do you know that you will be able to learn?

If you do, how do you know you will like it enough to stick with it?

 

You can get a good or bad model/setup in ANY guitar regardless of cost.

Got any friends that play??

Ask them for some help and suggestions.

Take them with you when picking out your first guitar.... Hell, if you live around Ann Arbor, Michigan, Send me a PM and I'll help you.

I've got good to great playing guitars (none for sale) that cost from $20 to thousands. I'd be happy to show you the differences.

 

You can buy a used Special II/ L.P.100/ L.P.Studio off C.L. for $100 - $200. If after 3 months or so you decide to stick with it...great.

Sell your learner and take a loss of $50 - $100 bucks. Big Deal!

You couldn't rent one for that.

 

By then you will have an idea what you like or don't like about your reference point.

Once you have any playable guitar we can help you with set up...

Just go here:

http://mysite.verizon.net/jazz.guitar/guitarsetup.htm

 

As to local guitar store....If it's a mom and pop shop...maybe.

I'm just a bit tired of big box places taking advantage of beginners.

 

Anyway, just a few things to think about,

 

Willy

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My two cents -- get a good acoustic guitar and a good electric guitar with amp. Much learning is done acoustically as the temptation to work with sounds in the amp is avoided.

Another two cents -- get a good instructor, or a good self-paced instruction method. Check out www.learnandmaster.com for Learn and Master Guitar.

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I know this is an Epiphone forum, but for LPs I really think Rondo Music is the way to go if you can't get a Gibson (and maybe even then).

 

http://www.rondomusic.com/

 

Their AL-2000 line is as good as Epi's LP 100's, maybe as good as the LP Studios, and for far less $.

 

Take a look at their "Rootbeer Flame" AL-2000... ( http://www.rondomusic.com/al2000rootbeer.html )

 

al2000rootbeer5.jpg

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KarNac,

 

Welcome to the forum!

 

 

 

Then you know nothing other than what others tell you....not being nasty or mean...think about it.

How do you know that you will be able to learn?

If you do, how do you know you will like it enough to stick with it?

 

You can get a good or bad model/setup in ANY guitar regardless of cost.

Got any friends that play??

Ask them for some help and suggestions.

Take them with you when picking out your first guitar.... Hell, if you live around Ann Arbor, Michigan, Send me a PM and I'll help you.

I've got good to great playing guitars (none for sale) that cost from $20 to thousands. I'd be happy to show you the differences.

 

You can buy a used Special II/ L.P.100/ L.P.tudio off C.L. for $100 - $200. If after 3 months or so you decide to stick with it...great.

Sell your learner and take a loss of $50 - $100 bucks. Big Deal!

You couldn't rent one for that.

 

By then you will have an idea what you like or don't like about your reference point.

Once you have any playable guitar we can help you with set up...

Just go here:

http://mysite.verizo...guitarsetup.htm

 

As to local guitar store....If it's a mom and pop shop...maybe.

I'm just a bit tired of big box places taking advantage of beginners.

 

Anyway, just a few things to think about,

 

Willy

 

Willy, Ilive in Belleville!!! Where neighbors!!!!

 

KarNac, I agree with most in the idea of taking a friend that plays to the big box places. I am a be fan of getting an instructor. I started at 35 -now 41 and for the first 2 yrs did the self training. It was good, but got better with a music instructor and dedicated practice time. Now, I am working on meeting folks to play with to continue my learning and dedicated practice time LOL.

 

Good Luck and Welcome to the forum.

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I bought the GT Special last Friday. I had to take it back for repair as the tone knob isn't working properly and there's some noise on the toggle switch. other than that, I love this guitar, action is awesome, very easy to play. I'm a bass player from way back and I always had a 6 string electric to fool around on but none sounded as good as this one. Couldn't believe it for the low cost. i taught myself how to play Miserlou (**** Dale Surf tune) this past weekend. heck, I,ve never been able to play a song on a six string start to finish in all these years, lol. Like I said, easy to play man.

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For a Les Paul model, Agile may be the best bang for the buck (sorry). But Les Pauls are heavy for their size. For a learner, I would recommend a Sheraton, Dot, Riviera, or Casino as I find them to be more comfortable while sitting and practicing. Keep scale length in mind, as short scale are easier on the fingers. I think you may find the SG models neck heavy, and the Sheraton type models better balanced.

 

If you do go for an Agile LP, get a high end model. Both of mine are gems (rootbeer, and cherry burst).

 

Please consider a Sheraton. My fave of Epiphones.

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For a Les Paul model, Agile may be the best bang for the buck (sorry). But Les Pauls are heavy for their size. For a learner, I would recommend a Sheraton, Dot, Riviera, or Casino as I find them to be more comfortable while sitting and practicing. Keep scale length in mind, as short scale are easier on the fingers. I think you may find the SG models neck heavy, and the Sheraton type models better balanced.

