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"Wrap around" stringing method


GibFen

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I've seen some guitars and read about the method of "wrapping" the strings around the tail piece instead of threading the standard way, through the back.

When wrapping you feed the string from the front of the tail piece and wrap it around and then on to the saddles.

Some say this can give more resonance and sustain as you can lower the tail piece down to the wood as there is plenty of additional angle for the string to sit on it's saddle without hitting the

back edge of the bridge, which you never want using either stringing method.

 

I've never tried this wrapping method.

Has anyone tried this on their ES guitars that have a tail piece?

And if so what are your impressions of any changes?

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I've seen some guitars and read about the method of "wrapping" the strings around the tail piece instead of threading the standard way, through the back.

When wrapping you feed the string from the front of the tail piece and wrap it around and then on to the saddles.

Some say this can give more resonance and sustain as you can lower the tail piece down to the wood as there is plenty of additional angle for the string to sit on it's saddle without hitting the

back edge of the bridge, which you never want using either stringing method.

 

I've never tried this wrapping method.

Has anyone tried this on their ES guitars that have a tail piece?

And if so what are your impressions of any changes?

Wouldn't try it

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I've gone back and forth with top wrapping on my CS-356. I used it for many years but can't convince myself there is an appreciable sound/tone difference on my particular guitar. I did experience what I thought was a "feel" difference, though. With the less steep angle between the bridge and the tailpiece the strings seemed to feel a half-size smaller in gauge due to what felt like less tension at standard pitch - sort of like having .0095 strings instead of my usual .010 gauge strings.

 

Every time I type that out it sounds illogical or impossible, but that's how it felt, I thought. Some folks get a similar effect by tuning down a half-step.

 

The geometry of each guitar can be a bit different due to neck angles. I'm not able to lower my tailpiece all the way without the strings hitting the back of the bridge as they travel from the saddles to the tailpiece, and some folks argue that a lower tailpiece leads to a stronger "sonic coupling" or vibration transference from the strings to the body. Top wrapping changes that angle, and makes it possible to go lower with the tailpiece.

 

On the other hand... a steeper angle from the saddles to the tailpiece may create more downward (towards the body) pressure at the saddles. And THAT may lead to stronger "sonic coupling". :unsure:

 

It only costs a set of strings to experiment.

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  • 1 month later...

I've never tried this on my 335 as I use 10's on this guitar but I do the top wrapping on my LP which I use 11's on and I do think that the top wrapping gives a bit less tension to the strings and makes them easier to bend but still gives the perceived tonal benefits of using bigger strings.

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