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WScott

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About WScott

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  1. Hi Herman, You have been through it! I am glad you are still around and I hope you still have two or three of those nine lives left to use! You have a real variety of guitars. I hope you still get to play them. I have followed a teacher from Australia on You Tube. He uses a beautiful Epi. You may have seen him. He plays everything at a nice slow, even tempo -- and he hits every note with such precision and clarity that it sounds wonderful. In his hands that Epi is a good as any guitar made. Between your kids and mine there will be a lot of guitars inherited - hopefully not before about 2025. My playing has improved some despite my fingers. And even with just three fingers on my left hand I have learned, and can play, a ton of chords I never even knew when I was just playing my old 12 string. So I am keeping at it. I have changed from flat to wound strings because they seem easier for me to play. But, otherwise, I am still learning every day, still anxious to get at it every morning, still loving the sounds and the songs. Be well! Scott
  2. HI, Ty. Thank you for your post. I am afraid I have a less ambitious plan than yours. You probably read I am 78 and have a genetic problem causing my fingers to curl. I have already lost almost all use of the little finger on my fretting hand. I may lose it altogether in the years ahead. I also do not have a good musical background. I am self taught. I played very part-time as single Country singer through much of my 25 years in the military and my years of working after I retired from the military. I played open chords on a single 12-string all those years. So I do not have the time, background or the dexterity to really learn to play jazz with any degree of competence. BUT, :) , there is always a BUT, since grade school, I have always been primarily a singer anyway. So my plan is one of self study to try to learn to sing as many standard jazz tunes as I can -- as you know they are tougher to play and sing than Country songs. But I have over 100 standards in my hand-produced lead sheet book already. As I sing, I study some instruction books I have, learn as much as I can about chords, scales, etc., and try to enjoy playing the great guitars I have gradually acquired over the past two years. I have a great Henriksen amp. And I have used MIDI backing tracks for my singing since about 1994. So I have a lot of them, some now with Big Band sounds. I have always loved the sound of jazz and especially jazz guitars. But I could not afford a good jazz guitar until all the kids were gone and the mortgages paid. Now I can spend hours practicing songs, chords, etc. Many chords I have to finger in less than the optimal way. But the midi tracks cover me a bit. I have been really pleased to get so I can play a number of standards now without the midi -- just me and one of the mellow guitars. This is satisfying. I no longer have all four of my Gibson guitars. My plan was always to leave them to my children as part of their inheritance. The two boys play a bit so they received their guitars before Christmas, the 335 and the 175. My step son is picking up a very nice Heritage guitar I have for him. The final two Gibson's will go to my daughters, but, they hope, not for a long time. And the grandchildren and great grandchildren may like to him them one day too. So I am happy to hear you are taking up Jazz guitar so seriously. I wish I had done so many years ago. I am sure you will get great pleasure from it. My two sons have already told me they have a hard time putting their guitars down once they start to play. Life really is short! Do what you love! Scott
  3. I am now satisfied it is a Gibson Custom made guitar. It is a Citation model. Very nice, but still so expensive. The logos are very similar to the Heritage logos. Wish I had the money! Scott
  4. There is an orange Guaranteed label inside; the serial number is 21740001. The seller says it is a 2000 model and the serial number seems to support that - maybe the first one they built in that year? The seller is asking over $14,000! And that is one of least expensive Citations I have seen. :o Thanks, Scott
  5. Hi, I saw a guitar listed for sale recently as a 2000 Gibson Kalamazoo Award L-5 Citation. What are, or were, Gibson Kalamazoo Award guitar? I read they were only produced until 1984 when Gibson left Kalamazoo but I do not know if this is accurate. Of course, the Citation is a real top-of-the-line model. So did Gibson continue to produce Kalamazoo Award custom guitars after leaving Michigan? If so, did they make a Citation Kalamazoo Award model in 2000? Thanks, Scott
