Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Model/Serial numbers question


Sara

Recommended Posts

I recently purchased a Custom shop Les Paul, and have a few questions to ask regarding serial and model numbers, as this is the first Les Paul, or Gibson guitar of any description that I've ever owned. Here is a pic of the type of Les Paul I have:

 

o_wwycXCBA0A8Utfq.jpg

 

First of all, what is the difference (or is there a difference?) between the serial and the model number? Secondly, if there is a difference, where do I find the model number for my guitar? There is a number on the back of the headstock, which I'm guessing is the serial number. This same number is on the back of the Gold warranty card that came with the guitar, and is also on the certificate of authenticity card. Strangely, on the back of the Gold warranty card, where it's supposed to have the model number, all that's written in that space is "LP Custom". So, if the model number is different to the serial number, and means something different, where do I find it? I'm asking this, as I wish to descipher either or both of these numbers to get precise info about my guitar, when it was made, and it's specifications.

 

Thanks in advance for any help recieved! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Firstly, hi there and welcome to the Forum.

 

The Serial Number is the ten(?)-digit number unique to your actual instrument. Through it the Gibson Customer Service could tell you - or any future prospective buyer - what, exactly, the guitar is and where and when it was built.

Give Gibson Customer Services a call if you want to know this info.

 

The Model Number is a code used by Gibson which contains information about the specification of your instrument type, such as (and I'm making this up but you will get the idea); 'LPCUSAWGH'

This could be translated as; "Les Paul CUStom Antique White Gold Hardware".

 

Hope this helps slightly.

 

P.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Sara!

 

Pippy said it right - as always.

 

I just want to add: You'll find the model number on the cardboard box the guitar came packed in (white sticker on the top with Gibson logo). It's also hand-written on the QC inspection card.

 

Cheers... Bence

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Pippy & btoth76. :) Thank you both for the quick replies!

 

The serial number for my guitar starts with 2 letters (CS) followed by 6 digits. Btoth76, I had a look at the white Gibson sticker on top of the cardboard box that the guitar was packed in, and whilst there's nothing specifically saying that this is the model number, I've found what I'm presuming is the model number. Here it is: LPC-AWGH1. Do you think this is the model number?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... I've found what I'm presuming is the model number. Here it is: LPC-AWGH1. Do you think this is the model number?

That's it.

 

If you compare the actual number with my guess from earlier on yours reads;

Les Paul Custom - Antique White Gold Hardware 1.

 

The '1' indicates it's not a factory 'second'.

Sometimes in the past Gibson sold instruments which might have been perfect structurally but (usually) had a minor cosmetic flaw.

These 'seconds' had a '2' stamped into the rear of the peghead and were sold off at a reduced price.

 

P.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks a lot for the info guys, I really appreciate it! I understand much better about the serial/model numbers now. :)

 

So I'm taking it that it's the serial number that will give me more specific info about the guitar, like when it was made? How do I decipher the serial number to get those details?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unlike regular USA production the CS doesn't indicate date of manufacture in the serial number.

 

Here is the info on CS serial numbers straight from the main Gibson site;

 

"Custom Shop regular production models

CSYRRRR

CS stands for "Custom Shop"

Y indicates the production year

RRRR indicates the guitar's place in the sequence of production

 

Example: CS10845 is the 845th reg. production CS model produced in 2001."

 

In this case you would need to contact Gibson Customer Services directly.

 

1-800-4GIBSON (1-800-444-2766)

 

Good luck!

 

P.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

.

Welcome.

 

Congrats on a beautiful LPC.

 

Just a couple of things to add -

 

In the model number, I believe Gibson is using the name Arctic White for the bright white finish.

 

About the white finish: In case you haven't previously owned a white guitar finished in nitrocellulose lacquer - the finish is susceptible to dyes leaching through the nitro and staining the finish color and binding. Particularly red and blue dyes, but others as well. The effect can be accelerated by dampness/sweat. The most likely spots for this to occur is the back of the guitar, the lower bout where your forearm rubs (with a log sleeve shirt), and on the treble side edge of the body where it would rest on your knee if you play sitting down.

 

 

.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

.

Welcome.

 

Congrats on a beautiful LPC.

 

Just a couple of things to add -

 

In the model number, I believe Gibson is using the name Arctic White for the bright white finish.

 

About the white finish: In case you haven't previously owned a white guitar finished in nitrocellulose lacquer - the finish is susceptible to dyes leaching through the nitro and staining the finish color and binding. Particularly red and blue dyes, but others as well. The effect can be accelerated by dampness/sweat. The most likely spots for this to occur is the back of the guitar, the lower bout where your forearm rubs (with a log sleeve shirt), and on the treble side edge of the body where it would rest on your knee if you play sitting down.

