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Please Help!


Hans Solberg

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Hi - Im trying to put new strings on my SG, But i need to know a few things first. Because i've never replaced strings on this guitar before, I failed to first examine how the bridge was setup, And made the mistake of screwing with the tailpiece's height and also with the bridge. Is there a reccomendation of how high these things need to be from the body? my attempts at setting things up saw the string touching the bridge pickup. I heard there are some good books available that teach you from the ground up on how to correctly "setup" an electric guitar that suits your tastes, and truly do plan on getting into this someday, but for now, i just want my sg back, Nothing fancy, just need some tips on how to string up as correctly as possible. Thank you.

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Guest alanhindle

Here are a few links to ponder over:

http://mysite.verizon.net/jazz.guitar/guitarsetup.htm

http://www.stewmac.com/freeinfo/String_action_and_setup/i-3910.html

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=Oclc4MHWbzw&feature=user

 

NB. I wouldn't recommending messing with the truss rod unless you know exactly what you are doing (i.e. very experienced) and have the correct tools.

 

Overall the best advice would probably be to get your guitar set up by a tech

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Why not just lower the bridge pickup? The you can raise or lower the bridge as to your preference of action. When you get it to where you want it, you can adjust the pickup accordingly. I prefer my bridge pickup on my 2 pickup guitars ('61 SG & Custom shop Tele) to be closer to the strings, to balance out the output from the front pickup. The height of the stopbar is not too critical to anything. Some say the closer it is, the more sustain, but I've found zero difference in this area. You don't want it TOO low,as a greater breakover angle over the bridge could make for more broken strings. Mine is about 1/2" from the body. Also,as per previous advice, unless you know what you're doing, do not, I repeat,DO NOT mess with the truss rod (especially on a Gibson). Put on the guage strings you want, then take it to an experienced guitar tech, and tell him you want the rod adjusted so the neck is straight. Some will say that you should have some relief,I disagree! Only when the neck is perfectly straight can you adjust your action to where you want it (providing your frets are all level,which they should be on an instrument of the SG's caliber). Keep in mind that if you change guage's,your neck adjustment can change,too. Good luck

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