  6. I did not know the Railroad business was so dangerous. I am glad you made it through. I know I always feel lucky to have made it through Vietnam and Korea, which was still a very dangerous place with a nightly nation-wide curfew when I was there in the early 60's, without a scratch. I was working at the Pentagon on 9/11 and the blast rocked my chair. If you see a tall guy in a white hard hat walking around in the smoke that was me. I sent all the contractors home right after the blast but stayed around to do what I could for the First Responds until midnight. So I feel lucky for a lot of reasons. But I can't stretch my little finger sideways at all. Either I get it over the string and drop is down or it is no good. So it can't make any stretch to a fourth fret and full bar major chords are becoming a problem too. And on most chords I actually have the side of the little finger on the string. So more and more chords are becoming impossible it seems like each day. They tell me I could lose the little finger completely in a few year. So I keep looking for different ways to play some chords. And I am just beginning to learn the almost unlimited ways you can play some jazz and triad chords. I would like a Blues Jr too. Maybe one day I will pick one up. I have exhausted my desire to buy new guitars and love the ones I have. Like I think I said, they will all go to my kids, one already has. I promised them each an amp too. All the ones I have are solid state and I will probably buy a Blues Jr III some day just to try one tube amp before I die. I really can't play well enough to solo on any tune. I have really limited dexterity in my left hand. But I am still a fair singer and love the sound of the jazz guitars even with my limited finger picking. So what are the seven guitars you have now? Good talking with you! Scott :)
  7. Hi All, I have a 1978 ES-175 that sounds great but is a little worn. I am 78 and I just passed it on to my son. It is a "Second" and has that stamped on the back of the head stock along with the serial number. I paid almost $2,500 for it. Being a 1978, I assume it was most likely made in Kalamazoo. I have heard they had great quality control with very high standards and that "seconds" were so good they were usually offered first to employees but I do not know if that is true. I am wondering generally about the value of "seconds" produced by Gibson. Particularly whether or not they may appreciate over time in a way similar to other Gibson's of the same age and model. Any ideas or insights? Thanks, Scott
  8. Hi All, I have a 1978 ES-175 that sounds great but is a little worn. I am 78 and I just passed it on to my son. It is a "Second" and has that stamped on the back of the head stock along with the serial number. I paid almost $2,500 for it. Being a 1978, I assume it was most likely made in Kalamazoo. I have heard they had great quality control with very high standards and that "seconds" were so good they were usually offered first to employees but I do not know if that is true. I am wondering generally about the value of "seconds" produced by Gibson. Particularly whether or not they may appreciate over time in a way similar to other Gibson's of the same age and model. Any ideas or insights? Thanks, Scott
  9. HI again,Chadgauge, I can see now the guitars you have. Welcome to the forum. I am sorry that I don't know enough to answer your question but I am sure there are others who can. I live down in the northwestern part of NC. My wife and I were married in Alexandria and we worked at the Pentagon before retiring down here. My wife took her first guitar lesson yesterday! So we are both starting a little late on new endeavors. Enjoy! Scott
  10. Hi Pip, Thank you very much for your response and the information. Although I am still expecting to live a while, I have already passed the '78 on to one of my sons. I appreciate your help. Regards, Scott
  11. Hi Chadgauge, Thank you. I am 78 and my plan was to get some good guitars and then leave them to my children as part of their "inheritance." I just mailed the ES-175 off to one of them today. I suppose the ES-335 will be the next to go. I just love playing the L-5 and the Switchmaster. I could not play all four of them so I decided to send a couple off early. I am pretty healthy so I am hoping I will be around a while. And playing the L-5 and the Switchmaster will be more than enough to keep me busy. What Gibson's do you have ? Do you play professionally? I am a poor guitar player who played simple chords for about 30 years on one 12 string. I wore it out. Now in my old age I am doing my best to learn as much about playing jazz as I can. It is an impossible task. But it keeps me anxious to get up every morning and get at it. :) Thanks for your message. Scott
  12. Wow, how does your wife know what to buy you when it comes to guitars? That is wonderful. My wife and I hit 34 last November. But it is actually my third marriage. I have been thinking about a Fender Blues Junior III. But i spent a lot on a Henriksen Jazz Amp and a Henriksen Bud. One was used. They are both solid state but the sounds seem great to me. I actually thought about all the Fender amps but some jazz instructor I saw on You Tube recommended the Henriksen amps. So I got one used and liked it so much I got the smaller Bud new. I like the fact that the Bud has two channels and two line outs plus another out to go to a Henriksen cabinet. So I got one of them too. I use MIDI files to back up my singing and playing. My playing is very weak -- and getting worse since my fingers started curling. But I just love the sound of the jazz guitars and keep trying to learn as much as I can -- after a very, very late start. I found there is actually a new part of this forum that is just for trying to find out things about your Gibson guitar. They ask for serial numbers, pictures, descriptions, etc. I gave them all the information I had. There were a lot of people who had already submitted requests for information. So I fully expect they will be back to me soon. I