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Friends ,

 

after a long long time I got an email from Fuller's that the Century Of Progress came in .

he also said they are storing all the guitars in a "special room" .

notice the black case with black lining :

 

DSC_0055_zps7b1a8d7d.jpg

 

DSC_0056_zpse5419fa9.jpg

 

DSC_0063_zps9d59f764.jpg

 

DSC_0061_zps86e9a64a.jpg

 

 

DSC_0058_zpsac1ce85e.jpg

 

DSC_0057_zpsdd2664cf.jpg

 

DSC_0060_zps22b5e5b8.jpg

 

I love the way it looks ... this guitar took a very long time to make so it's really an old order just coming in .

 

 

 

JC

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I can't demo it now . they have been keeping all these gutiars for me at Fuller's .

I haven't lived in the US for almost 15 years . but that's about to change =) ... I'm on the verge of moving back =D

here is a demo of the guitar through Music Villa's ACOUSTIC LETTER :

 

 

 

 

thanks for the kind comments =) . love flamed maple =D

 

 

 

 

 

JC

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Congrats....I've played an original COP guitar on which your is based. I actually liked the feel of that inlaid neck, since I slide a lot of notes and chords....BUT I must say the original one I played wasn't even close to how beautiful your guitar is.....without a doubt, stunning!

OWF ,

 

 

did you play Elvis' actual COP or just a vintage COP ?

this one is a little extra special I think ... Jeremy said it's louder than he remembers the originals and he says the boys in Montana got the inlay pattern perfect =D

 

 

 

 

 

JC

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Very nice, Juan Carlos -- the Centurys are an acquired taste for some folks, and an immediate one for others. So long as they sound good, I like 'em!

 

Local energizer bunny-***-guitar geek John Thomas has one of the originals, and it's a real nice one. (Too bad he plays it upside-down!)

 

Fred

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Very nice, Juan Carlos -- the Centurys are an acquired taste for some folks, and an immediate one for others. So long as they sound good, I like 'em!

 

Local energizer bunny-***-guitar geek John Thomas has one of the originals, and it's a real nice one. (Too bad he plays it upside-down!)

 

Fred

 

Fred ,

 

for me it's the really nice flamed maple on these ... the MOT is a really great bonus =D .

 

 

 

JC

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It was original from the 30's I believe......I think you will really like the neck feel....I hope the sound matches the beauty!!!

 

OWF ,

 

 

did you play Elvis' actual COP or just a vintage COP ?

this one is a little extra special I think ... Jeremy said it's louder than he remembers the originals and he says the boys in Montana got the inlay pattern perfect =D

 

 

 

 

 

JC

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When on a trip to visit family out in New Hampshire my wife pointed out a guitar store as we were driving down the street. I can't even recall which town we were passing through at the time as this trip took place over 14 years ago. Anyway, I pulled in and we took a look around the store. They actually had quite a few neat vintage guitars, but the standout for me was an original COP from the 30s — it was a fantastic guitar. Wonderful condition, played great, sounded great. They wanted something like $2K for it at the time. It was oh so tempting, but I ended up leaving the shop without the little COP.

 

As has already been said, mother of toilet seat is a bit of an acquired taste, especially for a "bling averse" person such as myself. Had it not been for the excess of the pearl-like surface, I would have found a way to get the guitar back to Texas where we lived at the time. Still, even after all of these years I haven't forgotten about that great little guitar and do think about it from time to time, especially when I see a thread such as this!

 

I hope you enjoy your new COP to the fullest!

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When on a trip to visit family out in New Hampshire my wife pointed out a guitar store as we were driving down the street. I can't even recall which town we were passing through at the time as this trip took place over 14 years ago. Anyway, I pulled in and we took a look around the store. They actually had quite a few neat vintage guitars, but the standout for me was an original COP from the 30s — it was a fantastic guitar. Wonderful condition, played great, sounded great. They wanted something like $2K for it at the time. It was oh so tempting, but I ended up leaving the shop without the little COP.

