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Last birthday I went for a AKG414XLS Microphone with a Phantom Power thing,one year to the day I have not used it yet...and no such similar pleasure this year.

 

What is an equal to this mic or better..portable maybe.. type of recorder to match it with ?

I have a Nakamichi MR-1 Pro Cassette Recorder which I plan on using so far..

 

Thanks

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Last birthday I went for a AKG414XLS Microphone with a Phantom Power thing,one year to the day I have not used it yet...and no such similar pleasure this year.

 

What is an equal to this mic or better..portable maybe.. type of recorder to match it with ?

I have a Nakamichi MR-1 Pro Cassette Recorder which I plan on using so far..

 

Thanks

 

The AKG414 is a condenser microphone with selectable pickup patterns. Condensers require power to operate. You have to supply it power from a phantom power supply which goes to the mic through the XLR connection. Usually, you would use this mic with a mixer that has a phantom power switch. Unless your Nakamichi has phantom power and a balanaced XLR mic input, you will not be able to use this mic with it.

 

If you want portable recording with excellent mic pickup, I'd suggest a field recorder like the Zoom H1 or H2 or the Tascam DR07 MkII. Of course, those record to digital media and are for use with a computer (not cassettes).

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The AKG414 is a condenser microphone with selectable pickup patterns. Condensers require power to operate. You have to supply it power from a phantom power supply which goes to the mic through the XLR connection. Usually, you would use this mic with a mixer that has a phantom power switch. Unless your Nakamichi has phantom power and a balanaced XLR mic input, you will not be able to use this mic with it.

 

If you want portable recording with excellent mic pickup, I'd suggest a field recorder like the Zoom H1 or H2 or the Tascam DR07 MkII. Of course, those record to digital media and are for use with a computer (not cassettes).

 

The Nakamich Cassette Recorder MR1 Professional has either 1/4" or XLR connections(its in a box can't see right now)...

When I bought the AKG 414 I got a Presonus Mic PreAmp as well...want to put that mic to use.

I'd like a unit with no mic in it.. but equal or as good as this 414.

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Im not sure what you are asking Mersey ?

 

You want a different mic than the AKG414...but same quaility...?

 

Why?... what is it you want to do...is it just tp record you and your guitar?

 

The 414 is a proffesional mic..with switchable polar patterns...this means it can be used in many different recording situations... to use it omni directioanl..for example.. if you don't understand polar patterns and there uses..this mic is not really for you.

 

The reason almost every studio in the world has these mics..is because they are good mics..but also have 6 I think switchable polar ( where they will caputure the sound from ) patterns.. so its like having 6 mics in one..sort of.

 

I have stated before...unless you are working proffesionally... you do not need to be spending $1000 odd dollars on a mic

 

Here is an article from Sound On sound that will help

 

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/Jul03/articles/firstmic.asp

 

 

Personaly..i would go with one of the digital..portable recorders..like the Zoom mentioned.. Just listen to the clips here to see what great pieces of kit these are.

 

And learn how to put it on you computer..many easy programmes to do this..and edit the sound files ect... While your tape machine has its uses.. really digital and computers are the way to go Mersey.. for one thing..saves a load of monwy on tape.

 

PM me if you want to know any more.

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Recording Enthusiast - Yes and No!

 

I was hooked after I bought a reel-to-reel back in the dark ages. The pawn shop got that. I have a room full of the 'latest' junk as it came out over the years, but it is the mics and preamps that are the most important!

 

 

 

The Zoom H2 and friends are amazing - nice stereo image, pretty good eq 'as-is' - record the guitar and vocal, load to computer, chop off the beginning thunks, add a millimetre of room reverb and run to a Web friendly format for spreading and sharing - incredibly easy really and the sound quality is way, way better than the normal web stuff, perhaps because of the stereo.....? I just lean mine on my music stand next to the chord/lyrics, but a 'proper setup' on a mic stand would be better - I found it highlights my breathing a bit too much, but I get a good balance between vocal and guitar so I just keep doing that...

