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drumrnmuzik

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About drumrnmuzik

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  1. Amen brother. Sounds like you got a good start with a musican father.
  2. Warmoth claims on their site that the 24 3/4" neck just needs the saddles moved to get the proper intonation. I wonder how much? What tonal difference would I get by changing the orignal maple Strat neck a shorter one? Lower & deeper sound? Thanks for the great feeback you guys.
  3. It's like a Strat with Humbuckers, it's not a Gibson. I've tried splitting Humbuckers on my SG, but it's not a Strat Some times you just need a certain sound. I've had a Jaguar but it's not the same sound. Could you see Stevie Ray with a Gibson? Don't fit.
  4. Finally something that fits my gig. I use a mini torque wrench made for drums and it's great. I drop the strainers on the snare and work down. Each drum is one tone lower than the previous. I keep the bottom skin at the same torque as the top. Maybe i'm wrong, but it fits.. I phrase my drumming as much as the musical message dictates while trying to maintain a solid reference for the other musicans.. My drumming follows the tonal progression so I feel like I'm doing my job. It's not just wopping on the drums like an drunken ape. I find it really good to see guitarists considering drums in a tonal manner. This Gibby site never ends to impress me!
  5. Since my little fingers can't get around those long baseball bats, I'd like to mount a Warmoth 12 degree 24 3/4 neck on the only "F" company guitar left in my house. Actually I admit that I like that single coil sound with a maple neck. Anybody ever tried a Warmoth neck swap? Thanks for ya'lls comments.
  6. Hi zigzag, I've owned a Roland Cube 20 and must admit that it had a really increable sound. I know that when a manufacturer designs an amp they go for a particular sound. Thats where they put in the eq circuits. Treble cuts, bass enhancers. They are just freqeuency filters. They tweek the sound. If you play a Blackheart Ant, it doesn't have any eq color. It's a sub 1w amp with only a volume control. Of course you have to play really low volume or it breaks up, the tube saturates, and thats the way they designed it. Also tube construction is a big deal too. Try 6L6s and EL34s, due to the internal tube construction and material, they also color the sound. Meaning that they promote certian frequencies and repress others. The famous American vs the British sounds. My Gibby L6S has two treble cut tone controls, so if I put the tone controls at ten, then I get the pure guitar sound. BTW, the L6S is all maple, so it's extremly bright tone wood. Mohogany is much more warm tone wood.
  7. I'm not a guitar guru but I have worked in electronics all my life. I can add is this; - Class A amplifiers mean that the single driver tube works on the positive and negative sides of zero voltage - Class A/B amplifiers mean that there are two output tubes (or 2 halves of one tube). One tube outputs the positive peak, the other, the negative. The advantages are that a Class A amp is more precise. Less transient lag and distiortion. A Class A/B amp is cheaper to build. A Class A amp is much cleaner sound. Harmonics are created every time that a string is plucked. From the primary note, for example 440hz, a first harmonic would be 880hz, doubling in frequency and reducing volume by more or less 1/2. Obstructions on the string will cause spurious harmonics. (squealies) If you have the same frequency of opposing polarities and equal amplitudes, you will cancel out the signal. Noise canceling headphones work this way. Now this is the point that I'm not too sure about, but it is reasonable to suppose that the transient point of the Class A/B amp could come into play here. At the cross over point, the ouput tube doesn't shut off at perfect 0 volts. There will always be some milllivolts +/-, these millivolts are sounds for us. If the input to the tube stays idle for some milliseconds it can hang on those spurious sounds or fade, depending on the circuits. These could be the "harmonics" that you are talking about. I doubt if this helps but it was fun to write...
  8. Holy snikies sinner! Nice job, actually excellent! You really have a nice looking axe there. I just know that my S1 wants to grow and look like your junior. Ok, Im convinced. I'll give it a go. I'll bet that the coat of poly on top of the nitro will peel off with the heated nitro. Yessir, now I'm psych'ed. Gonna try it. Thanks to all for the good ideas. BTW, Merry Christmas to all.
  9. Some great suggestions here, thanks. I have striped down an Ibanez with chemical strip and the acid had a funny effect on the wood and darkened the viens. I covered it with tung oil and it came out "ok". Iwant this to come out perfect. I have seen the heat gun and scraper used, but on thick oil based paint. That scraper scares me on those delicate S1 lines. Hope about a rotary sander? Will chemical stripper mark adler ? Thanks again for your helpful comments.
  10. Only thing that every worked in Italy is the ban on smoking in ALL public places. Everyone goes outside to smoke. Even in the rain...
  11. Beyond my cheesy attempt to get noticed here, I have a real issue and I hope that someone can help out. My new old Gibson S1 is about to get a complete fret job and that will get her playable, BUT, the finish has almost 40 years of hard abuse. - The original nitro cellulose finish had been attacked by turkey numerous platter belt buckles so the back is in extreme poor shape - Some dweeb spray painted polyurethane on top of the nitro, complete with runs and wrinkles So I guess that I have two options - Leave it as it is and let it reflect the glorious past that it has had - Strip it down and get it in pristine condition If I strip it down, how in goodness name do I do it ? - Chemical strip on an adler body? - Sand it down and maybe mess up the fine lines and bevels? Has anyone had good experiences with striping down a gee tar? (BTW, the neck finish is in good shape) Thanks if someone can give some good suggestions
  12. Thanks Willy, The link was interesting, in theory I should have a sticker for a serial number. The Made IN USA is stamped into the head stock right under the 6 numbers "1969-1975: 6 digit peghead stamped serial number, MADE IN USA stamped below" "1975-1977: tagged (decal) serial number, MADE IN USA below." I may be in that grey area, 1975 decal or 1975 pressed into the wood, right before they started with the decals. Since it's adler body, it should be a 1975. I've seen numerous persons say that they only made adler in 1975. It fun to hold a piece of history in my hands!
  13. I don't like maple fretboards. I have to put my glasses on to see the strings...
  14. Hello, I purchased a Gibson S1 yesterday and am very please with it. Yes, it needs some work. New frets and tuners, and the heal plate and bridge cover need a trip to the chrome shop but the neck and body are sturdy. Once back in pristine state she will really turn some heads. Last night once I finally got home with my new beauty, I went on the Gibson serial numbers list and the numbers just don't match up. #967483 is stamped into the head stock, no sticker. I should be a 75 since the body looks like adler. I'd kinda curious when my girl was born. I read through the list metamorphosis that the serial numbers went through, but my 6 numbers don't seem to apply to 1975 or anything within the 4 years that they made S1's. Someone have some ideas ?
  15. Andy, Nice heads up on that Peterson strobe tuner. I got one for the phone yesterday and it works great. I always carry my phone, don't always have a tuner in my pocket. Thanks
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