 

As has already been said, mother of toilet seat is a bit of an acquired taste, especially for a "bling averse" person such as myself. Had it not been for the excess of the pearl-like surface, I would have found a way to get the guitar back to Texas where we lived at the time. Still, even after all of these years I haven't forgotten about that great little guitar and do think about it from time to time, especially when I see a thread such as this!

 

I hope you enjoy your new COP to the fullest!

Guth ,

 

nice story . I really enjoyed it ... but not the outcome I expected

 

did you ever go back to the guitar shop ?

 

 

 

 

JC

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Cool! I have never had a chance to play one of the new ones. It would be very interesting to see how they sound. They don't show up too often in the genres where we hang out.

 

 

There was a time when they were my favorite guitars for the gospel-ragtime style I try to use sometime. I really like the way they sound played solo -- they eventually lost out to wartime mahogany Js because of the hogs' better performance in more complex string band environments.

 

Here are our old ones.

 

IMG_5366_zps609ab5f9.jpg

 

 

The one on the right is a 1937. The one on the left appears to be older, but we don't know for sure. As a 12 fret, it either has to be a Hawaiian conversion of an original early 12-fret version. I am now quite sure it is a conversion.

 

Well congratulation -- they are indeed special.

 

Best,

 

-Tom

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Cool! I have never had a chance to play one of the new ones. It would be very interesting to see how they sound. They don't show up too often in the genres where we hang out.

 

 

There was a time when they were my favorite guitars for the gospel-ragtime style I try to use sometime. I really like the way they sound played solo -- they eventually lost out to wartime mahogany Js because of the hogs' better performance in more complex string band environments.

 

Here are our old ones.

 

IMG_5366_zps609ab5f9.jpg

 

 

The one on the right is a 1937. The one on the left appears to be older, but we don't know for sure. As a 12 fret, it either has to be a Hawaiian conversion of an original early 12-fret version. I am now quite sure it is a conversion.

 

Well congratulation -- they are indeed special.

 

Best,

 

-Tom

 

Tom ,

 

have you had them for a long time ? or are they a recent aquisition ?

 

is there a special shop you like to visit ?

 

 

 

I'm always checking online to find lefty gems but most of the time they are overpriced .

 

 

 

God Bless

 

 

 

 

 

 

JC

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Tom ,

 

have you had them for a long time ? or are they a recent aquisition ?

 

is there a special shop you like to visit ?

 

 

 

I'm always checking online to find lefty gems but most of the time they are overpriced .

 

Hi JC,

 

We have had these quite a while -- both bought a bit less than 20 years ago. At that time, the traditional bluegrass crowd we were hanging out with were were crazy about certain vintage instruments -- mostly old Martin dreads. There was certainly no interest in any Gibson guitars (lots of interest in Gibson banjos and mandolins) except perhaps the old AJs. Gary Burnett was very much a member of the bluegrass community, and he was the one who "discovered" the AJ as a bluegrass instruments. Certainly small Gibsons, and certain MOTS Gibsons, were of no real interest.

 

Of course we were very interested in the Martin dreads too -- but we were considered sort of weird, or maybe crafty, for picking up the smaller instruments. I am the one who talked both the UMGF and the banjo hangout to start a vintage and collectors subforums -- looking for people with broader interest.

 

What I found was an entirely different guitar culture.

 

I bought the 12-fret from Gary Burnett and I bought the other guitar from a now defunct music store that belonged to vintage instrument collector/investor Goeff Hohwald. Goeff is as hard core as they come -- prewar Martin dreads and original flatheads are about it for him. Most recently he acquired Wade Maynard's original flathead RB-Granada. He is a pretty good friend and we play music with him now and then. When he has visited me at home, he always suggests that I get rid of all the junk so I can have more "real" instruments.

 

Most of our small 30s Gibsons we got more than 15-20 years ago. Most of the banners were more than 10 years ago. The large Js from the 30s are more recent -- but not super recent. 3-8 years ago.

 

Mostly now we buy from individuals of one sort and another.

 

Officially we are no longer buying, but that really hasn't worked perfectly.

 

Best,

 

-Tom

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