 

This track I recorded with my Zoom H2 before I even realised I was recording......

 

https://soundcloud.com/bluesking777/louise14b

 

 

Stepping up to higher quality mics and then we need higher quality everything! Pre-amps, interfaces, effects, software, playback, sound proofing and separate room for equipment with its noise and separate room for playing.....and then somebody who knows what they are doing or it can be a real mess.

 

Depends what you are doing - if it just sound sample/tunes for the Forum or friends, gadgets like the Zoom are the go. If you want Pro recording, either start buying and learning pro equipment or go to a proper studio.

 

 

BluesKing777.

 

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Thanks guys...Ive been misunderstood.

 

I have the 414 unused so far, and its required mic Presonus Preamp with Phantom power.

 

What is equal to this microphones quality, in a recorder, in a compact package.. No built in mics..?

 

 

Id like to buy (eventually) a portable recording unit that is really good..and if I can one day get one of those great Tube mics someplace...sometime..(Manley/C12/Telefunken) the recorder should be good enough that it will not be wasted.

I realize I may be doing old world thinking in a world where that no longer exists.

 

P.S. How do you PM someone?

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I have tried the pro tools route with $1000 + preamps and mics etc. I would highly suggest that anyone looking to record basic stuff keep it as simple as possible. The high dollar stuff requires even higher dollar stuff to go into even higher dollar stuff and then if you do not know how to use it right it doesnt matter what you are using to begin with. I sold off everything I had and am now just using an Apogee Jam and Apogee mic into my I pad. Simple and if the mic is placed properly it sounds quite nice. It can be used with Garage band or any othe program on mac or ipad. The more complicated it gets the less you actually record.

Just my 2 cents.

Jeremy

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I don't know if computers are a route you want to go down, but my own portable setup is to use a Focusrite audio interface, racked and in a flightcase, and my laptop as the recording device. With an ADAT extention to the Focusrite, I have 16 channel in and out, two channels of Focusrite Liquid Channel preamps, and an extremely powerful recording base. Throw in a bag full of mics and bits and pieces and it's pretty much a recording studio that fits on the car passenger seat.

 

I'm not suggesting you go quite down this route if you're just recording acoustic guitar, voice etc, but a laptop and an audio interface with a decent preamp and phantom power might be a good alternative. If you have the Presonus for phantom power, something like the Apogee Duet would give you proper pro quality AD conversion for not too much money.

 

If we're sticking with hardware recorders, some of the Boss and Tascam multitracks will give you phantom power inputs and claim CD quality recording - although you get a lot of unneccessary bells and whistles and I don't think the actual AD converters are as good as a decent audio interface. Even with the Zoom units mentioned, I think they have a line in so you can record with the 414 as well as the top mounted mics.

 

Lastly, some people still swear by products such as the Alesis Masterlink or HS24 as a great quality hard disk digital recording device - there's less and less demand for this sort of product as so many people just use their computers, but they do have good quality componants and AD conversion. There's also a company called Superscope who make a high quality recorder / CD writer marketed at music teachers that is a slightly different take on a similar platform.

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If anyone else adds to this I appreciate it.

Many excellent suggestions..thanks so much..I see there are different categories of option.

 

JJ the break down of each has me looking forwards to lookin into these (though the meaning of things like Audio Interface..AD Converter..Hard disk recording...ADAT...hardware recorders...throw me for a loop and are not that clear, but I have some idea)

 

I am a person from 1971...to me...instead of the digital recording (tick tick tick) direction everything went to...

I would have suggested the Super High Quality Metal Recording Tape available back then, in 3/4 or 1 inch wide, be put into a vibration free/dust resistant "Cassette" for recording music.

An improvement over open reels of tape..

 

But recording, kind of, direct on to a cd ..or into some "bank" which can then be written on to a cd sounds cool.

I have an Apple computer but to me connections look too flimsey & the tv sized too inconvienant to record move around and record on to. But it can maybe be used to record the finished disks(cds)..?

 

Great info thanks.

