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colin 5150

Steinberger Tuners

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Hi to you all,

I've just signed up at the Gibson forum website, with recommendations from other users i know.

My question is, The R-Trem bridge tuners are incredibly hard to turn to tune the guitar in, the guitar is pretty new, is there a way to get the tuners to become smoother and easier to rotate? rather than turning them at the moment in a 'jerking' motion?

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The tuners are no high tech device. They are just threaded screws going through a threaded hole to lengthen or shorten the point the string is held changing the tension on the string. If they are hard to turn something is really wrong because there is no way to make them hard to turn other than stripping the threads or pulling the string too tight. Or they could rust i guess and mess them up.

Are they all hard to turn or just one or two?

Edited by r2bflash

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All are difficult, when tuning, you can turn them smoothly and the jerk making the note too sharp/flat. i was hunting for ideas and one person on another thread has said using very thin (0.5mm) PTFE nylon washers tend to allow the tuners to turn smoother against a smooth surface than when they're touching the steel face of the bridge.

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Good luck with it. Just so you will know from someone that has had R-Trems since the 80s, None of mine (have had about six and still have two) ever had a problem like that and never needed anything done to them to make them work very smooth. The only problems I have ever had with them were bent posts, never problems with them being hard to turn to tune.

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Now if your posts are bent and the trem is rubbing on the body or the guitar that may make it jerk sharp or flat but all the strings would go sharp or flat. Make sure you have the trem locked when you tune.

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Thanks for the help, I know the posts are fine, I use the trem very lightly, when the strings are loosened of the tuners turn no problem, it's under tension that the do, and the guitar is only 3 months old, it may be that they need a good 'work out' lol. I'll keep at it.

Thanks again.

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The washer suggestion is a good one.  Also, a very very wee bit of oil (not WD) on the screw threads can help as well.  Best...

 

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Hi Colin. I. Glad you posted this. My Steinberger is four months old, with very little use.

i have exactly the same problem. The tuners are very stiff. Perhaps it’s a new guitar thing. Although I found once they have started turning they are easier. I need to put more time into it really, but that, and with finding the neck seems “longer” because of the way the guitar sits and the thinner neck, I’ve spent more time with others.

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Hi Steve,

yes it's a little bugger to get used to playing, not having the place to rest the upper part of the lower arm near the elbow was a problem, is had two EVH wolgangs before i bought this one, but i've gave it a good set up, played on with the truss rod to find the 'sweet spot' and rigged the guitar with a full set of Seymour Duncans and it plays great. the advice about the PTFE washers was great, i paid about £6 for 10 on ebay, and the revolve great, the thinner strings a little better than the thicker ones, probably because there is more tension in those, but as you said in time constantly tuning it should ease the stiffness of the tuners.

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I very recently purchased a Spirit XT25 bass with the same problem. I picked up some of the nylon washers at the local hardware store, and that helped, but what I also did was remove the bridge, flipped it over and took it apart. I then unscrewed the string cups completely  and put a very small amount of white lithium grease on the threads. Then I re-assembled it. Between the lubrication and the washers, the tuning changed completely--much easier. I like a small amount of the white lithium grease on this for several reasons: (1) It does not thicken up. (2) It lasts a long time. (3) It's not runny, so it doesn't end up somewhere that you don't want it. (4) It's easy to find. Most any auto parts store will have it in a small tube. 

This lubrication is very important. I also own a 1988 XL2. I don't know what metal the threaded tuners on the Spirits are made of, but they're a cheap overseas instrument that Gibson cares little about, so I'd guess they aren't made of premium materials. The original tuners on my made-in-Newburgh XL2 are brass. This means they move smoothly, but brass being a soft metal, one of mine stripped out completely when I was changing strings. If this happens at the wrong time--say as you're tuning for a gig--you're screwed, and if there's is no lubrication on these tuners, they could easily strip out. I know this process is more difficult on a trans-trem instrument,  but I think you'll be happy you did it in the long run. When I opened mine up, I found that the factory didn't lubricate these threads at all, so what you put there is the only lubrication that will be there. Here is a video that was sent to me that should help you...Jim

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFhJv9lfYyQ&feature=youtu.be

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