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StewartB

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About StewartB

  • Rank
    Dazed and Confused
  • Birthday 05/24/1954

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Brisbane, Australia
  • Interests
    Guitars and world domination.
  1. Thanks guys for the suggestions. I think the microphonic tube theory is the next thing to check out. I have several spares and will go through a process of swapping them out. One thing I didn't say before that might point to the "tube theory" is that the noise often doesn't occur immediately, but usually happens after a few minutes of playing. StewartB
  2. My Traynor YCV40 seems to have an issue with buzzing when you play certain notes/postions on the fretboard - mostly G & D notes. It happens as the played note decays. I put it through an extension cabinet and the buzz is gone, so it must be an issue with something loose in the amp, amp cabinet, or speaker. I have checked the speaker mount, the spring clamps that hold the two 6L6GC tubes, the control knobs, the cabinet screws, and anything else that is accessible without going inside the head. I guess that is my next step and I'll check the 12AX7 mounts, etc. I am raising this post just in case anyone on the forum has had a past problem with an elusive buzz at certain playing frequencies and managed to solve the problem. It might narrow down the search. Any thoughts appreciated. StewartB
  3. Here's a dictionary definition that probably sums it all up............................... mud·dy (md)adj. mud·di·er, mud·di·est a. Not bright or pure: a muddy color.b. Not clear; cloudy, as with sediment: muddy coffee.3. Lacking luster; dull: a muddy complexion.4. Confused or vague: muddy thinking. Works for me................ StewartB
  4. Assuming Gibby/Epi is correct and only 70 are being made, then the Casino becomes a "collectible" rather than a guitar. The value of a collectible item has nothing necessarily to do with better quality, only rarity. They will only be bought by collectors and maybe onsold in future years at a higher price?? Can't see a working muso buying one at that price. StewartB
  5. Nice Jim. I want one too............... Enjoy. StewartB
  6. I'm using the Tonepros Bridge on my Epi LP and Epi Dot - found them to be excellent with no buzz and better intonation than the stock. Heard good things about Gotoh as well, so don't think you have done the wrong thing. I also use the TUSQ nuts and found them to be great as well. They may need a litlle filing to deepen the string grooves depending on how you like your action. Good luck with the mods, StewartB
  7. Yes, I believe it was Gretsch who got upset because they had a drum kit called "Broadkaster". Fender changed the name to Telecaster in 1950 I think. Somehow it may have been a fateful decision. Imagine calling your guitar a "Broad" rather than a "Tele". Funny old world isn't it? StewartB
  8. Hard to guess the context of his comment "this guitar is just crippling me beyond belief" - whatever the reason he didn't throw it away and it remains as the iconic Lennon guitar choice. Probably just having a bad day at the office? StewartB
  9. The higher value cap, the "darker" the tone. 22uf is pretty standard for LPs. Since the control cavity is easy to get into, you could try both values - .015 & .22. That way you can decide which is best. the .015 should be brighter - maybe a little too bright? Good luck, StewartB
  10. Yes, I think you are right. I didn't notice that mentioned in the post. The Lacquer Line have serials stamped into the headstock. Stewart
  11. What you have, I think, is a Japanese made "Limited Lacquer Line" EPI Les Paul Custom. Good score if it is. They are made for the Japanese market and are allowed to use the normal Gibson Headstock. There should be a serial number with a letter and six digits stamped into the back of the headstock if it is one of those. StewartB
  12. Mate, good luck with the surgery. I'm sure the patient will make a speedy recovery. StewartB
  13. Stein has summed it up pretty well. My belief is that the supposed superiority of MIK is mostly "urban myth". By giving away my age, I can say that when I was a kid, the expression "Made in Japan" meant that whether it was a kid's toy, a radio, or a car, the item was poorly made and would break down and fail. That was partly true because back then Japan had become industrialised after the war and it took them some time to get their production lines, supply chains, and people skills up to a level matching the US or Europe. Nowadays "Made in Japan" means top quality and most of us would walk barefoot over broken glass to get a "Made in Japan" Epi. Times changed and Korea became the new Japan with the same early quality control problems, and now (since maybe 2001) China is becoming the new Japan. Just like Japan they have to get their production lines and skills up to standard. To answer your question, I would say that a MIK Epi from perhaps 1990 to maybe 2001 was definitely a better guitar tham a MIC Epi from perhaps pre-2002. This has all changed because the Chinese factories are now up to speed and any problem you see in your new MIC Epi is likely to be caused by the EPI "bean counters" who decide how much can be paid for the tuners, pickups, and bridges. They set the price points. I have a 2009 MIC Epi Dot. Sure enough, I upgraded the bridhe, nut and most other parts the "bean counters" gave me, but the guitar is well made, solid, plays well, and will outlast me. StewartB
  14. Thanks. I will do the swap this weekend and see what it sounds like. I think the existing speaker has an SPL of about 95 whereas the Texas Heat specs say 99. Possibly the higher efficiency of the Texas Heat will make the sound levels about the same. Thanks to all offering advice. Appreciated. Stewart
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