 

If you do go for an Agile LP, get a high end model. Both of mine are gems (rootbeer, and cherry burst).

 

Please consider a Sheraton. My fave of Epiphones.

 

 

+1 on the Dot. But if a sg/lp is his focus maybe a wilshire or the upcoming crestwood or coronet would be a better weight/balance for a beginner. They are light , and well balanced, scale length is awesome and the new pickups are awesome. I plan to get the coronet or the crestwood my self.

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Hi , and welcome!

Have you ever thought about borrow a guitar first instead of spend the money and loosing interesting to play?

Maybe somebody in your neighbourhood has an old unused one, that he lends you for a while.?

But IMO you shouldn´t buy a cheapy in quality guitar. If you don´t get the sound you expect, you´ll think it´s maybe your playing.....but that´s wrong very often.

If you buy a good quality and sound guitar it mustn´t be expansive.

You can also have a look for used ones on the internet in your price range.

I also wouild say if you buy a Epiphone, you are never wrong...doesn´t matter which one. I would suggest a semi-hollow, so that you have a louder sound unplugged while exercising.

Godd luck

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I would like to thank you all for the great input. I will see if an old friend of mine has some advice who has played as long as I known him. Also I will have to compare the Agile to Epiphone, and the wilshire I will look into. I do not care to borrow anything from anyone, so that will not be an option. bI have thought of the semi hollow models, will have to check into them and not interested in acoustic at all, not the sound, feel or look. As of right now, I am leaning towards the Epi LP 100 and the Epi LP Studio and will have to grab a SG again and see how it feels again. I am going to keep looking and researching, and hoping to hear more of your input

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You mentioned the Mustang I

I have it and love it! There are lots of amp sounds to listen to and get an idea of what you like. You can use headphones wich is great for me. i payed $40 for mine used.

only warning with that, try to spend more time playing it than tweaking it! It has 24 channels. I have mine set up like this: first eight for humbuckers, next eight for single coils, last eight for p90’s

 

i had a washburn acoustic that was amazing for six years before I went electric. I had a bunch of lessons, but... in todays world you can probably just start off with Utube vids of chords and such.

 

I was lucky that my first electric was IMO high quality, played like a dream! It really inspired me to play. It was a Gibson les paul studio Lite.

 

If you can find anyone that is maybe in a similar situation, learning and playing wth them is great, and you both will inspire the other to learn more.

 

If you found a local shop, opposed to a chain guitar store, maybe they could help you, at least make sure it's set up properly for you. Some cheap guitars are awesome!

I freaking LOVE my epiphone special I with P90 pickups! $100 shipping included.

Other cheap guitars are just garbage and no fun to play....... but a good local store wouldn't push that on you!

Good luck!

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I agree with so many other points already made, and to sum my feelings up....

 

Take a friend who plays to the nearest large shop and get him to play every cheap acoustic there until he finds one that's reasonably good, and then get him to fettle the bridge and nut (some dirt cheap acoustics sound and play beautifully if properly sorted)

 

If you make progress, you can always buy something better, and if you don't improve, you can sell the cheapo to someone else.

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After researching the Agile copies, I think I will stay away from something I can't physically hold and play. Also the Agile is heavier than the Epi.

The semi hollow body guitars are cool and I like the 339, but at those prices, I will look for something less expensive for a starter guitar.

I greatly appreciate everyone advice, but this guy has no interest in acoustic, sorry.

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I'm playing a Nighthawk through a Mustang 1 at the minute to learn on. Got to say it's an excellent combination.

 

Don't have any presets saved I just use the computer as I go. It's not hard once you figure your way around it.

 

Stick Rocksmith on the Ps3 A Y plug on the guitar cable and play through the amp using fuse for the presets. [biggrin][thumbup]

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It is a good idea to sit down and get the feel of a guitar even if you don't know how to play one yet. I learned on a Sears Silvertone acoustic guitar I refinished. My father had bought it in the 1930's for $5. It had amazingly good action for such a cheapie.

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Find someone you know who knows guitars and ask him to help you find a good used guitar. Guitars depreciate fast unless it's a nice vintage guitar.

 

You can get a whole lot more guitar for your money if you look for used one.

 

If you like archtop guitars look for an Ibanez Artcore model such as an AS73 or AS75. I saw these in my local CL today for $170 and $200.

 

For a LP type Guitar I found a PRS Tremonti SE for $200.

 

The point is you can get a lot nicer guitar for <$300 if you buy a "GOOD" used guitar

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What kind of music do you plan on playing? It makes a difference on which guitar you might want to buy

 

If you like the 339, the Epi Dot is a great guitar at a low price, and very versitle

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Okay...

