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Sophie' choice dlemma ..... HELP !!!


EuroAussie

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I'd say try it again,sometimes its not the same the second time around..if it is, and is best guitar you've ever played..you'll probably regret not doing it ..forever.

Serious debt is worth going through but maybe 2 could sell.

 

In NY where dad had his Deli on 7th/53-54 St..we were close to Carnegie Hall a block over from Broadway & back then(early 80's) there were a couple of Jazz Clubs on 54th. Not far from Brill Building,48th Street..Steinway Hall.

Professional musicians lived around there ,at the edges & came in and out at night.

From talking to them,repair guys,teachers. I summed that for the most part, they owned one "best" instrument...and a lesser spare.

When they came across a better instrument than they're main one, they usually sold the good one to help fund the better one.

The main instrument is what they played all the time.

But that one, was not, off the assembly line instrument.

 

For musics sake sticking to one would a benefited me more than chasing after guitars.

And that one best instrument is worth the price.

 

And guitarists have it cheap compared to violin players & Pianists.

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Most likely the -46 SJ has a sitka top, while the -43 J-45 has an adirondack top. I wonder if this difference in top wood can account for the difference in tone you perceived as dry/woody vs sweet.

 

My -42 J-45 is so dry and woody it sounds like walking on leaves, twigs and branches in a forrest that hasen't seen rain in decades. Just how I like it and what makes it stand out to its modern counterparts.

 

Best of luck with your choice!!

 

Lars

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OK EA..thought I might try and give you another perspective

 

cos all your getting is BUY BUY BUY..haha

 

So your in Oz..missing your guitars..you have stated the new Aaron SJ is the best in your herd..... and your missing her..yeah ? Your missing all your Gibsons..and your checking other out

 

Well ..lets step back a mo

 

What if your Aaron SJ was given a few years to mature... ok so your not going to get 70 years in your time..but... what happenes if you get this new guitar home..and well... it aint quite the 200% you thought ?

 

All i'm saying is you haven't had your new SJ for very long at all..and you seem to be a bit excited with her..and now this vintage one?.... if this vintage one is really as good as you say.. to you! then you will always regret not getting her.

 

i don't think your short of a few quid EA... so if its not being silly.. have another try and if your anything near as affected..you must.

 

Just bear in mind what missing your guitars might be doing to you too tho . :)

 

EDIT

 

and maybe the great home Adelaide air is affecting you ?..hehe.. I mean the best Martin you ever played and now the best Gibson..

 

whats going down there in OZ ;)

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The WW2 SJ definitely looks like the real thing. And gives me the opportunity to recycle a moving picture.

 

Therewego-2-1_zpse9bbcfc0.jpg

 

And the theory about the Normandy-Berlin campaign being the first time the European continent 'hosted' Gibson flattops.

 

Maybe that's the SJ right there. Case looks to be the right size, even if the body shape isn't quite right. It's a case fit for an expensive guitar, as it's arch-topped and arch-backed.

 

I'm guessing, however, that Gibson flat-tops (and archtops) made it to Europe long before this, especially with the French madness for all things American, including jazz and blues, in the years between the two world wars.

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I'm guessing, however, that Gibson flat-tops (and archtops) made it to Europe long before this, especially with the French madness for all things American, including jazz and blues, in the years between the two world wars.

 

You might be right, Nick. I know nothing apart from a vague memory of goin' through this before. Will repeat my Q from the far away thread :

 

How come then we never see a picture of ol' Gibsons here, , , f.x. in the hands of one of those French charmeurs ?

 

 

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You might be right, Nick. I know nothing apart from a vague memory of goin' through this before. Will repeat my Q from the far away thread :

 

How come then we never see a picture of ol' Gibsons here, , , f.x. in the hands of one of those French charmeurs ?

 

 

 

 

I did a search for photos of soldiers with guitars from WWII, but couldn't find any showing them playing a Gibson. This wasn't an Allied phenomenon, by the way, as there are photos of German soldiers playing guitar to each other as well.

