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Perspiring pickguard


ksdaddy

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Even weirder than the guitar itself.

 

A few years back I took it out of the case and saw beads of water on the guard. The guard is clear Lucite or plexiglass of some other sort. I wiped it off and the guard had kinda a rough texture. I figured it was outgassing and deteriorating from it being left in the case. Fuzzy memory but I think I removed the guard and gave it a good buffing with some kind of wax or polish, probably thinking that would decrease or eliminate the outgassing. The house wasn't humid, in fact it was a constant battle to keep it about 25% in the winter. I took it out of the case today, probably hasn't been out in several months, and found more "sweat".

 

Hard to capture with a camera but if you see spots on the guard and haziness along the bottom edge, that's water. So am I supposed to just 'not' put it back in the case unless it's going somewhere?

 

nlssr7.jpg

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The plastic is probably in it's final death throws holding together. I agree that outgassing, is the issue. I doubt that this is actually H2O water. My theory is that as it is outgassing, the liquid fraction of the guard, instead of evaporating is accumulating on the surface, due to it's sequestration in the case. If you leave it out of the case, the liquid (probably not water) will evaporate as fast as it comes to the surface. I also notice that the fretboard bracket is corroding. The side bracket is showing green on the end too.

 

One wonders if you could spray on a layer of clear coat (after cleaning it up). I may stop or slow the out gassing... or might cloud up making things worse.

 

It's quite possible that being segregated from the atmosphere, the guard may hold together longer. Morphing into a crumbly powder or a pile of primordial goo is inevitable.

 

I suspect this guard is not long for this world. Best get a copy made as soon as you can. Tracing and cutting a replacement out of lucite would be simple enough. Copying the logo, is another matter. Good Luck! I wonder if a plastics engraver could copy it, by tracing the original? You know... if a guy had a Dremel tool..... ? :huh:

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Meh. If it's dying, it's dying. I paid $50 for the guitar in 1986. I took a lot of ribbing back then, now it's a collector's item.

 

Amazing how it only has condensation (for lack of a better word) on the guard itself. The rest of the guitar is bone dry.

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That's entirely possible because there is a minimal amount on TOP of the guard and it's got cat/dog hair in it, so it's likely contacting the case fuzz. The beads of water are underneath. But nary a swipe of moisture on the rest of the guitar. I suppose if the guitar is finished in lacquer it could absorb some...maybe. If that had a poly finish on it, there might be beads of sweat in that area.

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I hit reply before I read your body finish remark. That's another possibility I never thought of. I, too, would think it's gassed all it was going to, ever, especially since it's not in an adverse environment. Not ideal, but not 'bad'.

 

The guard having much less hygroscopic qualities than the guitar finish and all.

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That is a strange phenononem. I would agree that it sounds like the plastic is gassing.

I once had a '68 Byrdland with a disinagrating pickguard. It would gas-off and leave a moist-cloudy residue on the body as well, after being shut up in the case. The pickguard was actually consuming itself from the middle.

Of course, I removed it and had a very nice replica made by Mirrabella Restorations while the 'getting was good'. Before long there was not much left but pieces and binding.

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I'll betcha the plastic is not giving anything off. It might just be a product of the humidity and/or temperature cycling up and down. Just guessing it happens because when the relative humidity goes up in the case, the wood absorbs moisture from outside the case and then when the humidity goes back down, the water condenses on the pickguard because it can't evaporate completely. If the pickguard has a rough texture, it will generate more condensation than a flat surface.

 

Maybe because of the difference in the way the two materials react to changes in moisture?

 

Can you wipe some of it off the pickguard and smell it or whatever to try to tell what it is?

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Taste it. Go ahead... I dare ya. I triple dog dare you! [flapper]

 

To be perfectly honest, I'm pretty old school. When working on cars, I taste fluids sometimes so I can determine what's leaking. Sounds sick, but it works and saves a lot of time. And it doesn't take much - just a slight touch to the tounge and you know what you're up against.

 

Back to your pickguard... I'd be surprised if that old plastic wasn't done outgassing decades ago. That is strange.

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You "taste" the stuff you use caring for cars? I hope you know that antifreeze will destroy your liver quick, fast and in a hurry!But back to the point of this post, have you checked the lining of the case for moisture? If it is forming on the pick guard it may be a good idea to check.Also you can buy clear silicon adhesive in sheets and apply them to pick guards.

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You "taste" the stuff you use caring for cars? I hope you know that antifreeze will destroy your liver quick, fast and in a hurry!

 

He's just tasting it. You have to drink a lot of antifreeze to damage your liver.

 

 

I would suspect some sort of gassing off type thing with the pick guard but I have never seen that exactly.

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Try these guys,they have an inventory of thousands of pickguards from most makes and models and will also make up new ones-including logo-if you provide an acctual size template. http://www.pickguardian.com or here http://www.pickguardheaven.com . That's they only ones I can come up with for now but I know of an absolutely excellent one but it will take a bit of snooping through my music dealer/manufacturer inventory.

 

Edit: I came up with the webaddress of the other guys,you'll find them here: http://www.greasygroove.com Their inventory is huge and the materails and colours are endless.

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  • 5 months later...

I pulled it out of the case a few days ago and it has sweat more. And rusted (or at least left a deposit on) the metal. It's basically covered in 25+ years of smoke, dirt and crud.... and now whatever outgassing slime is coming off the guard. It's oily and will not readily wipe off. My plan is to clean the whole thing with soap and water and hang it on the wall.... the case will be available for transport only!

 

Can't let my Hopf get sick.

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I've went thru the websites of local pawnshops and found two Hopf Saturns - both with missing pickguards... :-k

 

Does the stuff go away when its out for a while. I'd take the guad off and keep it away from the guitar, you never know...don't wanna hurt the woodness. If you ever sell, re-attach the PG. Wierd.

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Does the stuff go away when its out for a while. I'd take the guad off and keep it away from the guitar, you never know...don't wanna hurt the woodness. If you ever sell, re-attach the PG. Wierd.

Woodness, thats funny as s@!t, never heard that term :P

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Does the stuff go away when its out for a while.

 

No idea. That's the grand experiment of 2013 I guess. It has me baffled particularly because there is no clear and present degradation of the pickguard material other than yellowing, which could be more nicotine than anything else. Now that I think about it, it could be something ELSE outgassing (or whatever you call it) and it's collecting ON the pickguard because it's more impervious than 90% of the rest of the guitar. This oily slime is basically all over the top of the guitar but much more obvious and palpable on the guard. It almost reminds me of mineral oil residue.

 

Jeez, I never thought of that at all. Might not be the guard at all.

 

But the plan is to clean it up, new strings, press it back into semi-regular service. It's an oddball with a lot of charm. And hopefully if it's in a guitar hanger with air circulating it won't be an issue.

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Guest Farnsbarns

I've emailed this thread to a plastics engineer. I doubt he's the forum type so no doubt anything he has to say will come to me.

 

I forgot about this thread. I asked the plastics engineer down the pub. He was pissed (drunk) and all I got was gibbering nonsense.

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