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JEV1A

Rosewood, Ebony or Baked Maple?

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"I'm interested to know what LP Players are preferring these days.. Rosewood, Ebony or the new Baked Maple Fingerboard's?

 

For myself other than a short experience with a 89' LP Studio Lite which had a Ebony Fingerboard, on every Gibson I have owned I have used Rosewood. I would love to know the general consensus of the new Baked Maple.

 

What is your preference?

 

Thanks

 

JV -Sights & Sounds Films

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"I'm interested to know what LP Players are preferring these days.. Rosewood, Ebony or the new Baked Maple Necks?

 

For myself other than a short experience with a 89' LP Studio Lite which had a Ebony Neck, on every Gibson I have owned I have used Rosewood. I would love to know the general consesus of the new Baked Maple necks.

 

What is your preference?

 

Thanks

 

JV -Sights & Sounds Films

 

I don't think the cost difference is that great when considering fretboard choices. The baked maple, dyed to look like rosewood of course, is a bit 'slippry-er' (is that a word?) than rosewood. The maple is less pourous than the rosewood. To look and feel it is harder. Not better or worse, just a bit different. The different wood choices might have a bit of an affect on tone anyway, ebony is a harder, denser wood. Yeah rosewood is pretty standard, but Gibson's rosewood debacle made them use baked maple instead.

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With a solid mahogany guitar, ebony is better since the brightness compliments the warm tone. On a maple-cap les paul, I prefer rosewood.

 

To me, baked maple is sort of like when people used acorns or chicory as a coffee substitute during WWII. Nobody liked it, but what else were you going to do? I would never consider baked maple a rosewood substitute as it is brighter and harder.

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"I'm interested to know what LP Players are preferring these days.. Rosewood, Ebony or the new Baked Maple Necks?

 

For myself other than a short experience with a 89' LP Studio Lite which had a Ebony Neck, on every Gibson I have owned I have used Rosewood. I would love to know the general consesus of the new Baked Maple necks.

 

What is your preference?

 

Thanks

 

JV -Sights & Sounds Films

 

LP players don't generally care for Ebony, Rosewood or Baked Maple necks....

 

BECAUSE GIBSON DOESN'T MAKE GUITARS WITH EBONY, ROSEWOOD OR BAKED MAPLE NECKS.

 

It's called a FRETBOARD or FINGERBOARD. That is one of my biggest pet peeves when it comes to guitars; people saying their guitar has a Rosewood or Ebony neck when it's either a Maple(not Baked) or Mahogany neck, with a fingerboard. A few companies make rosewood and baked maple necks (PRS and Suhr come to mind, respectively). But seriously, they're Fretboards/Fingerboards.

 

I like maple on my Fenders and Rosewood on my Gibsons. That is all.

 

-Ryan

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I'm one of the few who actually PREFERRS the new baked maple boards!

 

I like ebony boards...my LP Customs have that nice slick feel, and the baked maple on my SG 61 RI with the baked maple board sounds and feels similar to me. It took a little oiling to get it to where I like it, but now it's fantastic. I have rosewood on my Explorers, and that fits well for those guitars.

 

I bet a lot people forget about the 70s era Les Pauls with the maple fretboards. [biggrin]

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Prior to Gibson using the torrified maple, on their fingerboards, I had never

played any guitars, with that feature. I quite like it, as a fingerboard material. [thumbup]

I now have 2 Gibson's with torrified ("baked") maple fingerboards...a '61 "Satin" finished

SG reissue, and my Gold Top "Classic Custom" Les Paul. Really like the sound, feel, and

playability, of both! But, of course, I still love Rosewood, and Ebony, as well.

 

CB

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Prior to Gibson using the torrified maple, on their fingerboards, I had never

played any guitars, with that feature. I quite like it, as a fingerboard material. [thumbup]

I now have 2 Gibson's with torrified ("baked") maple fingerboards...a '61 "Satin" finished

SG reissue, and my Gold Top "Classic Custom" Les Paul. Really like the sound, feel, and

playability, of both! But, of course, I still love Rosewood, and Ebony, as well.

 

CB

 

 

Testify Brother Brown! [thumbup]

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I really like the baked maple. I'll admit to being very hostile towards it at first but I really enjoy it, moreso than rosewood if I'm perfectly honest. It's got the feel of ebony, and bends are effortless.

 

However, to me, getting THE CLASSIC Les Paul tone comes easiest with a rosewood fingerboard. Everything else just sounds a bit different to my ears.

 

Ebony seems to give it a bit more of a heavy metal vibe which isn't bad, just different.

 

I find each fingerboard good depending on the sound you are trying to get, as well as the style (fast, vibrato-intensive, etc.).

 

I still can't get myself to like granadillo or obeche though, I'm sorry...

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Most midi players prefer ebony fretboards (although maple telecasters are popular)as the hardness makes for better tracking. I also prefer the look of ebony as well.

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I have very thick callouses on my left finger tips from playing bass, acoustic, and electric guitars for over 40yrs. My finger tips cannot feel the difference between rosewood, ebony, or baked maple. I have guitars with all of those fret boards on them, fingers don't know what they are playing on. Now on the other hand, my eyes can see the difference of each one. Know what? everyone looks beautiful on each guitar and no big deal to me. I bought my Classic Custom because it has the baked maple on it. Just my opinion, but I would defy any player to blindfold them selves and have another person hand them any guitar and have them tell me what fretboard was on it. {using fretting hand only}. Not trying to sound like a jerk or a snob, but I can't feel the diff. If others can, please explain how I can tell, I would really like to know, if I'm wrong, I'm sorry. Get what feels good to you and what you like.