 

After all, "Stille Nacht" was written for guitar a long, long time ago.....

 

Peace, my brother.

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I did a search for photos of soldiers with guitars from WWII, but couldn't find any showing them playing a Gibson. This wasn't an Allied phenomenon, by the way, as there are photos of German soldiers playing guitar to each other as well.

 

After all, "Stille Nacht" was written for guitar a long, long time ago.....

 

Peace, my brother.

 

Not really any Gibsons to be seen in the between-wars dance/jazz band pictures. Remember every country here had decent if not excellent brands of their own - and lots of smaller local luthiers.

But Xmas-peace will be, , , , until those Advanced Jumbo artillerymen start pounding again around New Years Eve. . . .

 

 

 

 

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The WW2 SJ definitely looks like the real thing. And gives me the opportunity to recycle a moving picture.

 

Therewego-2-1_zpse9bbcfc0.jpg

 

And the theory about the Normandy-Berlin campaign being the first time the European continent 'hosted' Gibson flattops.

 

Wow, too cool! Thanks so much for sharing this pic! This really could be my SJ (or similar Gibson). The standard case for an SJ (or J-45 or J-50) was a chipboard case (I've got the original for my other Banner SJ) and the upgrade was the same case used for 16 in archtops.

 

Again, very, very cool. Would you mind letting me know your source for this pic?

 

As for the first appearance of Gibsons in the EU, I do know that in the 1920s Gibson was exporting guitars (and marking them with a "Made in the USA" sticker). My 1929 Nick Lucas was originally shipped to Tasmania. Tom Barnwell has an AJ that was originally shipped to South Africa. There must have been European buyers.

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Again, very, very cool. Would you mind letting me know your source for this pic?

 

Thanks there JT – well, I had the photo and a few others in the archive. Took them down from the net while commenting a similar thread a year ago (maybe my own).

 

Yes, the picture is moving for several reasons - #1 is the human need for comfort, song and togetherness under every thinkable circumstance.

It talks about clever officers and indicates the line between vulnerable force and strong vulnerability – chiming chords and canon thunder.

 

I could send you the 3 I have – as I recall it, no Gibsons. (still got your mail-address from and earlier conversation)

 

 

Pardon for bending your theme EA -

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I could send you the 3 I have – as I recall it, no Gibsons. (still got your mail-address from and earlier conversation)

 

I'd love the pics. Thanks!

 

Pardon for bending your theme EA -

 

Yes, sorry for the hijack.

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I'd say try it again,sometimes its not the same the second time around..if it is, and is best guitar you've ever played..you'll probably regret not doing it ..forever.

Serious debt is worth going through but maybe 2 could sell.

 

In NY where dad had his Deli on 7th/53-54 St..we were close to Carnegie Hall a block over from Broadway & back then(early 80's) there were a couple of Jazz Clubs on 54th. Not far from Brill Building,48th Street..Steinway Hall.

Professional musicians lived around there ,at the edges & came in and out at night.

From talking to them,repair guys,teachers. I summed that for the most part, they owned one "best" instrument...and a lesser spare.

When they came across a better instrument than they're main one, they usually sold the good one to help fund the better one.

The main instrument is what they played all the time.

But that one, was not, off the assembly line instrument.

 

For musics sake sticking to one would a benefited me more than chasing after guitars.

And that one best instrument is worth the price.

 

And guitarists have it cheap compared to violin players & Pianists.

 

Such wisdom. Nearing the end of my own 'chase' and beginning to enjoy the calm of just playing a couple of solid level acoustics. At $8,000, I think the formula changes though. What begins as amazement becomes more common as your ear acclimates to hearing the same tone every day, and you could wind up not so amazed with a onesy. You'd ideally like to always have an A and a B, so your ear can post a baseline. I'd sell 'em all and spend 5G's on your headliner, and 3G's on the pinch hitter. $8,000 is a lot of cash to rest on one guitar, unless collecting is your business.

