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epiphone 335 pro vs epiphone dot-difference?

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So on guitar center website they list an epiphone 335 pro and the old epiphone dot.

 

I know the more expensive 335 pro has upgraded pickups but is there anything else that is different between the 335 pro and the dot besides the pickups?

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From this photo, it also looks like it has binding on the neck which the Dot doesn't

 

http://www.epiphone.com/News/Features/Features/2012/Ltd-Edition-ES-335-PRO-The-sound-of-rock-and-roll.aspx

 

I have a 335 Pro. They are vey different than the Dot and well worth thr extra $$$ IMO. Bound neck, block inlays, decent quality keystone tuners, long 335 guard (I don't quite get that), and the neck profile is rounder. To me it feels very different than a Dot. The big selling point for many is the coil tapping. I don't use that at all, but it's a nice feature that adds versatility if you're into it. I replaced the long guard with a short for period correctness. Looks much better.

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Looks nice. I own a DOT ('02 Korean "deluxe" model with "designed by Gibson" Alnico pickups)and the newer ES 339 Pro (bound neck and coil taps - along with a smaller body of course). If I would have had the choice for the "pro" model at the time I purchased the dot, I probably would have jumped on it. While I really like my dot the way it is, the bound neck and the coil taps are very nice features and worth the $100.00 premium IMO.

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Just my opinion, but I don't see the point of bound necks the way it's done on low to middle range guitars these days. I could see the point when the binding covered the fret ends like Gibson etc still do, and as my early 80's Riviera and an old Antoria ES175 have, but the way it's done now with the frets over the binding just seems pointless. Other than for decoration I don't see that it serves any purpose.

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Just my opinion, but I don't see the point of bound necks the way it's done on low to middle range guitars these days. I could see the point when the binding covered the fret ends like Gibson etc still do, and as my early 80's Riviera and an old Antoria ES175 have, but the way it's done now with the frets over the binding just seems pointless. Other than for decoration I don't see that it serves any purpose.

+1 [thumbup]

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Just my opinion, but I don't see the point of bound necks the way it's done on low to middle range guitars these days. I could see the point when the binding covered the fret ends like Gibson etc still do, and as my early 80's Riviera and an old Antoria ES175 have, but the way it's done now with the frets over the binding just seems pointless. Other than for decoration I don't see that it serves any purpose.

 

A bound neck has a different feeling than an unbound one (not better or worse, just different). I've got many guitars both bound and unbound - I play them all to different degrees, but I can say unequivocally that there is a difference in feel. The biggest difference that covering the fret ends with the binding makes (besides looking different and really bad if not well done) is that if you need a fret job, it'll cost you about $100.00 more if the neck is bound this way.

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Other than for decoration I don't see that it serves any purpose.

 

You could make the same argument for block inlay vs. dot, gold vs. chrome hardware or any body color other than black.

 

Jim

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You could make the same argument for block inlay vs. dot, gold vs. chrome hardware or any body color other than black.

Like I said initially, it's just my opinion. What you say is fair comment with the exception that I thought the original idea of neck binding was to cover the end of the frets and eliminate any sharp ends. If people are happy with the way things are done now then it's their choice, their decision and their money. My own preference is for guitars with less time and money spent on decoration and more time and money put into the frets, nut, components and general setup. However, if we all liked the same thing it would be a very boring world.

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Not a huge fan of the dot, I used to have one but the look of it never did anything for me. The dot pro however looks mint, the binding and pearl inlays make it look do much better and the iced tea clour, wow, I may get myself one of these. I'm meant to be saving for a Gibson non reverse firebird but may have to dip into that fund for one of these.

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I've always been partial to Les Pauls, and considered them my #1 go-to axe. However, I've wanted an ES335 since I first played one in 1969, but could never bring myself to part with the $3000 + that they want for them. In 1993, I bought my first Epiphone Dot at a yard say for $75 w/ hardshell case. Needless to say, I didn't haggle. In 2001, a friend who owns a music store sat me down blindfolded and gave me an ES and a Dot to play. I couldn't discern the difference and promtly bought my second Dot. I have since owned two more (4 altogether). One I purchased from Musician's Friend and when I ordered it, I called the company about the difference between the Dot and the ES. As luck would have it, there was a Gibson Rep at MF that I talked to and was informed that depending on year and model they ranged from no difference at all to negligible differences, mostly in pickup quality and/or tuners, which are both easy fixes. But the stripped down versions are identical and in some cases (again, depending on year and model) EXACTLY (other than headstock) identical.