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Mersey,

 

to send a pm..click on my name..it will take you to a differnt screen where you will see an option to message me.

 

Jayy knows his stuff.. I think he has spent many years doing recording..I was..and would try and keep it simple for you.. :)

 

Put shortly...just get a Zoom mate :)...your apple computer ( is it a laptop?) is the industry standards for working with music and media.

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Back a while, we had a thread on portable digital recorders, and we arrived at the conclusion that we didn't have a conclusion!

 

A lot of people like the budget Zoom model, which I received as a gift. You put a memory card (SD?) in the slot, batteries in the slot/power cord if wanted, do a quick read of the instructions, then press the big RED record button and away you go. I select the highest quality available 96/24 and when recorded, I copy the file to my Mac for processing with some reverb/echo/fade outs and stuff in GarageBand usually. After saving the file with a name I can remember in 2 years time, like New Gibson xxx3478 which is bound for the lost pile, or better the name of the song and the version with a date: Angie2Feb15. This name gives a few clues for later on...... These files need to processed again by the software to a format that we can play on say, the Gibson Acoustic Forum. There are a lot of these but the most famous is a 'Wave' file in 16 bit. We can then copy the file to a sound file host like SoundCloud, and then anybody anywhere with a computer can access your tune!

 

Of course, you don't HAVE to do any of this if you just want to listen to your own guitar playing recording! You just plug in some headphones and play it back, or run a line-out to a stereo if you want to play it through some speakers.

 

Here is a link to Sweetwater Music's portable recorder page. If you want a more expensive recorder and higher quality, look at the Marantz PMD620 Mk2, then the Sony PCM-M10 which a lot of people like, and last but not least, the Zoom H1.

 

http://www.sweetwate...rs/high2low/pn2

 

Here is a video of the newer Zoom H1 - I would start you digital recording journey with this - they really are incredible:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cLvESdlgHAk

 

 

 

BluesKIng777.

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If anyone else adds to this I appreciate it.

Many excellent suggestions..thanks so much..I see there are different categories of option.

 

JJ the break down of each has me looking forwards to lookin into these (though the meaning of things like Audio Interface..AD Converter..Hard disk recording...ADAT...hardware recorders...throw me for a loop and are not that clear, but I have some idea)

 

I am a person from 1971...to me...instead of the digital recording (tick tick tick) direction everything went to...

I would have suggested the Super High Quality Metal Recording Tape available back then, in 3/4 or 1 inch wide, be put into a vibration free/dust resistant "Cassette" for recording music.

An improvement over open reels of tape..

 

But recording, kind of, direct on to a cd ..or into some "bank" which can then be written on to a cd sounds cool.

I have an Apple computer but to me connections look too flimsey & the tv sized too inconvienant to record move around and record on to. But it can maybe be used to record the finished disks(cds)..?

 

Great info thanks.

 

 

Sorry! Quick glosssary...

 

Audio interface - external interface like a sound card for a computer, turns analogue audio signals into something the computer can recognise. Some only do this, otbers have built in preamps and other features.

AD converter - analogue to digital converter

Hard disk recorder / hardware recorder - stand alone device that records and plays back digital audio

ADAT - a way of chaining systems together to increase inputs and outputs - also there were ADAT tape recorders that were very popular in the 90s, recording digitally to something that looked like a video cassette

 

As it goes I'm actually a big fan of analogue recording - I guess my generation were the last to grow up with tape as the default format, and my current studio still has a lovely old large format console and a couple of tape machines. But for ease of use and portability, digital is definately the way forward!

 

Some of the stand alone machines such as the HD24 may not be quite what you're looking for - just off the cuff thoughts of things I've used myself. But I'm sure there are other pro audio devices using the same technology that would be worth looking at.

 

Regarding your Mac, if one of those flimsy sockets is a Firewire socket, they should be pretty stable for recording. USB is also pretty common. Whatever you buy, find a local dealer who knows his stuff - it's well worth paying slightly over the web discounts and having someone to go to for advice if you find yourself struggling with it!

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