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please help out an acoustic noob like me!


e_lespaul

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i have been playing electric guitar for a few years now and recently got given an old 3/4 classical guitar(i think)

. Anyway i wanna buy a nice acoustic guitar and have a few questions:

 

what is the difference between an acoustic and a classical guitar?

 

should i go for steel strings or nylon?

 

and should i get an electro acoustic?

 

 

by the way im looking for a full size guitar 8-[

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A classical guitar is an acoustic guitar, although they have become more common with electric pickups.

 

Generally, though, the term "acoustic guitar" is used to refer to a steel-stringed guitar that does not need amplification to achieve the target sound.

 

As for which to go for, from the standpoint of it being a learning experience I'd say if you've been playing an electric guitar for a few years you're good to go with a steel string. Many beginners are counseled to start with a classical guitar b/c there is no callousing of the fretting fingers (along with the well known pain 8-[ ) ; you're obviously beyond that barrier and so, if the sound is what you're looking for, you're ready for it.....

 

Having said that, though, I will say that I actually prefer the sound of a good classical nylon string guitar more than even that of my new Breedlove custom shop steel string 000. There's something very "expressive" about nylon that a good luthier can bring out, it's not only a pleasure to listen to but also a pleasure to play. The feel is very different, as is the actual motion of plucking the strings--to get the best sound from a nylon string guitar, it's necessary to depress the strings toward the soundboard and release them by lifting the fingers off the string (obviously very quickly).

 

The electro/acoustic classical guits I've heard recently were every bit as good as those which were acoustic only--I suspect you might need to get into the stratospheric price range before the addition of the electronics for A/E use would really cause the sound to suffer. As for steel string guitars, I would say it depends on what type of pickup is used, some reproduce more life-like sound than others, but if you like to perform for others, even on open-mic nights at the pubs, the A/E feature comes in quite handy. The venue I frequent can mic a guitar, but the sound is not as well defined as when the performer can plug in....

 

Dugly

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thanks for your replies, very informative

 

and i will probably be getting a cutaway acoustic. still not sure bout nylon or steel strung and as for acoustic or electro acoustic... well my wallet will decide that :-

 

so about nylon or steel strings. do steel strings have more sustain than nylon ones?

 

are nylon strings louder and more mellow? (this is what i would imagine)

 

and how much for a nice guitar like the epiphone above?

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thanks for your replies' date=' very informative

 

and i will probably be getting a cutaway acoustic. still not sure bout nylon or steel strung and as for acoustic or electro acoustic... well my wallet will decide that #-o

 

so about nylon or steel strings. do steel strings have more sustain than nylon ones?

 

are nylon strings louder and more mellow? (this is what i would imagine)

 

and how much for a nice guitar like the epiphone above?[/quote']

 

It really depends on what kind of music you want to play.

 

Classical guitars are used mostly for Classical or Flamenco music, use nylon strings, have flatter, wider fretboards, and a softer, mellower tone. Flat top steel string guitars are more widely used for all types of popular music, and are louder with lots of overtones. Archtops are generally thought of as Jazz boxes, and usually have a very punchy midrange tone.

 

Go to a music store and play some guitars.

 

The answers to all of your questions are there.

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