 

I consider this to be the definitive info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibson_ES-335

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Yeah, I've got two Dots...

 

I think that given the no-price-difference thing, I'd likely have ended up with the fancier models because it appears the standard Dots are kinda put into the background.

 

My guess is that to an extent a slightly upscale market was perceived for a somewhat fancier iteration of the 335 "type," perhaps due to a softening in the market for the plain Dot?

 

Regardless, for what they are and do, either must be considered a great bargain.

 

m

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I've always been partial to Les Pauls, and considered them my #1 go-to axe. However, I've wanted an ES335 since I first played one in 1969, but could never bring myself to part with the $3000 + that they want for them. In 1993, I bought my first Epiphone Dot at a yard say for $75 w/ hardshell case. Needless to say, I didn't haggle. In 2001, a friend who owns a music store sat me down blindfolded and gave me an ES and a Dot to play. I couldn't discern the difference and promtly bought my second Dot. I have since owned two more (4 altogether). One I purchased from Musician's Friend and when I ordered it, I called the company about the difference between the Dot and the ES. As luck would have it, there was a Gibson Rep at MF that I talked to and was informed that depending on year and model they ranged from no difference at all to negligible differences, mostly in pickup quality and/or tuners, which are both easy fixes. But the stripped down versions are identical and in some cases (again, depending on year and model) EXACTLY (other than headstock) identical.

 

I consider this to be the definitive info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibson_ES-335

 

So you are saying there are no differences between the Gibson and Epi models aside from tuners and pickups? What about wood and build quality? And nothing on Wikipedia is definitive.

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I dunno about "identical" with a Gibson. Should be a lot more handwork on a Gibbie that would, if anything, result in a bit more variation on the necks - as noted by HenryJ himself.

 

Somebody also didn't mention lacquer vs poly for finishes.

 

On the other hand, functionally there ain't a whole lot of difference in terms of general type of materials and design.

 

A lot of "I like this guitar" is terribly subjective, but I'll say that most folks commenting lately have written pretty highly of the Epi Dot. As if to prove the subjectivity, some figure recent Chinese the best, others some of the Korean-made versions best or...

 

My Epis ain't Gibsons, but there's doggone reliable and nice-sounding instruments with clear-sounding pups and solid-feeling switch and pots.

 

m

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The Epi 335 Pro comes with Epiphone's Alnico Classic Pro humbuckers, which are a huge step up in quality and clarity compared to the old Alnico Classics still found on the Dots. Given that the two guitars are otherwise so similar and go for the same price new, the 335 Pro seems like a no-brainer to me.

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Ian...

 

Yup... I'm guessing that were the new versions in the store/web store I would have gotten the new version 'stedda the regular Dot, but mostly as you noted for the upgrade/added electronics.

 

But... they weren't. I'm actually pretty happy with the way the Dot works. I'll add that it's a lot "cleaner" to me than other brands I tried, not to mention more comfortable.

 

m

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Ian...

 

Yup... I'm guessing that were the new versions in the store/web store I would have gotten the new version 'stedda the regular Dot, but mostly as you noted for the upgrade/added electronics.

 

But... they weren't. I'm actually pretty happy with the way the Dot works. I'll add that it's a lot "cleaner" to me than other brands I tried, not to mention more comfortable.

 

m

My reply was really just in response to the OP, not to you - I realize that the new advantages to the ES 335 Pro are a recent development, and I remember you mentioning having played a Dot for some time now.

 

All around, they're all great guitars and tremendous bargains, particularly used. I myself have an eye on an ES 339 with P90s. [thumbup]

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OK, I know this is an old thread, BUT...I have had 2 Dots, now have 2 Sheraton II's and a bought new ES 335 PRO...I strongly suggest playing one if you are thinking of buying this type of guitar. The humbuckers o the 335 PRO are about the best full size humbuckers I have ever heard on an Epiphone, and I have no issues with their standard pickups. The PRO is a real gem of a guitar, and well worth the time to try one out in person...I love my Sheratons, but the 335 PRO is more versatile, and the pickups are just great.

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