 

Here's my take. I started in '63 with an incredibly lousy cheapie but... although I didn't know if it was playable, the guys in the guitar store played it and it sounded decent and a customer in the store diddled with it a bit and said that in effect it's a lousy cheap guitar but that it played well. It was a classical guitar with a bit of a narrower nut width. We had a lotta oddballs in those days 50 years ago.

 

Anyway, my point is that regardless what you spend, a local store "touch before buying" is a good idea. Research two "root" chords and even if you have to carry in a diagram of how to make them, do it so you can actually go "strum-strum" before you put your money down. That will not bring laughter, it will show that you basically know nothing, but really do want to play guitar and want a piece that you actually can play. That brings respect unless the sales people aren't somebody you should buy from anyway.

 

I've bought mail order quite a bit 'cuz I'm way in the American Outback. I'm no luthier by any stretch, but I know enough to generally sorta know if I've got a pickle and have to send it back. You don't know that much, so buying in a store even if it's a higher price on the same instrument model will be worth it.

 

Also, I think you're wrong in not wanting a small acoustic or inexpensive AE that then is strung in the store with 9-42 strings that are what you'd play on an electric. It appears you mostly wanna play lead, but you ain't going to be ready for a stage for a least a month or two even if you work at it eight hours a day on the beast as I did at 17.

 

IMHO You really should learn basic root chords first. They're the same on an electric or classical or flattop or whatever. You learn rhythm and timing perhaps best doing some basic stuff that you can sing along with. You can take a flattop to a barbecue and be a hero. Then when you can play enough to accompany "she'll be comin' around the mountain," you can think better about what kinda electric you want.

 

Lessons are good - or bad. Make sure that if you pay for 'em that you'll learn something that will help you do what you wanna do - but the basics are the same whether folk, rock or country. I s'pose classical or jazz teachers may do things differently. But you'll need to know what chords you're playing and how they work in different keys, etc., etc., no matter what you do in "pop" music of any variety.

 

Yeah, it ain't fast track, but you ain't 40 yet and there's a lotta years to go and probably have to work for a living on the side of learning guitar.

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Learning towards ESP LTD EC-256 or Epi g-400 faded. Also that Nighthawk is in the back of my head.

Tried the LTD, great feel, nice cut-out, and really liked the sound.

Don't know much about amps, learning towards the mustang 1 yet.

More and more I am listening to music and watching youtube, I like the classic rock and the jazzy sounds. I like my ad/dc, metallica, and kidrock music also, but that jazzy/blues sound is pretty cool when playing guitar.

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Okay...

 

Here's my take. I started in '63 with an incredibly lousy cheapie but... although I didn't know if it was playable, the guys in the guitar store played it and it sounded decent and a customer in the store diddled with it a bit and said that in effect it's a lousy cheap guitar but that it played well. It was a classical guitar with a bit of a narrower nut width. We had a lotta oddballs in those days 50 years ago.

 

Anyway, my point is that regardless what you spend, a local store "touch before buying" is a good idea. Research two "root" chords and even if you have to carry in a diagram of how to make them, do it so you can actually go "strum-strum" before you put your money down. That will not bring laughter, it will show that you basically know nothing, but really do want to play guitar and want a piece that you actually can play. That brings respect unless the sales people aren't somebody you should buy from anyway.

 

I've bought mail order quite a bit 'cuz I'm way in the American Outback. I'm no luthier by any stretch, but I know enough to generally sorta know if I've got a pickle and have to send it back. You don't know that much, so buying in a store even if it's a higher price on the same instrument model will be worth it.

 

Also, I think you're wrong in not wanting a small acoustic or inexpensive AE that then is strung in the store with 9-42 strings that are what you'd play on an electric. It appears you mostly wanna play lead, but you ain't going to be ready for a stage for a least a month or two even if you work at it eight hours a day on the beast as I did at 17.

 

IMHO You really should learn basic root chords first. They're the same on an electric or classical or flattop or whatever. You learn rhythm and timing perhaps best doing some basic stuff that you can sing along with. You can take a flattop to a barbecue and be a hero. Then when you can play enough to accompany "she'll be comin' around the mountain," you can think better about what kinda electric you want.

 

Lessons are good - or bad. Make sure that if you pay for 'em that you'll learn something that will help you do what you wanna do - but the basics are the same whether folk, rock or country. I s'pose classical or jazz teachers may do things differently. But you'll need to know what chords you're playing and how they work in different keys, etc., etc., no matter what you do in "pop" music of any variety.

 

Yeah, it ain't fast track, but you ain't 40 yet and there's a lotta years to go and probably have to work for a living on the side of learning guitar.

 

 

Thank you for the advice!

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