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I think about what I could buy for $8,000. Giving-up just one, maybe two or three superb instruments to obtain one (that I might change my mind about a couple months later) is not attractive to me. I've heard and read about the "holy grail" for years. I guess it depends on who you ask, but there have been times that most of my guitars have been "the" grail for a while. Then, a couple months or so later I see another great guitar. A sweet guitar is a sweet guitar, no matter what name or label we apply to it. Sounds like a cool guitar you're talking about. I hope your decision is the best one for you.........

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So .... folks, and serious here, would you give up three Gibsons to get the Holy Grail ...

Yes I would, and I have.

 

When you've got the right guitar in your hands, you know it.

 

And how often does that ever come around?

Don't let it pass you by.

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Such wisdom. Nearing the end of my own 'chase' and beginning to enjoy the calm of just playing a couple of solid level acoustics. At $8,000, I think the formula changes though. What begins as amazement becomes more common as your ear acclimates to hearing the same tone every day, and you could wind up not so amazed with a onesy. You'd ideally like to always have an A and a B, so your ear can post a baseline. I'd sell 'em all and spend 5G's on your headliner, and 3G's on the pinch hitter. $8,000 is a lot of cash to rest on one guitar, unless collecting is your business.

 

 

I used to work the night shift & confined behind a deli counter all night long, I got into conversation as often as I could.

In 1983 a girl with a violin hanging on her back comes in one night and I, keen to say that I couldnt believe that I had just bought such an expensive instrument,a Pre Cbs Fender Stratocaster 1965 for $900..

I asked about her violin. What does it cost for a good violin...?

And she says this violin cost her $10,000.

I was like W H A T ? Thats unbelievable..this is 1983.

And then she says,and I will never forget it,...that is THE LEAST one has to pay for a good violin.

 

Its not about collecting,or money,its about the instrument & the music...and these people used it for they're livelihood.

For a person who strums chords to accompany his voice its different than it is a person trying to excecute runs written by Bach.

 

And you know that one golden mother of a guitar that have in them the the capacity to let the magic in you out.

That one instrument is the bliss.

Its kind of as enough as I imagine Linda Rondstat's voice is to her when she hit those notes.

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So, EA, you have thrown the blood in the water with stories of vintage Gibsons, attracted all the sharks, started a feeding frenzy and then gone home leaving us empty-handed to think about it.

 

More blood is needed!

 

 

Buy! Buy! Buy!

 

More pics.

 

Hummingbird story. More story from Twanger Guitars and the other guitar shop you went to! Is there another nice shop?

 

 

BluesKing777.

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So, EA, you have thrown the blood in the water with stories of vintage Gibsons, attracted all the sharks, started a feeding frenzy and then gone home leaving us empty-handed to think about it.

 

More blood is needed!

 

 

Buy! Buy! Buy!

 

More pics.

 

Hummingbird story. More story from Twanger Guitars and the other guitar shop you went to! Is there another nice shop?

 

 

BluesKing777.

 

Ha, ha ... BK - actually its just these two really that are worth checking out, Derringers and Twang Central, and its even connected as the guy who runs Twang is a former Derringes employee who specialised in their vintage division, and then decided to take the unit and start up his own shop.

 

Actually Twang is utterly amazing. There was still a whole heap of guitars that Im yet to try out, including a 60's Dove, J-45 and a 69 Hummingibrd, which Im curious if it will sound like my own 69er.

 

There's also a ton of vintage Martins including 00/000, D-18's and 28's from the 50's and 60's, just didnt have the time to run through them the firs time round. Plus he also has a tasty selection of quality budget guitars like new Eastmans and Recording Kings for example.

 

He also has a ton of electrics and vintage amps including his favourite a 53' Tele that he was playing the whole time downstairs while I was going through the vintage Gibbys upstairs.

 

Apparently he gets musos from around Australia coming to buy vintage gear from his shop (Jim Moginie from the Oils bought a vintage $40K amp from him last week apparently) and he has a strong opinion on Jacksons guitars, reckons the whole place was full of fraud and dodgy as hell, as it finally turned out to be.

