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Playing out in the cold


passthej45

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We are supposed to play a patio gig this Friday evening. The temp is supposed to be in the 40's(that's Farehheit of course) . I'm a little concerned about the guitar and my finger's response. I have a J 45 Standard. Now I'm not talking about testing the limits of human endurance, I just was wondering what's practical and is it possible to still have a good gig. Any input or experiences ya'll can relate to me would be greatly appreciated..............

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We are supposed to play a patio gig this Friday evening. The temp is supposed to be in the 40's(that's Farehheit of course) . I'm a little concerned about the guitar and my finger's response. I have a J 45 Standard. Now I'm not talking about testing the limits of human endurance, I just was wondering what's practical and is it possible to still have a good gig. Any input or experiences ya'll can relate to me would be greatly appreciated..............

 

40's Sorry the price of the gig just went up to cover my snowmobile suit.

Seriously I believe that's a bit to chilly for my taste

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Wear gloves with the fingers cut out of them. I'm not joking. I wear them on saturday mornings at the Farmers Market. Also, since you're playing in the evening, it's naturally cooler, maybe the upper 30's instead of the low 40's or so. Also, if it's windy, it's a whole different ballgame. Definitly wear some kind of hat, even a hooded sweatshirt as part of the deal. A breeze on a cool evening can make it a cold evening. Not trying to scare you away from the gig. Just dress for it being a bit cooler than you're expecting. You can always take-off a jacket. You'll be fine if you are prepared. Better being prepared than freezing your *** off. I hope it goes well. [thumbup]

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I would not take the guitar straight from a warm house into temperatures like this. If possible, let it acclimate, in the case, for a couple of hours in similar temperatures before taking it out to play.

 

 

Great minds....

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Thanks for the tips and ideas guys. We have to set up the pa then usually sit back and have a cocktail before starting so I think the guitar will have time to adjust. Also I just heard the the bar owner is planning on setting up a few of those heaters, so fingers crossed , it might be ok. I'll let y'all know how it went

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If your a lead guitarist your screwed.. : )

If your just strumming & singin you is ok.

Id try and get one of those nasty blasting dome heaters & set it up behind me to shield guitar just in case. Drummers generate they're own heat , guitarists dont. : )

My fingers go from liquid to chop sticks in the cold.

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Thanks for the tips and ideas guys. We have to set up the pa then usually sit back and have a cocktail before starting so I think the guitar will have time to adjust. Also I just heard the the bar owner is planning on setting up a few of those heaters, so fingers crossed , it might be ok. I'll let y'all know how it went

 

Good move from the bar owner to consider heating outside for the gig - unless you have a very solid following of supporters your band will be the only ones outside. Everyone else will be looking for warmth inside????

 

 

BluesKing777.

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Cold ambient temperature + patio heater + nitro finished J45 = instant finish checking.

 

Sounds a nightmare to me. You may well want finish checking to appear gradually as the guitar ages, but 20 years' worth in one gig would scare me. All good advice on the in-case acclimatization business, but the overall situation would persuade me to take my beater and risk sounding less good. Unless you can charge enough to pay for restoration of your Gibson to original condition (so for a new Gibson, then). It's less the cold itself (checking occurs when the guitar warms up too quickly from a cold start, rather than the other way round, I believe), than the fluctuations that the outdoor air and the heater will produce together. Also, I'd worry about having my Gibson too near one of those heaters anyway. It would be a bit like playing next to an open fire - too much dry heat, too close. Potentially worse with that gas - more like playing next to a furnace.

 

PS. As a Brit born in the 1970s, I do have some inkling of Fahrenheit, but really only at freezing point and boiling point. So 32 and 212 mean something to me, but I'm not old enough to have the everyday knowledge of what 40s or 80s or such might mean. Not far above freezing, but what are we talking in celsius? 5 or so? Cold enough for snow?

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Cold ambient temperature + patio heater + nitro finished J45 = instant finish checking.

 

Sounds a nightmare to me. You may well want finish checking to appear gradually as the guitar ages, but 20 years' worth in one gig would scare me. All good advice on the in-case acclimatization business, but the overall situation would persuade me to take my beater and risk sounding less good. Unless you can charge enough to pay for restoration of your Gibson to original condition (so for a new Gibson, then). It's less the cold itself (checking occurs when the guitar warms up too quickly from a cold start, rather than the other way round, I believe), than the fluctuations that the outdoor air and the heater will produce together. Also, I'd worry about having my Gibson too near one of those heaters anyway. It would be a bit like playing next to an open fire - too much dry heat, too close. Potentially worse with that gas - more like playing next to a furnace.

 

PS. As a Brit born in the 1970s, I do have some inkling of Fahrenheit, but really only at freezing point and boiling point. So 32 and 212 mean something to me, but I'm not old enough to have the everyday knowledge of what 40s or 80s or such might mean. Not far above freezing, but what are we talking in celsius? 5 or so? Cold enough for snow?

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PS. As a Brit born in the 1970s, I do have some inkling of Fahrenheit, but really only at freezing point and boiling point. So 32 and 212 mean something to me, but I'm not old enough to have the everyday knowledge of what 40s or 80s or such might mean. Not far above freezing, but what are we talking in celsius? 5 or so? Cold enough for snow?

 

 

40F= 4 Celsius.

 

A radiant heater would be extremely dangerous for a guitar, since they heat up objects (like a guitar) rather than air.

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Yeah, if you can, leave the J45 at home and take a beater .... heck go buy one if necessary. A general rule: if you need a tool (beater guitar in this case) once, you'll probably need it again in the future, so invest now .... also a good excuse to buy another tool.

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As it has been said here I'd be really worried about finish checking in this situation. Rapid fluctuations of cold to hot, hot to cold will do a number on your finish. If you like the relic look go for it.

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As it has been said here I'd be really worried about finish checking in this situation. Rapid fluctuations of cold to hot, hot to cold will do a number on your finish. If you like the relic look go for it.

 

That's the other side of it, if you like the relic look or want to age your guitar without any compressed air tricks, go for it....

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That's the other side of it, if you like the relic look or want to age your guitar without any compressed air tricks, go for it....

 

I've saw a relic'ing video on a Gibson where the guy heated up the finish with a propane torch and then blasted it with a CO2 fire extinguisher. YIKES! Instant finish checks.

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Here is a show we did in 40 degree weather -- it was inside, but no heat on a really cold day. At least we were moving -- you generated a fair amount of heat when playing, but that may not help your extremities [confused] .

 

A lot of missed notes at transitions.

Show

 

Let's pick,

 

-Tom

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Here is a show we did in 40 degree weather -- it was inside, but no heat on a really cold day. At least we were moving -- you generated a fair amount of heat when playing, but that may not help your extremities [confused] .

 

A lot of missed notes at transitions.

Show

 

Let's pick,

 

-Tom

 

 

Whoever was doing the lights for you wasn't helping matters any.

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Whoever was doing the lights for you wasn't helping matters any.

 

Yea, that was special. Not all that common in a bluegrass venue, but hey it is the 21st century -- a few modern trimming are ok so long as the music is always totally acoustic and traditional :-({|= .

 

Best,

 

-Tom

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