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chefothefuture

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About chefothefuture

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  1. Thanks. I actually should post some pics of this. I'm not sure if any one has been foolhardy enough to dissect one before! LOL! I have heard about Wafflebacks getting taken apart.... The back plates are secured to the housing by two hollow rivets at either end. The head is countersunk to accept the screws that secure the tuner to the peg head. The back of the rivet is flared out and pressed flat so that the back plate is secured to the gear housing. Simple as that. I thought that brass eyelets from a hobby shop might work, but was weary that the heads are not countersunk. Cheers! Chef
  2. Hi Gang, Do any of you guys know the size of the eyelet/rivet used to secure the housing to the backplate on the Sealfast tuner? The same would be used on a Waffleback (I think....) I also need to locate these. McMaster Carr doesn't have anything like it that I've found.... The good folks at Kluson/WD couldn't help, but they did say a re-issue Sealfast is "on the drawing board".... All the best, Chef
  3. Hi Gang, Do any of you guys know the size of the eyelet/rivet used to secure the housing to the backplate on the Sealfast tuner? The same would be used on a Waffleback (I think....) I also need to locate these. McMaster Carr doesn't have anything like it that I've found.... The good folks at Kluson/WD couldn't help, but they did say a re-issue Sealfast is "on the drawing board".... All the best, Chef
  4. Hi Gang, Do any of you guys know the size of the eyelet/rivet used to secure the housing to the backplate on the Sealfast tuner? The same would be used on a Waffleback (I think....) I also need to locate these. McMaster Carr doesn't have anything like it that I've found.... The good folks at Kluson/WD couldn't help, but they did say a re-issue Sealfast is "on the drawing board".... All the best, Chef
  5. If you can demo both some place, do so and form your own opinion. I have an L5CT Double cut that I adore. I prefer a 25.5" scale and so the Byrdlands I have played feel cramped. Odd since I also play Rickenbackers.... A 175 is a fairly different animal, being that it's a little smaller (16" lower bout) and that for the most part they are laminate and not solid wood. That is not to say that a laminate guitar can't sound great (my Tal Farlow can attest to that) but there is a magic about a carved spruce top.
  6. If you want to put a Bigsby B6 True Vibrato tailpiece on your guitar, do it. It's your guitar. Yes, you'll be tuning a little more often than not, but once you learn the "in's and out's" of the Bigsby you might find you've expanded your playing style. Any added screwholes are on the end of the guitar anyway, and might actually be covered by the hinged plate. If not, an experienced repair shop could touch it up if it bugs you. Minor. Here's a picture of my Tal Farlow with a B6 :-)
  7. That would certainly bring out a different dimension. Right now, it pretty happy with the throaty tone with a brief top end ring on the end of a note. Given that I play flats, it has a pleasing balance to my ear.
  8. Actually I have not. I'll post one when I get it back from having some work done.... Yes, those Tals are great guitars :-)
  9. Over the top? Well, You can never be too rich, or too thin.... I'm now waiting for a Super 400 Double cut! LOL! Completely agree that this is beyond what a 335 customer would want unless they were going after a vintage one. Though there are some new models out of the Custom Shop that are fairly expensive....
  10. Ok- Well, here is the result of a retro-fit. Caution be darned! LOL! My guitar and I like the result. I tried a "dry fit" with Imperials, but I preferred the Cartier like elegance of the Waffleback. Now if only there were a Sealfast re-issue.....
  11. I think it could depend on the particular model of tuner. The modern Kluson Deluxe can be pretty difficult even with the tighter ratio, but even the original deluxe's are a love/hate thing. Conversely, I've had modern wafflebacks on my Tal Farlow for three years with no complaints. Same on a couple of Gretsch's. Schaller's are certainly more consistent, so it makes sense from a production standpoint to use a tuner that would not be a potential warranty issue.
  12. Ok- here are a couple of photos.. I'll try to get some better ones soon.
  13. LOL! Well, it's so amazing as it is I'll give back that half point. A perfect 10 she is. Photos to come when I get some decent light. I only have an iPhone and I'd like to catch some of the figuring.
  14. Very true, but I group the 60's-70's ES150 in with the 335 family due to it's body shape. The full depth on those is cool though.
  15. Hi all. Well I guess this might also serve as as introduction to this forum. Though a "newbe" to this forum, I've been well acquainted with Gibsons and other brands (and their respective forums)for well beyond three decades. So I was delighted to see that Gibson finally gave their big bodied guitars a double venetian cutaway production model. Even though the 335 family has existed since 1958, I never thought they really fit the ideal. The Byrd custom was a tantalizer for sure! Now that I have one, I must say that it has fulfilled almost all of my expectations and then some. It did need some addition set up work, but to be fair, I bought mine second hand, so it might have been just the way the guitar has settled in. Sound wise it's fantastic. Yeah, so the double cutaways and thinner CT body do effect the tone but I didn't buy it for it's tone solely as an acoustic so that really wasn't an issue. It's tone acoustically isn't bad either, so I'm not unhappy. In some ways though, I would have liked a full depth better, but that's just because I like the look better. However, this guitar is just fine the way it is so I'm not complaining. The only other thin I can think of that bugs me are the Schaller M6s. I would have preferred Super Klusons but that's an appearance thing, not a functional one. The one thing that still puzzles me is why Gibson chose to do this on an L5. It would seem that given the demographic that goes for this body style, a laminate bodied guitar like an ES5 or a Tal Farlow would find a greater market. Who knows? I'm not complaining. So- On a scale of 1 to 10, I'll gave it a 9.5. The .5 point off for not being a full depth.... Cheers, chef
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