 

 

.

 

Thanks. :)

 

The exact serial number for my guitar is: CS 203399

 

Hmm... the dyes thing sounds a bit worrying. Is there a way of preventing this, and if any dye does leach through to the finish, is there any way of getting rid of it? Thank you for this info, I was unaware of that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

.

Just being aware is a big part of avoiding trouble. Keep the guitar waxed. Avoid playing the guitar while wearing new unwashed clothing. Be mindful of that especially if you're going to play long/hard enough to sweat. Some clothing tags warn to wash darkly dyed material one or two times before washing with other clothes. That's the care to take - if the color doesn't run in the wash, you should be okay. Wipe the guitar down when done playing and look for any signs of trouble. If caught quickly, a cleaner like Virtuoso cleaner or a light polishing/rubbing compound can rub the stain out. Unfortunately, if you end up with a stain you hadn't noticed and it's set a couple of days or more, it can difficult/impossible to remove. Sounds like a headache, but if you keep in mind what to watch out for, you're very likely not to have trouble.

 

 

 

 

 

@Pippy - You know how Gibson is: two years ago or so they were calling it Alpine White. . B)

 

 

.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

.@Pippy - You know how Gibson is: two years ago or so they were calling it Alpine White. . B)

 

I must confess I thought it was far to 'bright' for Antique White and thought it might be either Arctic or Alpine but as 'Antique' is all the white the CS offers at the moment (AFAIK) I thought that it could only be that. Or else my screen needed re-calibration......lol!

 

[thumbup]

 

P.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just being aware is a big part of avoiding trouble. Keep the guitar waxed. Avoid playing the guitar while wearing new unwashed clothing. Be mindful of that especially if you're going to play long/hard enough to sweat. Some clothing tags warn to wash darkly dyed material one or two times before washing with other clothes. That's the care to take - if the color doesn't run in the wash, you should be okay. Wipe the guitar down when done playing and look for any signs of trouble. If caught quickly, a cleaner like Virtuoso cleaner or a light polishing/rubbing compound can rub the stain out. Unfortunately, if you end up with a stain you hadn't noticed and it's set a couple of days or more, it can difficult/impossible to remove. Sounds like a headache, but if you keep in mind what to watch out for, you're very likely not to have trouble.

 

Having closely inspected the back of my guitar, I have noticed a couple of faint black streaks on the finish. I am now assuming that this happened as a result of wearing a fairly new black top (though it has been washed a couple of times) whilst playing the guitar for hours and perspiring. The guitar was supposed to come with a Gibson guitar care kit, but it did not. So I had nothing to try and removed the stains with when I spotted them, so now I'm very likely just going to have to live with them being there. I'm now regretting not joining these forums BEFORE I got the guitar, as I could have taken measures to prevent the staining with the knowledge you have just given me... :( Ah well, at least now I know about this, I can prevent any further staining to the guitar. Thanx again for the info, it's really appreciated. :)

 

Perhaps I should have plumped for one of the darker finishes of the guitar instead... lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello!

 

If this has been covered, then sorry for repeating it...anyways it can't be said enough times:

 

1.) Nitrocellulose finish is porous and never cures completely.

2.) Like a sponge, sucks in dyes from clothes and guitarstands.

 

So, use Virtuoso Polish (specially designed compound for nitro finished instruments), or Gibson Luthier's Choice to keep the finish sealed. Use it - let's say - in every 3 months.

 

Use stands that are officially guaranteed to be nitro-safe by the manufacturer.

 

Only clean the instrument with clean, 100% pure cotton rags. Don't touch it with anything else. Especially important to avoid rubbing the headstock holly veener with anything. That's the spot were all scratches are most visible - if any.

 

Avoid wearing clothes that are not made of cotton and/or heavily coloured when playing. Watch out for belt buckles and rivets of jeans - these can leave ugly scratches on the back of the guitar.

 

Wipe the instrument clean after each use and keep it in the hardcase. (Hardcase should be always laid down. If it falls from vertical position, it might result a neck break.)

 

Keep the instrument in an environment with constant humidity (optimal: 50-55%) and temperature (optimal: 20-25 Celsius degrees).

 

Remember white finishes are the most fragile! Enjoy Your new Gibson with good health! If You treat Her right it will stay like new forever.

 

Cheers...Bence

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...