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SERIAL NUMBER SEARCH


TerryWrightMusic
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Well, the L-type list shows #114 and #116 in 1982, but at this time bolt-on models didn't exist yet, I believe. What type is your bass? XP2? Then I'd think 1983 could be a plausible date, and Newburgh is the place of manufacturing.

 

The list of serials (and the whole SteinbergerWorld website) are maintained by Andy Yakubik. If you hope to find more information, then you could probably ask him (via the "Links & Credits" page on the SW website). SteinbergerWorld contains the most comprehensive information about Steinies on the whole web, so if you don't find your answer there, I doubt you'll find it anywhere.

 

One last option you could also try is contacting Gibson service. I did this once regarding a Newburgh GM, but even they didn't have a complete SN list, and were only able to date it by a range of numbers. As I already said, the original production logs haven't been complete.

 

Bernd

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  • 10 years later...
3 hours ago, Bobbit Nepo said:

Hello. I just brought in my Steinberger L2 black bass graphite SN-N1008. Hoping I could get it registered in existence. Its now here in Winnipeg, Canada. Thank you.

 

The list at SteinbergerWorld  is old, no longer updated. Its successor on the headless-europe.eu website is still continuously updated. The L2 bass with the serial number 1008 is already in the list. L-type instruments don't have a prefix (N or TN). Just the number. Is there anything you'd like to add to the existing entry?

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  • 9 months later...

I bought a GM7TA in 2005. It is printed "STEINBERGER USA N000941". The database does not appear to have anything beyond 1998 nr any number close to N000941. Is this a mistake or just no one bother to put up the serial numbers?

If anyone can share with me more of this piece's history will be very much grateful.

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ECC,

instruments in that numbering range can be found right at the beginning of the headless europe database. For example, there's a GM7TA with the prefix (MY)N and the serial 000961. That prefix (MY) stands for Music Yo, to distinguish between Newburgh and Music Yo instruments, both using "N" as a prefix. Your guitar is not yet there, but I will add it, if you give me more details. Please also read the description at the link above. This is not an official list published by Steinberger or Gibson, who both never published such a list and never will do. This is tedious manual work by fans, once started by Andy Yakubik (Steinberger World list, with about 1050 serials), and now continued by me (meanwhile 4050 serials). So it's neither a mistake nor "no one bothering" that your guitar isn't listed yet, it's just that nobody sent me the details yet to add it.

Besides the serial number list also check the "Steinberger Instruments Timeline", also at the link above. This will show you that your instrument was most likely built in 2004. An exact date is impossible to find out, because this info is not available from Gibson.

Bernd

Edited by Be.eM
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  • 1 year later...
1 hour ago, JosephMayhem said:

I inherited a Steinburger USA guitar and cannot find out anything about it. The serial number reads, N11904. 

Any information is greatly appreciated

Joseph,

if you'd show some pictures here we'd be able to tell you what you have. The serial number points to a manufacturing date in late 1990 or early 1991.

Bernd

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500kb is small lol so I had to chop the pic. Anyways, here is the body, front view, headstock and the serial. I tried to give a pic of the back but it was denied because it exceeded a 200kb file size lol 

Side note, this thing has Active EMG pickups. I hate 9volt batteries....

Front.jpg

Serial Number.jpg

Headstock.jpg

Edited by JosephMayhem
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This is a Steinberger GM-4T, made in Newburgh 1990/91. The "4" in the designation describes the H-S-S pickup configuration, the "T" stands for the TransTrem. Yes, this guitar has active EMGs (most likely 85-SA-SA) as a standard, and if the tone pot has a center notch it also has an active HazLabs EQ. In that case it would be a GM-4TA, with the "A" describing the additional active EQ.

Bernd

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Knobs lol I literally just call them the volume and tone knobs ha. Never heard them called pots before, but its useful to learn something new everyday. 

Upon further inspection, I do not see a center notch on the tone pot. So Im guessing its a GM-4T, which brings me to my next question. What is the value of this model? is it rare? Should I have it insured? Could Steinburger do any kind of modifications to it, if I wanted that?

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Yes, the magic happens below the surface and under the knob 😉

Regarding your further questions: you wouldn't see a center notch/detent, but feel it when turning the knob all the way up and down, in about the middle position. Does the tone knob lock in middle position?  If not, it's a passive tone and thus a GM-4T.

The value… a question I'm usually trying to avoid. But since you're completely new to the Steinberger brand, I'll try it. Yes, all Steinberger USA models are considered "rare", and yours (Newburgh production with bound body before 1992, with a TransTrem) even more. If it is in good and unmodified condition, the current sales value (actual sales prices, not fantasy driven asking prices) is between US$3,000-4,000. Modifications and any damage lower the value, of course.

Steinberger as a company doesn't exist any longer, so they cannot do any modifications for you. There are some luthiers working on Steinbergers and can do customizations, but they are expensive. HeadlessUSA comes to mind, with Jeff Babicz (a former Steinberger employee) doing the actual work, but there you'll pay about $1,000 just for a basic cleaning, setup and restoration job (including replacement of some standard TransTrem components like bearings etc.). Jeff does good work, but the pricing scheme is really, really high. Another really good luthier for Steinbergers is Peekamoose/Paul Schwartz. Great work, but also not cheap.

Question is: which kind of modification do you have in mind? And do you still want to do it, if this will lower the value (if an irreversible modification)?

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I checked the tone and volume pots and neither lock in the middle position, so I guess its settled, a GM-4T. After reading your response as to modifications and the fact it would lowerthe value, I've decided to keep this in it original state. 

I was thinking about those pickups, dont get me wrong, they sound awesome and so clean. I just hate dealing with the battery and thought about the possibility of an upgrade there. Or downgrade depending onhowyou look at it. But nonetheless, I will keep it as is. 

How did you determine the date of manufacturing? I'm asking because there is a guy on youtube withmy exact model and he is saying his is a 1980-88? 

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The GM was first introduced in late 1986/early 1987. Just check the information here, the serial number list is one source, and I've tried to display the timeline in a kind of "poster", showing which instruments where built when. 

If you think about replacing the pickups, just remove the complete original harness including pickups as they are, and keep them to be reinstalled when desired. The electronics wouldn't work with passive pickups anyway, so just keep things together and put them in a box for later. This will help to maintain the value, because you can simply restore it to original state.

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