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bigneil

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bigneil last won the day on February 17 2013

bigneil had the most liked content!

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About bigneil

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    British Watts are Louder !
  • Birthday 03/17/1976

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    Scotland
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    Guitars, movies, cars, guitars, banjos, guitars, computers, cycling, guitars, stringed instruments, guitars, loud amplifiers, music, guitars
  1. If I were you I would start by making sure all the wiring (knobs, switches, jack, etc) are properly connected and in good working order. If you don't know how I'm sure your local guitar store would check it over for you and probably repair it for a small affordable fee. However, if the wiring is fine you might have to invest in some new pickups, would be a good chance to upgrade on the stock ones.
  2. Cool story. $399 is a great price to pay for any nice guitar. Instruments are relatively more expensive in the UK. A crestwood delivered to my front door would cost almost £400. (about $600).
  3. When you were at the studio did you try a different guitar to see if the noise was still present?
  4. Now that really is a bonny collection. Unfortunately for you I have contacted the guitar police and told them that your collection is too large, they have stated that your collection has one guitar too many and will be issuing you with a court summons to face charges of 'hoarding stringed instruments' under the Musical Instruments Act 2013. I am willing to help you out of this dilemma by giving one of your guitars a new home - The Artcore or the Crestwood would be my preferred choices thanks. LOL
  5. Great idea Pat. It didn't occurr to me to switch the magnets. It makes perfect sense as they have just as much to do with the sound and output levels of the pickup as coil windings. Could get a bit fiddly though.
  6. Pickups choices tend to be very personal and is a ratherher subversive topic. If you are looking for a nice clear vintage sound you would do well to look for lower output PAF style humbuckers, if you ever need more grunt you can use a boost pedal or turn up the gain on your amp. I find a lot of higher output pickups sound great with hi gain but are difficult to play clean and many do not have the twang or top end jangle and can sound ...well muddy I suppose. The quality of the wires and the pots will make a difference too as will how they are wired (of which there are various methodologies all yielding slightly different characteristics). Many people find that new pots, wires, and switch will totally transform the sound without ever changing the pickups. Oh and looking just at the dc resistance measurements of pickups will only ever give you a rudimentary idea of how hot the pickups might be, but can't tell you much about how they sound. Personally I prefer low to medium output pickups even though I play dirty all the time.
  7. 339 Has a smaller body than the sheraton. I also believe that the Korean built thing is just smoke and mirrors...I bet when production is moved to a new location the Chinese built instruments will become revered and sought after.
  8. That's a bit like buying a second hand car then complaining that the front tyres are fitted to the back wheels and vice versa. You bought the guitar because you like the way it looks and handles. It's just a swich, rewire it or replace it.
  9. You've done your homework, the roller bridge will be a great addition.
  10. Cool! it looks great. I did a similar thing to a guitar once. I bought an epi lp for £10 (no electrics or hardware on and sanded down right through the veneer in places). I used cans of autobody spray paint and clear on top of the colour. It turned out pretty good in the end. I look forward to seing more pictures of your progress as you go along! P.S here's a before and after pic of how mine turned out.
  11. I forgot to say, I have noticed a significant improvement in a guitars playability, especially on fast runs or legato, whith a propperly cut nut.
  12. I usually run the slot straight (parallel to the neck), but sloped back to match the angle of the headstock. However, i'm not an expert and perhaps a slight angle would be beneficial, especially with trem equipped guitars ?
  13. I did a little research when I fitted a bigsby and some people postulated that bolting the bigsby straight on creates a very sharp break angle over the bridge which leads to higher probability of tuning issues, the standard fixes for this are usually to fit one of those metal adapters (like yours) or to move the bigsby further from the bridge. If I were you I would stick with the adapter plate.
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