 

Really worth a trip to come down to Adelaide for a weekend and visit both shops, as they both offer a different experience with Derringers focusing on high quality new guitars while Twang has some of the best of the vintage vault.

 

Anyway, Im away by the Murray river after xmas so shold be back there again around 30th ..... stay tuned folks ...

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Ha, ha ... BK - actually its just these two really that are worth checking out, Derringers and Twang Central, and its even connected as the guy who runs Twang is a former Derringes employee who specialised in their vintage division, and then decided to take the unit and start up his own shop.

 

Actually Twang is utterly amazing. There was still a whole heap of guitars that Im yet to try out, including a 60's Dove, J-45 and a 69 Hummingibrd, which Im curious if it will sound like my own 69er.

 

There's also a ton of vintage Martins including 00/000, D-18's and 28's from the 50's and 60's, just didnt have the time to run through them the firs time round. Plus he also has a tasty selection of quality budget guitars like new Eastmans and Recording Kings for example.

 

He also has a ton of electrics and vintage amps including his favourite a 53' Tele that he was playing the whole time downstairs while I was going through the vintage Gibbys upstairs.

 

Apparently he gets musos from around Australia coming to buy vintage gear from his shop (Jim Moginie from the Oils bought a vintage $40K amp from him last week apparently) and he has a strong opinion on Jacksons guitars, reckons the whole place was full of fraud and dodgy as hell, as it finally turned out to be.

 

Really worth a trip to come down to Adelaide for a weekend and visit both shops, as they both offer a different experience with Derringers focusing on high quality new guitars while Twang has some of the best of the vintage vault.

 

Anyway, Im away by the Murray river after xmas so shold be back there again around 30th ..... stay tuned folks ...

 

 

 

Sounds very interesting, but deadly, EA!

 

 

We don't have anything that I know of like that in Victoria.

 

We have a good acoustic guitar shop called of course, The Acoustic Centre but they have the odd vintage Gibson/Martin advertised, though I have turned up in a slight lather to try one that was on their website to find not a trace at the physical shop of anything remotely vintage, let alone the vintage Gibson in question, so until they carry Gibson Masterbuilt strings I won't be back!

 

Enjoy the MurrayRiver...

 

BluesKing777.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ha, ha ... BK - actually its just these two really that are worth checking out, Derringers and Twang Central, and its even connected as the guy who runs Twang is a former Derringes employee who specialised in their vintage division, and then decided to take the unit and start up his own shop.

 

Actually Twang is utterly amazing. There was still a whole heap of guitars that Im yet to try out, including a 60's Dove, J-45 and a 69 Hummingibrd, which Im curious if it will sound like my own 69er.

 

There's also a ton of vintage Martins including 00/000, D-18's and 28's from the 50's and 60's, just didnt have the time to run through them the firs time round. Plus he also has a tasty selection of quality budget guitars like new Eastmans and Recording Kings for example.

 

He also has a ton of electrics and vintage amps including his favourite a 53' Tele that he was playing the whole time downstairs while I was going through the vintage Gibbys upstairs.

 

Apparently he gets musos from around Australia coming to buy vintage gear from his shop (Jim Moginie from the Oils bought a vintage $40K amp from him last week apparently) and he has a strong opinion on Jacksons guitars, reckons the whole place was full of fraud and dodgy as hell, as it finally turned out to be.

 

Really worth a trip to come down to Adelaide for a weekend and visit both shops, as they both offer a different experience with Derringers focusing on high quality new guitars while Twang has some of the best of the vintage vault.

 

Anyway, Im away by the Murray river after xmas so shold be back there again around 30th ..... stay tuned folks ...

 

So what is the latest, EA?

 

We have been waiting for the new clip of the 52 SJ you were hot for in Adelaide........

 

Gone cold on it?

 

Or are you still skiing down the Murray River?

 

And the review of the Hummingbird from Twangers you promised......

 

Keep up!

 

 

 

BluesKing777.

 

(I sent the link to the Hummer to a friend in SA, and he may be sweating a Gassy fever right now....)

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