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Is this a J-45 being played ?


EuroAussie

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I cant quite work out if the logo is the old school Gibson logo and if this guitar, played by the male guitarist on the right is a J-45 ?

 

Its by The Waifs, which is one of my (and Mrs EA's) favourite roots / blues Australian bands.

 

Both guitars have a very Gibson tone, I know shes playing a Maton but cant quite work out if he is playing a J-45 ? (there is a close up at the 4:00 mark where he plays some tasty lead)

 

I think it might actually be a different brand, sounds good to me though, love these guys.

 

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Well it's all a bit jumpy to be sure. What is certain is that there is no banner, and if it is a Gibson logo (I suspect in the end that it is, though your hunch about another firm might just be right), it is the old script logo. Also it has the oh so 1930s small sunburst That all would suggest a pre-J45 jumbo model, though I'm pretty certain it's a modern reissue (Bozeman if Gibson). No visible teardrop pickguard to counter the pro-1930s stylings. So your most likely bets are a J35 or an OJ. Difficult to make out the depth of the guitar at the front, despite one pretty decent shot of that particular dimension. Could be as deep as the back end, which would suggest OJ, though I'd have thought a J35 reissue would be more likely in terms of numbers that seem to crop up for discussion/admiration here. I would expect the logo to be white on either OJ or 35, and at one point here white does seem to be the colour. But later on things look quite golden. He's plugged in, so I wouldn't go too far in relation to tone, but it certainly does sound dry and crackling, more so than the typical 45/SJ. My money is on a recent 30s reissue. Probability is for the J35, but I would take a punt on an OJ if you gave me decent odds.

 

PS. To my ears the Maton doesn't sound in any way like a Gibson. More like a turd. The Jumbo in question does sound very good though. As does the song taken as a whole. Not too keen on the main lyrical conceit, however. Bad lyrics make me cringe, which is why I added no vocals to the track that you wanted them on.

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As for inspired by, EMin7, Bob's your uncle...

Being from abroad, I never understood that phrase. Always thought it meant something a´la

on the bottom-line we're all in family

or maybe

yeah yeah, you tell me Bob (Dylan) is your uncle and what do I know.

Now had to look it up, still not sure – does it mean
you're on the right track/in the neighborhood of the issue.

- and is there an extra sub-thing I ought to be aware of
??

 

Just trying to stay on the wagon here.

 

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Being from abroad, I never understood that phrase. Always thought it meant something a´la

on the bottom-line we're all in family

or maybe

yeah yeah, you tell me Bob (Dylan) is your uncle and what do I know.

Now had to look it up, still not sure – does it mean
you're on the right track/in the neighborhood of the issue.

- and is there an extra sub-thing I ought to be aware of
??

 

Just trying to stay on the wagon here.

 

 

 

More like "and there you have it" or "you're all set" or "you're good to go". All a a bit idiomatic, like of a lot of English.

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Being from abroad, I never understood that phrase. Always thought it meant something a´la

on the bottom-line we're all in family

or maybe

yeah yeah, you tell me Bob (Dylan) is your uncle and what do I know.

Now had to look it up, still not sure – does it mean
you're on the right track/in the neighborhood of the issue.

- and is there an extra sub-thing I ought to be aware of
??

 

Just trying to stay on the wagon here.

 

 

Even as a native speaker I am none the wiser as to the origin of the phrase or why it means what it means. As Nick says, it's just an idiom, like many, with roots lost somewhere in the past. Idioms surely work like this in all languages, but I do find that of the languages I speak, English and then French are most disconnected from their roots in terms of why things mean what they mean. French words are still a bit closer to the components that make them up (the Brits having mostly no idea of the meaning of the French and German components that make up their words). But German and Hungarian both seem to have a clearer sense of words built up out of clear components. So perhaps their idioms are sometimes a bit easier to follow.

 

Perhaps Bob's your uncle is a reference to those awkward family arrangements whereby an illegitimate birth to a particularly young mother might be hastily covered up by the grandparents assuming parentage in public. So that the child would grow up believing that his mother was in fact his older sister, and that her younger brother Bob was also his brother. The revelation that Bob is in fact the child's uncle changes the game very quickly, and explains in one sudden phrase why the older sister is so much older than the child, and more of a carer than the official parents. If Bob is his uncle, then the sister must be his mother, n'est-ce pas? And Bob's your uncle - you were born to me early and out of wedlock. Just a theory, but worthy of consideration...

 

As for extra sub-texts, I think you've essentially got it in the reference to Dylan. But to be very explicit, the point is that he copied Bob's very own J45, so it was inspired by Bob, who was effectively therefore an uncle to this guitar. Which does not, of course, explain why it looks so much more like a J35.

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