don't think mine will hard to identify. I wrote down the 800 number and the e-mail address. Thank you. Do you still have the 2007 Gibson? I only hope it has continued to appreciate. All of my guitars will go to my children as their "inheritance." They may not get much more than that. But they are all doing well. I am proud of them. They all live in Minnesota. I am always happy to know of someone who actually retired when he could still get a retirement check. I have a friend in Arizona who has kept getting his from IBM for more than 30 years. And I have now been getting my retired military check for longer than the 25 years I served. Too many people have lost their retirements or are working now without any hope of ever having a retirement. It is sad. None of my kids will have a retirement income and they are all between 50 and 60 years old. Social Security is all there is left. And there are some that want to reduce that. Sad. Good talking with you, Herman! Scott
  13. Hi, I am 78 and new to Gibson guitars this year --when I decided to try to learn how to play jazz guitar as best I can before I die. Over the past year I have purchased four beautiful Gibson guitars. I love them all. I plan to pass one on to each of my four children and I would like to provide them as much information as I can about each of them. So I am posting pictures, information, and serial numbers in the hope that you will be able to help identify at least the correct production place and date. Thank you for your time and help. 1. Gibson ES-175. Serial Number: 71368009. I was told this is a 1978 model but the serial number makes me wonder if it is a 1977. It has "second" stamped on the back of the head stock along with the serial number. There is no label on the inside that I can see. It is pictured below along with the ES-335. It came to me in what was clearly not the original case. 2. Gibson ES-335. Serial Number: 70222. This one was listed as Gibson Memphis 1963 ES-335 VOS. There is an orange GUARANTEED label inside that has handwritten "ES-335TD" after "Style"on it. The label is also stamped "GUITAR" after "Gibson" and the serial number after "number." No other hand written information on the label. The lower part of the label under GUARANTEED only says "against faulty workmanship and materials" and "Gibson." The serial number is stamped on the back of the head stock. It came to me in what appeared to be an original black, five hasp, case with plush yellow lining but no logos on it. 3. Gibson Custom L-5 CES. Serial Number: 91456004 I was told this is a 1996 model but the serial number makes me question that. The orange GUARANTEED label inside has hand written "Guitar" after "Style", "L5-CES" after "Gibson", and the serial number after "Number." The bottom of the label says "Gibson Custom Nashville, Tennessee U.S.A." The serial number is stamped on the back of the head stock. It is pictured below with the Switchmaster. I have no other pictures that I could make small enough for the system to accept. It came to me in what appears to be its original brown case with the combination lock, silk cover and the "USA GIBSON" logo on it. 4. Gibson Custom ES-5 Switchmaster. Serial Number: 90947007 I was told this is a 1997 model but the serial number makes me question that. The orange GUARANTEED label inside has hand written "Guitar" after "Style", "ES-5 Switchmaster" after "Gibson", and the serial number after "Number." The bottom of the label says "Gibson Custom Nashville, Tennessee U.S.A." The serial number is stamped on the back of the headstock. There is a horizontal grain pattern on the top and back that is beautiful but does not show up well in the only picture I was able to post. It came to me in what appears to be its original brown case with the combination lock, silk cover and the "USA GIBSON" logo on it. Thank you again for you help. Regards, Scott
  14. Hi Herman, Thank you. I decided to pass part of his "inheritance" on early to my second son (he is the only one playing guitar at this time) by sending him the 1978 ES-175. But he is not sure he should take it. I discovered it is actually a "second." But I think with the great quality control they had back in '78 that does not mean much. The guitar seems sound structurally. And I love the sound it puts out through my amps. I would think it should start to appreciate soon. It is over 40 years old, sounds great, and was probably made in the old Kalamazoo plant. I thought I read that the "seconds' were so good there they offered them to their employees first. I love playing all four of them. But the mellow L-5 fits most of the music I play best. Do you think anyone from Gibson will respond to my request for information about the four serial numbers? Or is there a better place I should post them to get a response? I hope you had a great Holidays! Scott
  15. As I promised I am posting pictures of my four guitars. I just got two back from the Set-up Man. He does a great job. I am also listing the serial numbers of the four guitars. I think I have the wrong year of manufacture on a couple of them. So I would appreciate if someone could give me the correct years and places of manufacturing on the four of them so I can pass that information on to my children - who will one day become the owners! ;) L-5: 91456004 Switchmaster: 90947007 ES-335 VOS: 70222 ES-175: 71368009 Thank you all!!
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