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jcmartinez

switched adjust. bridge to TUSQ

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had to do some minimal filing of the graphtech tusq item, which is ready-made for the gibson adjustable bridges, to get it to fit well.

but it must be shorter in height than the wood one, because when screwed all the way in (as the wooden one was) all the strings were buzzing after the 9th fret or so.

 

unscrewed each pin equally until no more buzzing.

 

i think it sounds great, but i also put on brand new strings so who knows???

 

the question- for those who know- is:

is the whole point of the bridge to transmit vibration to the body, and therefore shouldn't the entire flat 'bottom' of the bridge be pressed against the top of the body guitar?

 

if the screws are essentially suspending the bridge in the air, then how can it matter what material the bridge is made of...

seems like it wouldn't make much of a difference. at least not a significant one...

 

weird...

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I'm not great at moving content around the site but I think I linkd you to a discussion of this. You should be able to see an explanation of what I did re: top-to- saddle response here. What model are you discussing?

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I'm not great at moving content around the site but I think I linkd you to a discussion of this. You should be able to see an explanation of what I did re: top-to- saddle response here. What model are you discussing?

 

 

1968 j50

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had to do some minimal filing of the graphtech tusq item, which is ready-made for the gibson adjustable bridges, to get it to fit well.

but it must be shorter in height than the wood one, because when screwed all the way in (as the wooden one was) all the strings were buzzing after the 9th fret or so.

 

unscrewed each pin equally until no more buzzing.

 

i think it sounds great, but i also put on brand new strings so who knows???

 

the question- for those who know- is:

is the whole point of the bridge to transmit vibration to the body, and therefore shouldn't the entire flat 'bottom' of the bridge be pressed against the top of the body guitar?

 

if the screws are essentially suspending the bridge in the air, then how can it matter what material the bridge is made of...

seems like it wouldn't make much of a difference. at least not a significant one...

 

weird...

 

You're actually referring to the saddle, not the bridge. The bridge is against the body. The saddle can be raised or lowered with the emtire mechanism itself likel transmitting the sound in combination with the saddle, the adjustable holder and screws, and the bridge. The adjustable saddle bridge has been controversial since its inception for the reason you mentioned. Likely, your former wooden saddle also sat in the mechanism slightly above the body if it was raised at all. The saddle material still makes a difference even if its raised in the bridge mechanism. Keep in mind on vintage non-electric archtops...they all had adjustable bridges. Their materials made a difference too although the materials were potentially different woods, creating different sounds. A tusq saddle in an adjustable bridge will sound different than a wooden one or a ceramic one. Likewise, a bone saddle will also sound different.

 

Some like the sound of the adjusable bridge, some don't. The tusq and bone saddle inserts in the adjustable bridge seem to have found favor to many than the former wooden or ceramic saddles used. It used to be those who didn't like the adjustable bridge sound had the bridge replaced with a stable bridge. Nowadays, most leave the adjustable mechanism and substitute a tusq or ceramic replacement saddle to improve the sound while retaining the cool original mechanism. The replacement saddles for the adjustable bridges have also enabled Gibson to reissue some vintage models with the original adjustable bridge mechanism (with the tusq replacement saddle rather than the original ceramic or wooden saddles.) Some owners then have found they prefer a third party bone saddle replacement.

 

I have a 1964 Custom Shop J-45 Reissue with an adjustable bridge. For a few years I kept the reissue tusq saddle in it and liked it, but I also bought a bone replacement saddle. Recently, I put it in...and think I'll now keep the bone replacement in it. After liking the tusq one, I find i like the bone one even better. But, can't downrap the tusq one.

 

I have numerous guitars, so to me having the adjustable saddle bridge sound and feel on the 64 Reissue is something unique that I like.

 

QM aka Jazzman Jeff

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Been looking forward to hear from you as this is a main-topic in my world and not talked about in detail too often.

Yes, the theory is that mass-contact is the clue. The logic is obvious – no gabs and spaces mean more direct vibration from component to component.

All very good, but this is a musical instrument and you will find examples where a little 'room' between saddle and bridge-bottom might work fine (as another adjuster, f.x. a way to hold back).

Remember power and volume ain't god – it's a bit immature to think like that and instead you have to find the exact right recipe for your needs.

Recall saying this when the topic was first up in your regi and I'll repeat : It is hyper interesting experimental territory – and what you are looking for is a deeper point in yourself ;-)

 

Now wait for the strings to fade and listen/learn - then next step is another material. You can use shims or sand as you like.

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thanks, guys.

yeah, saddle not bridge. my bad. it may be that the old wooden had a gap, but the screws were definitely all the way in, now they're significantly out. i don't want them to be far enough out that there's increased lever arm thus trying to bend the screws or otherwise put tension that this old girl shouldn't otherwise be having to deal with...

that's my only concern.

 

i can see that they're farther out, but the tusq (i've had it in with the new strings for about 2 weeks now) sounds really nice. i don't know how much is placebo effect or real, but i'm digging it...

will probably also buy the bone to see if i find that place 'deeper w/in myself'

 

thanks again.

 

Em7, ever seen 'baraka' or 'samsara?'

 

check out trailers online. those can take you to some pretty amazing depths...

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Em7, ever seen 'baraka' or 'samsara?'

check out trailers online. those can take you to some pretty amazing depths...

No, it's been a looong time since I put my nose in those kinds of corners, but you'll never know. First there is a mountain then there is no mountain then there is. . . .

The guy below seems to have found something important in his rosewood saddled '64 Bird.

 

Been wanting to bring the clip for quite some time, here came the opportunity.

 

Admire this example of man'n'instrument a lot -

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZ27Yv5CWBc

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How about this strategy to try. Take out the adjustment screws and lift your saddle a little bit by putting a thin hardwood shim underneath it. Ebony is usually recommended for this. Bob Colosi sells ebony shims to use with bone saddles and I've used them with good results.

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all the strings were buzzing after the 9th fret or so.

 

you may want to also check the bow of you neck.

If you do all the adjustment with the saddle you may wind up with a higher action than you're after.

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How about this strategy to try. Take out the adjustment screws and lift your saddle a little bit by putting a thin hardwood shim underneath it. Ebony is usually recommended for this. Bob Colosi sells ebony shims to use with bone saddles and I've used them with good results.

 

i thought about this concept, but how would i ever get it out??? plus, the tusq model that i purchased is pre-shaped with slots for the screws, so it wouldn't be snug (side to side) without them. however, if i move beyond the pre-shaped tusq or bone saddles, i'll consider this.

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you may want to also check the bow of you neck.

If you do all the adjustment with the saddle you may wind up with a higher action than you're after.

 

the luthier i took it to before i ordered the tusq said everything was bone straight and looking great. he said he couldn't find anything even to tweak(!)

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