TC

ps: I think all the Classic Customs w/ baked maple are gone.

pps: All of this is just my humble opinion and not trying to start a war [-X

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I have the LP Vertigo with maple fingerboard and a Classic with baked fingerboard.

 

The LP with maple fingerboard has a much brighter tone and holds the sustain much much longer.

Only because of the fingerboard? Well.... to be honest; I don't have a glue. ;-)

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If someone can honestly say how with proof that a fingerboard material affects tone I'd be willing to listen but honestly once your finger is on the string it's the fret to bridge that you hear....nobody ever says they got a "new" tone with a scalloped fretboard, other than your amp and pedals setup.. the strings and pickups and wiring are the most important tone adjustments..( assuming tunning and intonation are good)...just my opinion....and if we are talking about bends than Fenders should be the best as their fretboards are coated( or sealed) and gibsons are not...but again the strings are being slide on the frets not the wood..or a combo there of...again my opinion.

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With a solid mahogany guitar, ebony is better since the brightness compliments the warm tone. On a maple-cap les paul, I prefer rosewood.

 

To me, baked maple is sort of like when people used acorns or chicory as a coffee substitute during WWII. Nobody liked it, but ? I would never consider baked maple a rosewood substitute as it is brighter and harder.

 

yes i prefer rosewood but ... what else were you going to do?

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I really like the baked maple. I'll admit to being very hostile towards it at first but I really enjoy it, moreso than rosewood if I'm perfectly honest. It's got the feel of ebony, and bends are effortless.

 

However, to me, getting THE CLASSIC Les Paul tone comes easiest with a rosewood fingerboard. Everything else just sounds a bit different to my ears.

 

Ebony seems to give it a bit more of a heavy metal vibe which isn't bad, just different.

 

I find each fingerboard good depending on the sound you are trying to get, as well as the style (fast, vibrato-intensive, etc.).

 

I still can't get myself to like granadillo or obeche though, I'm sorry...

yeah granadillo or obeche ... ewwww! lol

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yeah granadillo or obeche ... ewwww! lol

 

Obeche should Never have been used for fingerboards. It's a body wood, a Very soft one at that. It has None of the characteristics you want in a fretboard. Gibson screwed up on that.

 

-Ryan

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I've been playing for about 47 years now and have played many, many different guitars with a lot of different fretboards. I prefer the baked maple that Gibson used on its 2011 & 2012 guitars. I love the feel and playability so much that I bought 4 new Gibsons with the baked maple (les paul classic plus, les paul junior special with p90's and with humbuckers, and the sg standard limited). I also like finished maple (Fender style), Richlite and ebony. The baked maple is definately my favorite though. It's hard and slick! I've never been that enthusiastic about rosewood fretboards. Which is why I'm a bit upset that Gibson is going back to rosewood.

 

Gibson should at the very least, continue making a few models with the baked maple fretboards. The fact that they are discontinuing baked maple just shows that they are more about pleasing traditionalists than maintaining an innovative edge in the market. It's disappointing to say the least.

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I am not sure if it makes that big of a difference to the tone or playability, but I do prefer my LP with the baked maple over my LP with the rosewood. It sounds to me like there is more "bite" with the baked maple. I don't have enough experience with ebony to weigh in on that debate.

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LP players don't generally care for Ebony, Rosewood or Baked Maple necks....

 

BECAUSE GIBSON DOESN'T MAKE GUITARS WITH EBONY, ROSEWOOD OR BAKED MAPLE NECKS.

 

It's called a FRETBOARD or FINGERBOARD. That is one of my biggest pet peeves when it comes to guitars; people saying their guitar has a Rosewood or Ebony neck when it's either a Maple(not Baked) or Mahogany neck, with a fingerboard. A few companies make rosewood and baked maple necks (PRS and Suhr come to mind, respectively). But seriously, they're Fretboards/Fingerboards.

 

I like maple on my Fenders and Rosewood on my Gibsons. That is all.

 

-Ryan

 

Sorry for the confusion, have always called them "Necks" but they are as you state a Fretboard and Fingerboard wood is the question here.

Best

JEV

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Yeah rosewood is pretty standard, but Gibson's rosewood debacle made them use baked maple instead.

 

Interesting analysis of the so-called Gibson "Rosewood" debacle causing them to possibly use baked Maple. I'm not sure of the outcome or if the case is closed on the Feds raiding Gibson I think in 2010. Maybe the use of Maple was a outcome of the sentencing or provisions set forth in the case.

 

Wish a Gibson Moderator could chime in here. I had thought about their issues and then suddenly they came out with Baked Maple Fingerboards. But I see and hear now they are possibly dumping the baked Maple?

 

Good to hear that players are OK on the most part with Baked Maple.

 

Best

 

JEV -Sights & Sounds Films

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With a solid mahogany guitar, ebony is better since the brightness compliments the warm tone. On a maple-cap les paul, I prefer rosewood.

 

To me, baked maple is sort of like when people used acorns or chicory as a coffee substitute during WWII. Nobody liked it, but what else were you going to do? I would never consider baked maple a rosewood substitute as it is brighter and harder.

 

My mom told me about that Coffee substitute and she also said it made her gag! So I see your point fully. Baked Maple may have been born from the Feds raiding Gibson although I cannot confirm this.

 

Rosewood is not going away soon for sure..

 

Thanks

 

JEV

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